Reversing Osteopenia: The Definitive Guide to Recognizing and Treating Early Bone Loss in Women of All Ages

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9780805076226: Reversing Osteopenia: The Definitive Guide to Recognizing and Treating Early Bone Loss in Women of All Ages

For the eighteen million American women afflicted with early bone-loss disease, here is the first comprehensive guide to identifying and controlling the condition before it progresses to osteoporosis

Osteoporosis, which afflicts more than half of all American women over the age of fifty, is a widespread and all-too-familiar problem. Osteopenia, a milder bone-loss disease that is the forerunner of osteoporosis, is less well known but affects an estimated eighteen million young and middle-aged women-including women in their late teens and early twenties. Since many doctors associate low bone density exclusively with postmenopausal women, millions of women in their childbearing years suffer from undetected bone loss, putting them at risk for debilitating fractures down the road.

In Reversing Osteopenia, Dr. Harris H. McIlwain and his two daughters, also rheumatologists, fill the knowledge gap about this easily diagnosable disease, help younger women recognize the risk factors for bone loss, and provide a five-step program for controlling and even preventing bone loss. Their age-specific recommendations for women in their twenties, thirties, forties, and fifties include
- exercises that strengthen rather than threaten your bones
- new information about foods that build bone density
- ways to avoid medicines that rob bones of their strength
- recommendations of natural dietary supplements

This groundbreaking book offers new hope for young women at risk for osteopenia.

"Sinopsis" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

About the Author:

Harris H. McIlwain, M.D., a board-certified rheumatologist, is the founder of the Tampa Medical Group. He has served as chairman of the Florida Osteoporosis Board since its inception five years ago. Town and Country has twice named him one of the best doctors in
America.

Laura McIlwain Cruse, M.D., and Kimberly Lynn McIlwain, M.D., are rheumatologists and board-certified internists in Florida.

Debra Fulghum Bruce, Ph.D., has written more than 2,500 articles and sixty-five books on various health topics.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

