Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City (Inside Technology)

4,1 valoración promedio
( 72 valoraciones por GoodReads )
 
9780262516129: Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City (Inside Technology)
Críticas:

"In this exquisitely researched book, Norton guides us through the complex and passionate debates that cleared the street to make way for the car. These decisions made decades ago still shape our cities, so they are vital to understanding the future of the automobile, as well as its past."--Zachary M. Schrag, author of The Great Society Subway: A History of the Washington Metro -- Zachary M. Schrag "In this exquisitely researched book, Norton guides us through the complex and passionate debates that cleared the street to make way for the car. These decisions made decades ago still shape our cities, so they are vital to understanding the future of the automobile, as well as its past." Zachary M. Schrag , author of The Great Society Subway: A History of the Washington Metro "This is rigorous scholarship the history of technology, and the history of the automobile in particular, will truly benefit from. Norton's fascinating, in-depth history shows the automotive revolution was fought in the streets, reshaping the use of public space and impacting perceptions for generations thereafter." Gijs Mom , author of The Electric Vehicle: Technology and Expectations in the Automobile Age "We forget that the search for mobility in urban areas has also led to a massive increase in mortality. Fighting Traffic makes the linkage between mobility and mortality explicit. This is a cutting edge work in mobility history and a major contribution to urban history." Clay McShane , author of Down the Asphalt Path

Reseña del editor:

Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily a motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrians were condemned as "jaywalkers." In Fighting Traffic, Peter Norton argues that to accommodate automobiles, the American city required not only a physical change but also a social one: before the city could be reconstructed for the sake of motorists, its streets had to be socially reconstructed as places where motorists belonged. It was not an evolution, he writes, but a bloody and sometimes violent revolution. Norton describes how street users struggled to define and redefine what streets were for. He examines developments in the crucial transitional years from the 1910s to the 1930s, uncovering a broad anti-automobile campaign that reviled motorists as "road hogs" or "speed demons" and cars as "juggernauts" or "death cars." He considers the perspectives of all users--pedestrians, police (who had to become "traffic cops"), street railways, downtown businesses, traffic engineers (who often saw cars as the problem, not the solution), and automobile promoters. He finds that pedestrians and parents campaigned in moral terms, fighting for "justice." Cities and downtown businesses tried to regulate traffic in the name of "efficiency." Automotive interest groups, meanwhile, legitimized their claim to the streets by invoking "freedom"--a rhetorical stance of particular power in the United States. Fighting Traffic offers a new look at both the origins of the automotive city in America and how social groups shape technological change.Peter D. Norton is Assistant Professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at the University of Virginia.

"Sobre este título" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

Los mejores resultados en AbeBooks

1.

Peter D Norton,
Editorial: MIT Press (MA) January 2011 (2011)
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Trade Paperback Cantidad: 2
Librería
Hennessey + Ingalls
(Los Angeles, CA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción MIT Press (MA) January 2011, 2011. Trade Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverseand included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets wereprimarily a motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrianswere condemned as 'jaywalkers.' In Fighting Traffic, Peter Norton arguesthat to accommodate automobiles, the American city required not only a physicalchange but also a social one: before the city could be reconstructed for the sake ofmotorists, its streets had to be socially reconstructed as places where motoristsbelonged. It was not an evolution, he writes, but a bloody and sometimes violentrevolution. Norton describes how street users struggled to define and redefine whatstreets were for. He examines developments in the crucial transitional years fromthe 1910s to the 1930s, uncovering a broad anti-automobile campaign that reviledmotorists as 'road hogs' or 'speed demons' and cars as'juggernauts' or 'death cars.' He considers the perspectives ofall users--pedestrians, police (who had to become 'traffic cops'), streetrailways, downtown businesses, traffic engineers (who often saw cars as the problem, not the solution), and automobile promoters. He finds that pedestrians and parentscampaigned in moral terms, fighting for 'justice.' Cities and downtownbusinesses tried to regulate traffic in the name of 'efficiency.'Automotive interest groups, meanwhile, legitimized their claim to the streets byinvoking 'freedom'--a rhetorical stance of particular power in the UnitedStates. Fighting Traffic offers a new look at both the origins of the automotivecity in America and how social groups shape technological change.Peter D. Norton isAssistant Professor in the Department of Science, Technology, and Society at theUniversity of Virginia. The fight for the future of the city street between pedestrians, street railways, and promoters of the automobile between 1915 and 1930. Nº de ref. de la librería 20110128126140

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 20,06
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 4,63
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

2.

