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  • Böll, Heinrich ( Übersetzung) ; Salinger, J. D.

    Publicado por Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 1963

    Librería: Antiquariat Luna, Lüneburg, Alemania

    Valoración del vendedor: Valoración 5 estrellas

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    Ejemplar firmado

    EUR 15,00 Gastos de envío

    De Alemania a España

    Cantidad disponible: 1

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    Original-Leinen. Condición: Gut. Estado de la sobrecubierta: Gut. deutschsprachige Erstausgabe. auf Vorsatz signiert von dem deutschen Schriftsteller und Nobelpreisträger Heinrich Böll ( 1917-85) leichte Gebrauchsspuren. signed by author . Size: 8°. Vom Autor signiert. Buch.

  • Imagen del vendedor de Franny and Zooey (Signed by Larry McMurtry!) a la venta por Grayshelf Books, ABAA, IOBA

    Salinger, J. D.

    Publicado por Little, Brown, 1961

    ISBN 10: 0316769541ISBN 13: 9780316769549

    Librería: Grayshelf Books, ABAA, IOBA, Tomball, TX, Estados Unidos de America

    Miembro de asociación: ABAA IOBA

    Valoración del vendedor: Valoración 5 estrellas

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    Libro Original o primera edición Ejemplar firmado

    EUR 36,95 Gastos de envío

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    Hardcover. Condición: Very Good. Estado de la sobrecubierta: Near Fine. 1st Edition. Stated First Edition with no mention of subsequent printings (First Printing); A Very Good or better book in a Near Fine dust jacket. SIGNED by Larry McMurtry to the front free paper, with an early legible signature and dated 1969; McMurtry's personal bookplate is affixed to the front pastedown. A unique copy of this novel by the author of "The Catcher in the Rye"; uncommon to find McMurtry's bookplate, rare indeed to find his early signature from his personal library. This copy is in very good or better condition showing only some mild sunning to the spine and light rubbing to the board edges; housed in a crisp and bright near fine jacket that shows light rubbing to the edges, faint soiling to the spine and back panel, and a general hint of age-toning. Overall, a highly collectible and unique item; a welcome addition to any 20th Century Lit or Modern First Edition collection. Not remaindered, not price clipped, not ex-library; in a protective Mylar sleeve and will ship carefully wrapped in a sturdy box. Signed by Author(s).

  • Imagen del vendedor de J.D. Salinger Typed Letter Signed to Publishers about "Franny and Zooey," May 27, 1961 a la venta por Max Rambod Inc

    Salinger, J.D.

    Librería: Max Rambod Inc, Woodland Hills, CA, Estados Unidos de America

    Miembro de asociación: ABAA ILAB

    Valoración del vendedor: Valoración 2 estrellas

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    EUR 7.136,01

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    A revealing letter signed by J.D. Salinger, all relating to the impending publication of Franny and Zooey. Salinger wrote this letter just over a month before Franny and Zooey was published, as he received the corrected proofs. 1 page, typed and signed in his hand in full, "J.D. Salinger" to his publisher. In it, he attempts to convince Little, Brown that the most authentic running heads for "Franny" and "Zooey," would be with the individual titles, rather than the full Franny and Zooey. He argues in true Salinger fashion, "I really can't see, at all, why an appropriate running head for a short story need appear to be anything except what it is." In 1955 and 1957, "Franny" and then "Zooey," two stories about the youngest members of the Glass family, were released separately in the New Yorker. In July of 1961 they became the two-part book, Franny and Zooey. Through the publication process, Salinger fought to keep creative control. Since Little, Brown first championed Salinger's artistic vision ten years earlier by publishing The Catcher in the Rye, the author placed his faith in them. However, as he writes here, Little-Brown's general approach in this affair of the Running Heads "doesn't exactly inspire confidence." Their competing visions did not always mesh. He writes, "I find all the suggested aesthetic reasons" for running Franny and Zooey as a head over the story FRANNY "very hard to take." Salinger relentlessly pursued authenticity. As he explains to Miss Rackliffe, the stories must have their appropriate title, rather than bowing to an incorrect one for aesthetic reasons: "Your department now agrees that Franny is the appropriate running head for the story FRANNY, and that Zooey is the appropriate one for the story ZOOEY, but I gather you all feel that those single short titles drags the page badly or unnicely." However, he discourages the "drastic remedy" of "[e]ntirely deleting the running heads." He goes on to reference Nine Stories, which Little-Brown published. "Surely the word Teddy looks perfectly reasonable carried as a running head. It just is what it is: the title of the story." Comes with envelope. An important Salinger letter that shows how he tried to protect his literary integrity throughout the publication process.