REVERSING OSTEOPENIA
CHAPTER 1 Step 1: Baby Your Bones Today more than ever, you must be the guardian of your own health. That means making informed decisions regarding early detection, prevention, and treatment of illness to keep yourself and your family healthy. While treating disease is critical, especially in the early stages when treatment works best, there is a compelling case supported by a host of scientific data that the prevention of any health problems should be your primary goal. Before we talk about specific ways you can baby your bones and prevent or reverse osteopenia or low bone mass, we need to explain the epidemic problem of bone loss and how the resulting painful and disfiguring fractures can rob you of your youthful appearance and an active, productive life. Diagnosis: Osteopenia Patient's Name: Christie Age: 41 Risk factors: History of low-calorie dieting, avoidance of dairy, thyroid disease Forty-one-year-old Christie had never heard of osteopenia until she had a bicycle accident and injured her wrist. This active mother of three was riding bikes with her family when her front tire hit a curb, and shewas thrown onto the hard pavement. She broke her fall with her hands but luckily did not receive a fracture. However, because she had a history of thyroid disease, dairy allergies, and years of low-calorie dieting--all key risk factors for osteopenia--we did a bone density test at our clinic. The results of her test revealed that she had early bone loss or osteopenia with the bone density of a woman ten years older. Patient's Name: Wendy Age: 30 Risk factors: Family history (grandmother), excessive exercise, amenorrhea, low body weight Wendy, age thirty, came to our clinic after her gynecologist raised concern about her low body weight and ordered a bone density test. As an avid marathon runner, Wendy was thin, muscular, and appeared to be the picture of health. But this young woman also dieted excessively and experienced amenorrhea (loss of menstrual periods)--key risk factors for osteopenia and fractures. Wendy told us that the first time she heard of bone loss was when the family discussed her grandmother's sudden death after complications from a hip fracture. "I thought thin bones were something older women got, not active people my age," she said after hearing the diagnosis of osteopenia. Patient's Name: Janie Age: 39 Risk factors: Early menopause (surgical), lack of estrogen replacement, sedentary lifestyle Janie had never been an exerciser and had an early menopause with hysterectomy in her early thirties because of fibroid tumors. She discovered her bone loss problem when she and some friends took advantage of a free screening--a heel bone density test--at a mall health fair. Three of the five women were found to have low bone mass. Because Janie did not supplement with estrogen hormone therapy after her surgery, she did not receive the protective effect on bones of estrogen hormone treatment. She later had a DEXA test which confirmed she had osteopenia. Understanding the Female Athlete Triad The female athlete triad is a constellation of medical conditions that are becoming increasingly common in women athletes. Specifically, these are eating disorders, amenorrhea (lack of menstrual periods), and osteopenia or low bone mass. Athletes who compete in gymnastics, dancing, swimming, skating, and running are at high risk for the female athlete triad, as they strive to appear lean and fit. We know that more female athletes have amenorrhea than women in the general population. Amenorrhea is associated with decreased estrogen levels, which may be the cause of osteopenia or low bone mass. Low-calorie diets are usually the first predictor of eating disorders. Excessive exercise or exercise obsession can be another sign of an eating disorder. Each of these three problems must be medically evaluated and treated to ensure a good outcome. Defining Bone Loss Are you surprised to hear that young women today are faced with bone thinning and fractures? Don't be! Osteopenia has been labeled the "young women's silent epidemic" by some experts because there are no warning signs. Such trendy behavior for young women as social drinking, smoking, drinking excessive amounts of coffee and diet colas, deprivation dieting, and lack of bone-strengthening exercise are all having a devastating effect on young bones. Even taking some forms of birth control may increase the risk of bone loss. For example, Depo-Provera (medroxyprogesterone acetate), an injectable contraceptive that prevents ovulation (the release of the egg by the ovary), causes the body to stop producing estrogen and progesterone. Both hormones are important for bone strength since estrogen slows down bone loss, and progesterone boosts bone growth. Osteopenia is every woman's concern--no matter what her age or health status--as this is the first stage preceding full-blown osteoporosis or severe bone loss. Moreover, fractures don't wait until you have osteoporosis. The risk of fractures increases with decreases in bone density. Once you have just one fracture, you are at a greater risk for more fractures. The good news is that osteopenia can be prevented or reversed before debilitating fractures occur. What Is Osteopenia? Osteopenia is thinning of bones that can be detected by a simple bone density test (see page 19) long before there is the severe bone loss and fracture risk of osteoporosis. In osteopenia, the bone density is lower than normal but not yet full osteoporosis. Many patients are confused when they hear that they have osteopenia. After all, the media has focused on full-blown osteoporosis for years with its resulting stooped posture and painful fractures. However, a diagnosis of osteopenia also means a greater risk of fractures. Studies