Peter D. Norton
Editorial: MIT Press Ltd, United States (2011)
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 10
Librería
The Book Depository US
(London, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción MIT Press Ltd, United States, 2011. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. 218 x 145 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily a motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrians were condemned as jaywalkers. In Fighting Traffic, Peter Norton argues that to accommodate automobiles, the American city required not only a physical change but also a social one: before the city could be reconstructed for the sake of motorists, its streets had to be socially reconstructed as places where motorists belonged. It was not an evolution, he writes, but a bloody and sometimes violent revolution. Norton describes how street users struggled to define and redefine what streets were for. He examines developments in the crucial transitional years from the 1910s to the 1930s, uncovering a broad anti-automobile campaign that reviled motorists as road hogs or speed demons and cars as juggernauts or death cars. He considers the perspectives of all users--pedestrians, police (who had to become traffic cops ), street railways, downtown businesses, traffic engineers (who often saw cars as the problem, not the solution), and automobile promoters. He finds that pedestrians and parents campaigned in moral terms, fighting for justice. Cities and downtown businesses tried to regulate traffic in the name of efficiency. Automotive interest groups, meanwhile, legitimized their claim to the streets by invoking freedom -- a rhetorical stance of particular power in the United States. Fighting Traffic offers a new look at both the origins of the automotive city in America and how social groups shape technological change. Nº de ref. de la librería AAH9780262516129

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 26,98
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

3.

Peter D. Norton
Editorial: MIT Press Ltd, United States (2011)
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 10
Librería
The Book Depository
(London, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción MIT Press Ltd, United States, 2011. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. 218 x 145 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily a motor thoroughfares where children did not belong and where pedestrians were condemned as jaywalkers. In Fighting Traffic, Peter Norton argues that to accommodate automobiles, the American city required not only a physical change but also a social one: before the city could be reconstructed for the sake of motorists, its streets had to be socially reconstructed as places where motorists belonged. It was not an evolution, he writes, but a bloody and sometimes violent revolution. Norton describes how street users struggled to define and redefine what streets were for. He examines developments in the crucial transitional years from the 1910s to the 1930s, uncovering a broad anti-automobile campaign that reviled motorists as road hogs or speed demons and cars as juggernauts or death cars. He considers the perspectives of all users--pedestrians, police (who had to become traffic cops ), street railways, downtown businesses, traffic engineers (who often saw cars as the problem, not the solution), and automobile promoters. He finds that pedestrians and parents campaigned in moral terms, fighting for justice. Cities and downtown businesses tried to regulate traffic in the name of efficiency. Automotive interest groups, meanwhile, legitimized their claim to the streets by invoking freedom -- a rhetorical stance of particular power in the United States. Fighting Traffic offers a new look at both the origins of the automotive city in America and how social groups shape technological change. Nº de ref. de la librería AAH9780262516129

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 27,00
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

4.

Peter D. Norton
Editorial: MIT Press (2011)
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Cantidad: 14
Librería
Books2Anywhere
(Fairford, GLOS, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción MIT Press, 2011. PAP. Estado de conservación: New. New Book. Shipped from UK in 4 to 14 days. Established seller since 2000. Nº de ref. de la librería WM-9780262516129

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 18,46
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 10,45
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

5.

Peter D. Norton
Editorial: MIT Press
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Cantidad: > 20
Librería
INDOO
(Avenel, NJ, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción MIT Press. Estado de conservación: New. Brand New. Nº de ref. de la librería 0262516128

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 28,20
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,25
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

6.

Norton, Peter D.
Editorial: The MIT Press (2011)
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción The MIT Press, 2011. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. book. Nº de ref. de la librería 0262516128

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 31,48
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

7.

Peter D. Norton
Editorial: The MIT Press (2011)
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
Ergodebooks
(RICHMOND, TX, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción The MIT Press, 2011. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. Nº de ref. de la librería DADAX0262516128

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 33,54
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,70
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

8.

NORTON
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
Herb Tandree Philosophy Books
(Stroud, GLOS, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción 2011. Paperback. Estado de conservación: NEW. 9780262516129 This listing is a new book, a title currently in-print which we order directly and immediately from the publisher. Nº de ref. de la librería HTANDREE01142700

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 29,83
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 9,29
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

9.

Peter D. Norton
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
Grand Eagle Retail
(Wilmington, DE, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción 2011. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. 149mm x 20mm x 221mm. Paperback. Before the advent of the automobile, users of city streets were diverse and included children at play and pedestrians at large. By 1930, most streets were primarily a motor thoroughfares w.Shipping may be from multiple locations in the US or from the UK, depending on stock availability. 396 pages. 0.517. Nº de ref. de la librería 9780262516129

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 41,00
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

10.

Norton, Peter D.
Editorial: The MIT Press (2011)
ISBN 10: 0262516128 ISBN 13: 9780262516129
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 3
Librería
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción The MIT Press, 2011. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. Nº de ref. de la librería P110262516128

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 48,29
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 2,77
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

Existen otras copia(s) de este libro

Ver todos los resultados de su búsqueda