  • Imagen del vendedor de J. D. Salinger Signed Contract for "Franny and Zooey" a la venta por Max Rambod Inc

    Salinger, J.D.

    Librería: Max Rambod Inc, Woodland Hills, CA, Estados Unidos de America

    Miembro de asociación: ABAA ILAB

    Valoración del vendedor: Valoración 2 estrellas

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    Manuscrito Original o primera edición Ejemplar firmado

    EUR 8.563,22

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    DS, signed "J. D. Salinger," one page both sides, 8.5 x 14, February 25, 1964. Agreement between Salinger and the publisher Ediciones AT of Barcelona regarding "the work by J. D. Salinger entitled: Franny and Zooey," in which the author grants the "sole and exclusive license to translate, print, publish and sell the said work in volume form only in a regular trade edition in the Catalan language." Especially interesting are the additional terms added at the end of the standard form which reflect Salinger's demands for privacy: "It is understood by the Publisher that no photographs may be used on the cover or jacket or in any connection with the book. No photographs should be used in promotional copy or advertising. No biographical material may be used for promotion or advertising." Expected document wear, small edge separations at folds, and paper loss to upper corners (not affecting any text), otherwise fine condition. Salinger's intense demand for privacy-no photographs, no biography-is certainly the most striking element of this publishing contract. He had famously withdrawn to Cornish, New Hampshire, nearly a decade earlier and by this time was essentially absent from any public life. His two short stories, 'Franny' and 'Zooey,' first appeared separately in the New Yorker in 1955 and 1957. They were published together in book form in 1961, and Salinger's private nature is inherent even to the first English edition of Franny and Zooey. On the dust jacket flap of the first edition, Salinger wrote: 'It is my rather subversive opinion that a writer's feelings of anonymity-obscurity are the second most valuable property on loan to him during his working years.' Salinger's autograph is rare in any format and this is an ideal example in all respects-a rare publishing document for a well-known work enhanced by its explicit connection to the author's legendary reclusiveness.

  • Imagen del vendedor de J.D. Salinger Letter Signed, On Several Works Including Franny and Zooey and Catcher, and also Comes with Annotated and Unpublished Draft for the Dust Jacket of Raise High the Roofbeams a la venta por Max Rambod Inc

    Salinger, J.D.

    Librería: Max Rambod Inc, Woodland Hills, CA, Estados Unidos de America

    Miembro de asociación: ABAA ILAB

    Valoración del vendedor: Valoración 2 estrellas

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    Manuscrito Original o primera edición Ejemplar firmado