indicate that patients with osteopenia sustain more fractures than patients with osteoporosis. It makes sense that the best time to take steps to reverse bone loss, strengthen bones, and prevent fractures is when osteopenia is found. A Major Risk for Fractures So, if osteopenia is a growing problem in the United States, why haven't you read much about it? Mainly, because doctors are just now beginning to learn how to deal with bone loss--just like they're learning to deal with heart disease in women. For instance, a decade ago, heart disease was not diagnosed in women until after a near fatal heart attack and loss of heart muscle. Doctors simply did not associate heart disease with women, even though it is now regarded as the single greatest health risk for women. Today, we know that keeping a regular check on body weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol can help prevent a woman's heart attack altogether, and both doctors and patients recognize the need to take preventive measures with lifestyle changes. Similarly, doctors are realizing that osteopenia is a major risk for the development of fractures. It is a warning sign that alerts you to take action before permanent damage is done from bone thinning. New estimates suggest that half of all women over the age of forty-five are now affected by low bone mass, including 90 percent of women over age seventy five. Moreover, those numbers continue to grow. That's why it's important to understand osteopenia and your personal risk factors in order to prevent or reverse bone loss before fractures occur. At menopause, there is a dramatic decline of estrogen, which causes rapid bone loss, leading to devastating hip fractures. Having the strongest bones possible before you enter menopause is the best weapon against debilitating fractures. While the emphasis in the medical community has been on postmenopausal women as prime targets of bone loss awarenesscampaigns, many--including the authors!--believe the target should include younger women, especially those who have time to reverse osteopenia before it results in debilitating fractures. Once bone has been lost in full-blown osteoporosis, treatment may not build bone that is as mechanically strong as the original bone. In other words, even if the bone density test results improve, the bone may never be as strong as it was before.. This makes the finding of osteopenia a lifesaving warning sign. While it is more common for women to suffer from fractures after menopause because of the dramatic drop in estrogen levels and the effect on bone, the process of bone loss begins much earlier. The stage is set for osteopenia early in life-- in your teens, 20s, 30s, and 40s. The problem is there are no noticeable symptoms of bone loss until you experience a sudden, painful fracture or substantial loss of height because of a vertebral fracture. By then, bones have become so weak that even mild stress like bending over, lifting a bag of groceries, or coughing can cause a fracture, horrific pain, and immobility. We believe that the fracture you want to prevent is the first one. By identifying women with risk factors for osteopenia early in life--while they can still make lifestyle changes to strengthen bones--we might prevent millions of fractures altogether. Imagine if all the women who suffer from painful hip fractures now could have had this lifesaving information twenty years ago! The key to living a strong life is simple: early detection and taking a few easy prevention steps to baby your bones years before bone loss and fractures occur. Understanding Fractures With osteopenia, bones become thin and weak, which makes them easier to break. Though painful, the break will usually heal. Yet, as long as the bones are thin and weak, they are increasingly susceptible to fractures and the subsequent immobility or even death. In fact, in adults, a grave predictor of bone problems is a previous fracture that occurred after a minor fall. If you had a fracture because of weak bones, your risk of another fracture is 2 to 20 times greater than someone who has never had a fracture. Half of all Americans will break a bone before age sixty-five. Now, if such fractures only affected fingers or toes, it would be inconvenient but not terribly limiting. However, bone loss commonly attacks with painful vengeance, severely limiting the activities of daily life. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), bone thinning is responsible for more than 1.5 million fractures each year. More than 300,000 hip fractures happen annually. While hip fracture is the most devastating fracture associated with bone loss, vertebral (spine) fracture is the most common, with over 750,000 each year. Fractures can be painful; they also cause deformities and are expensive. For example, fractures, especially when they affect the spine, can cause deformities such as the dowager's hump. The cost of hip fractures alone--both direct (hospitalization, surgery, and doctors' visits) and indirect (lost time from work)--exceeds $17 billion annually. This cost will only skyrocket ... unless we take action early on to prevent and reverse osteopenia. The number of fractures will also escalate over the next few years as the projected population over age sixty-five increases. One study recently predicted 4.5 million annual hip fractures worldwide in the year 2050. None of this has to happen to you. Doctors can treat and even reverse osteopenia and help you build stronger bones and end fractures forever. Hip Fractures "Aren't I a bit too young for a bone density test? Fractures only happen in the elderly," Suzi, a thirty-six-year-old woman with a history of eating disorders and exercise obsession, shared her concerns as we scheduled her for a bone density test. Untrue! While general bone loss among women commonly begins in the perimenopausal period (the years prior to menopause), bone loss from the hip can begin even earlier. Suzi's bone density score showed osteopenia and was lower than that of other women her age. Because of this, Suzi was at higher risk for future fractures. If you know someone who has had a hip fracture, then you have reason to be concerned about your own bone health. Hip fractures are very serious injuries, often a turning point, beyond which independent living is no longer possible. Perhaps you have a family member who was active and living alone--until she fell and broke her hip. For those who suffer hip fracture, recovery can be difficult as they face hospitalization, surgery, and months of painful, exhausting, and expensive therapy. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) estimates that a woman's risk of hip fracture is equal to her combined risk of breast, uterine, and ovarian cancers. Nearly one-fourth of hip fracture patients age fifty and older die in the year following their fracture, and one-fourth of those who were ambulatory before their hip fracture require long-term care afterward. Although there are several different areas in the hip that may break,most breaks are called hip fractures. These usually require surgery, since without surgery it takes six weeks or more of bed rest for fractures to heal. With surgery, the patient can usually be up and walking within a few days. The operation to correct these fractures is expensive, usually $35,000 to $40,000 or more. Along with this cost comes the higher risk of other serious medical problems such as blood clots, heart attack, pneumonia, and stroke. The worst cost is that many of these victims immediately lose their independence. Studies confirm that 95 percent of hip fractures result from falls. Weight-bearing and strengthening exercises (chapter 2) and the ancient art of tai chi (see page 38) are excellent ways to keep your body toned and flexible and your bones strong, so you can stay balanced and avoid falls and fractures no matter what your age. Spinal Fractures Spinal fractures affect more than 50 percent of all women. Significant changes in the spine from bone thinning are common. By age seventy-five, more than 50 percent of women have had a fracture in their spine with an estimated half-million vertebral fractures occurring annually. The most common deformity from bone loss, called the dowager's hump, happens in the upper part of the spine (see figure 1.1). Only about one-third of vertebral fractures produce symptoms. Generally, fractures in the lower spine are associated with more pain and loss of function than fractures in the upper spine, and multiple fractures are more problematic than a single fracture. Each fractured vertebra becomes shorter, usually by about one-quarter inch, and the spine bends forward. This gradually makes the person appear stooped over and results in decreased height. The loss of height may not even be noticed until you are measured in your doctor's office. In fact, the most common cause of loss of height as we age is bone loss. The stooped-over posture can make the abdomen more prominent. One of our patients said that she went from a height of 5'4" as a young woman to 4'11" at age seventy-five with full osteoporosis (see figure 1.2). As bones become thinner and weaker, the effort required to hold the body erect while standing or walking may be enough to cause a fracture. Bending can greatly stress the spine, often putting pressure equivalent to several times the weight of the body on the back. This pressure leads to fractures in weakened bones. After age forty-five, the most common cause of height loss is shortening of the bones of the spine by bone thinning. However, doctors should suspect bone loss in any person--no matter what her age--who loses height. When osteopenia affects the spine, fractures can happen in one of the vertebral bones. If each fracture in the spine causes about one-quarter-inch loss of height, after many fractures there may be a loss of several inches in to...

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Descripción Henry Holt Company Inc, United States, 2004. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. First.. Language: English . This book usually ship within 10-15 business days and we will endeavor to dispatch orders quicker than this where possible. Brand New Book. Osteoporosis, which afflicts more than half of all women over the age of fifty, is a widespread and all-too-familiar problem. Osteopenia, a milder bone-loss disease that is the forerunner of osteoporosis, is less well known but affects millions of young and middle-aged women including women in their late teens and early twenties. Since many doctors associate low bone density exclusively with postmenopausal women, millions of women in their childbearing years suffer from undetected bone loss, putting them at risk for debilitating fractures down the road. In Reversing Osteopenia, Dr. Harris H. Mcllwain and his two daughters, also rheumatologists, fill the knowledge gap about this easily diagnosable disease, help younger women recognize the risk factors for bone loss, and provide a five-step program for controlling and even preventing bone loss.Their age-specific recommendations for women in their twenties, thirities, forties, and fifties include: Exercises that strengthen rather than threaten your bones; New information about foods that build bone density; Ways to avoid medicines that rob bones of their strength; Recommendations of natural dietary supplements; This ground breaking book offers new hope for young women at risk for osteopenia. Nº de ref. de la librería BZE9780805076226

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