Papers of Sergeant J. L. R. Royall, Royal Artillery Search Light Training Instructor (Anti Aircraft), 1939-1942

[Sergeant J.L.R. Royall; Anti-Aircraft; Search Light]

Editorial: -1942, 1939
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These papers provide a unique insight into the top-secret workings of a vital branch of defensive warfare at its apogee - the Battle of Britain - during a period while it was integrating into its systems the new radar technology which would ultimately render it redundant, and at a time which saw it was at the forefront of the beginning of the integration of women into the armed services. The papers mainly consist of the operational papers (information, practice and lecture notes), used by Royall as an instructor, with the large number of drafts indicating the quickly-changing nature of the technology. Also present are a number of Royall's own manuscript essays, and a number of documents relating specifically to him and his units.Comprising 245 items (228 mimeographed and 17 manuscript), totalling 438pp., 8vo; and 60pp., 12mo. The earliest dated 1 May 1939 and the latest 8 December 1942. In good condition, on aged paper. Printed documents with reference to: the Searchlight Wing School of A. A. Defence, Shrivenham, Swindon; Grove Park, Lewisham; Wingate Barracks, Oswestry; Bristol; Norton Manor Barracks, Taunton; and Copythorne, Romsey and Nursling, Hampshire. Two Royal Artillery Searchlight Training Regiments are mentioned: 222 (Taunton, Somerset) and 236 (Shrewsbury, Shropshire). For background information in the hitherto-neglected field of Anti-Aircraft Searchlights, see Keith Brigstock's excellent paper 'Royal Artillery Searchlights', read before the Royal Artillery Historical Society on 17 January 2007. The following two paragraphs attempt to precis the relevant material from Brigstock's paper. The first Gunner Searchlight regiments, formed in 1938, were equipped with new 90cm Projector Anti Aircraft, as searchlights were officially called. These were supported by lorry-mounted generators: the Tilling Stevens and the Thornycroft, supplemented by two-wheeled Lister trailers. At the time searchlights relied heavily on acoustic technology: sound locators fitted with large parabolic receivers and sensitive microphone detectors which, due to their size, were mounted on large four wheel trailers. A new development was cathode-ray tube enabling: a green screen from which the operators could see sound converted to a visual display. Another new piece of equipment was the 150cm searchlight, which, mounted on its own four-wheeled trailer, had a powerful, narrow beam capable of penetrating mist and low cloud to illuminate targets at 20,000 feet. During the Battle of Britain these 150cm Searchlights were issued in quantity but did not have the effect hoped for. In November 1940 the searchlights in the 11 Group area were reorganised and ordered to form clusters in sites with one 150cm and two 90cm searchlights. Towards the end of 1941 the Air Defence Research and Development Establishment in Christchurch produced a new radar-controlled searchlight, SLC or 'Elsie', making the sound locator redundant. At the end of 1941 there were 71 Royal Artillery Searchlight Regiments. A regiment had a strength of 52 Officers and 1622 ORs. It was commanded by a lieutenant-colonel, and consisted of four batteries, each commanded by a major, with a strength of 11 officers and 365 ORs. A battery consisted of four troops each with six searchlights and was usually commanded by a captain. Both the 90 and 150 cm searchlights had ten-man detachments on static sites. This gave a regiment a total equipment strength of 96 searchlights. Following a secret trial called the Newark Experiment carried out in April 1941, women were sent for training at Rhyl. In July 1942 the first seven searchlight troops were formed with ATS members. The top secret nature of Royall's work makes the survival of these papers all the more fortuitous. An undated set of 'Notes for G. L. Operators' emphasizes the point: 'SECRECY: The following notes on G. L. are SECRET. | It is known that the enemy has been experimenting on the development of equipment similar to G. L. but has failed to prod. N° de ref. de la librería

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Título: Papers of Sergeant J. L. R. Royall, Royal ...
Editorial: -1942
Año de publicación: 1939

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Sergeant J.L.R. Royall; Anti-Aircraft; Search Light]
Editorial: -1942 (1939)
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Descripción -1942, 1939. These papers provide a unique insight into the top-secret workings of a vital branch of defensive warfare at its apogee - the Battle of Britain - during a period while it was integrating into its systems the new radar technology which would ultimately render it redundant, and at a time which saw it was at the forefront of the beginning of the integration of women into the armed services. The papers mainly consist of the operational papers (information, practice and lecture notes), used by Royall as an instructor, with the large number of drafts indicating the quickly-changing nature of the technology. Also present are a number of Royall's own manuscript essays, and a number of documents relating specifically to him and his units.Comprising 245 items (228 mimeographed and 17 manuscript), totalling 438pp., 8vo; and 60pp., 12mo. The earliest dated 1 May 1939 and the latest 8 December 1942. In good condition, on aged paper. Printed documents with reference to: the Searchlight Wing School of A. A. Defence, Shrivenham, Swindon; Grove Park, Lewisham; Wingate Barracks, Oswestry; Bristol; Norton Manor Barracks, Taunton; and Copythorne, Romsey and Nursling, Hampshire. Two Royal Artillery Searchlight Training Regiments are mentioned: 222 (Taunton, Somerset) and 236 (Shrewsbury, Shropshire). For background information in the hitherto-neglected field of Anti-Aircraft Searchlights, see Keith Brigstock's excellent paper 'Royal Artillery Searchlights', read before the Royal Artillery Historical Society on 17 January 2007. The following two paragraphs attempt to precis the relevant material from Brigstock's paper. The first Gunner Searchlight regiments, formed in 1938, were equipped with new 90cm Projector Anti Aircraft, as searchlights were officially called. These were supported by lorry-mounted generators: the Tilling Stevens and the Thornycroft, supplemented by two-wheeled Lister trailers. At the time searchlights relied heavily on acoustic technology: sound locators fitted with large parabolic receivers and sensitive microphone detectors which, due to their size, were mounted on large four wheel trailers. A new development was cathode-ray tube enabling: a green screen from which the operators could see sound converted to a visual display. Another new piece of equipment was the 150cm searchlight, which, mounted on its own four-wheeled trailer, had a powerful, narrow beam capable of penetrating mist and low cloud to illuminate targets at 20,000 feet. During the Battle of Britain these 150cm Searchlights were issued in quantity but did not have the effect hoped for. In November 1940 the searchlights in the 11 Group area were reorganised and ordered to form clusters in sites with one 150cm and two 90cm searchlights. Towards the end of 1941 the Air Defence Research and Development Establishment in Christchurch produced a new radar-controlled searchlight, SLC or 'Elsie', making the sound locator redundant. At the end of 1941 there were 71 Royal Artillery Searchlight Regiments. A regiment had a strength of 52 Officers and 1622 ORs. It was commanded by a lieutenant-colonel, and consisted of four batteries, each commanded by a major, with a strength of 11 officers and 365 ORs. A battery consisted of four troops each with six searchlights and was usually commanded by a captain. Both the 90 and 150 cm searchlights had ten-man detachments on static sites. This gave a regiment a total equipment strength of 96 searchlights. Following a secret trial called the Newark Experiment carried out in April 1941, women were sent for training at Rhyl. In July 1942 the first seven searchlight troops were formed with ATS members. The top secret nature of Royall's work makes the survival of these papers all the more fortuitous. An undated set of 'Notes for G. L. Operators' emphasizes the point: 'SECRECY: The following notes on G. L. are SECRET. | It is known that the enemy has been experimenting on the development of equipment similar to G. L. but has failed to prod. Nº de ref. de la librería 18958

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