    EUR 14.272,03

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    Salinger, J.D. [Jerome David]. Typed letter signed by J.D. Salinger as "Jerry" with an accompanying, unpublished Hand Annotated typed draft for the dust jacket for Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenter and Seymour: An Introduction. Dated Sept. 10, 1962. This letter is part a correspondence between Salinger and his publisher at Little, Brown regarding the dust jacket copy for his last published anthology Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction. Salinger's fame exploded after publication, and he soon found he had become too recognizable a figure to continue living in New York City and maintain any semblance of privacy. He moved to rural Cornish, New Hampshire, but he was still pursued by media and fans alike. In a letter sent just one day earlier, Salinger asked for "somebody at your office to write [Lotte Jacobi] a letter of protest" and ask her to stop circulating a photo that she had taken of him for the first edition cover of Catcher in the Rye. (copy included). The famous author's requests to stop the circulation of his photo was a high priority to Little, Brown, as by the time of this second letter, just one day later, his literary agent had informed Salinger that the publisher is taking care of the matter: "Dorothy [Olding, Salinger's agent] told me on the phone that you are going to get in touch with Lotte Jacobi. Thanks very much." Salinger also includes a new draft for the dust jacket for Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenter and Seymour: An Introduction. The draft was typed by Salinger and also includes a correction in his hand. In this new draft of the jacket copy, he writes: "I think that the joys and satisfactions of writing seem to be increasing for me with the years." yet goes on to list some of the pitfalls of literary success-and complains again about the violations to his privacy by the "snoots, the exploiters, the privacy strippers.and free-lance maggots who get right on the job whether or no the victims' pulses are still going." He clearly understood the extremity of his words, for the purpose of a dust jacket, yet explains to Kelly in these letters that (since he avoids media) it is his only channel for expressing his true feelings: "It's a bit torrid, in spots, and I hope it won't be a worry for Little, Brown. It's my only way of speaking up, though." Salinger's publisher always stood by their star author; however, a highly sanitized version of these drafts, containing none of his sentiments on publication or privacy, was printed on the final jacket. In our letter Salinger also writes about his upcoming publication, although he prefers to call it by a different name, "I strongly prefer to speak of the two stories in this book as just being slipped into hard covers together for the first time." "Both Stories," as Salinger explains in the draft dust jackets, "are concerned with Seymour Glass, the chief character in my still-uncompleted series about a rather average American family of Sappho buffs, vaudevillians, poets, actors, writers, avaivartakas, and somewhat widely-alleged retreaters from "reality" -- the Glasses. Both stories originally appeared in The New Yorker - RAISE HIGH THE ROOF BEAM, CARPENTERES in 1957, SEYMOUR - An Introduction in 1959." In the draft jacket he also differentiates these stories from his previous publication as well, he writes "Certainly not paired off, as FRANNY and ZOOEY no doubt were." He mentions the impending publication of further work as well. "It seems to me that I'd better hurry up and do it [publish] if I intend to avoid undue and undesirable collision with new material." Salinger ultimately found the process of publication too painful and never released any new material, and the final dust jacket version is brief, including only Salinger's synopsis of the book and his hint at future publications to come. Therefore, the majority, and unquestionably the most interesting part of these drafts remain unpublished, and unknown except through these original pages from his own typewriter, to which he has made changes with his own pen.

  • Imagen del vendedor de J.D. Salinger Typed Letter Signed Mentions Catcher, Franny and Zooey, and Comes with Annotated Unpublished Draft of the Raise High. Dust Jacket a la venta por Max Rambod Inc

    Salinger, J.D.

    Librería: Max Rambod Inc, Woodland Hills, CA, Estados Unidos de America

    Miembro de asociación: ABAA ILAB

    Valoración del vendedor: Valoración 2 estrellas

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    Manuscrito Ejemplar firmado

    EUR 20.932,31

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    SALINGER, J.D. Typed Letter Signed "Jerry" with accompanying, unpublished draft for the dust jacket for Raise High the Roofbeams, Carpenter and Seymour: An Introduction. The draft was typed by Salinger and also includes a correction in his hand. Dated Sept. 9, 1962. Although Salinger was preparing for the publication of his final anthology about the Glass Family, he writes a letter to his agent mentioning The Catcher in the Rye: "When The Catcher in the Rye was on the fire, Little-Brown paid for some pictures of me taken by a woman named Lotte Jacobi." The Lotte Jacobi photo was printed large across the back cover of the first two printings of The Catcher in the Rye. Salinger's fame exploded after publication, and he soon found he had become too recognizable to continue living in New York City with any semblance of privacy. By the third printing of Catcher, he had his image removed from the book jacket, yet he was pained by it his whole life, even going so far as asking his publishing house to writer her a letter of protest. Even today it remains the most well-known and commonly published image of Salinger, who eventually moved to rural Cornish, New Hampshire, to escape his own celebrity. Salinger attached a draft he had typed of the dust jacket, In this draft Salinger writes about his upcoming publication that both stories are concerned with Seymour Glass, the chief character of his still-uncompleted series about a "rather average American family of Vedic Sanskrit students, vaudevillians, poets, actors, writers, avaivartakas, Sappho buffs, and widely-alleged retreaters from "reality": the Glasses. Salinger goes on to contrast them with Frany and Zooey. He mentions the impending publication of further work as well. "It seems to me that I'd better hurry up and do it [publish] if I intend to avoid undue and undesirable collision with new material." Salinger ultimately found the process of publication too painful and never released any new material during his lifetime, and the final dust jacket version is brief, including only Salinger's synopsis of the book and his hint at future publications to come. Therefore, the majority, and unquestionably the most interesting part of these drafts remain unpublished, and unknown except through these originals from his own typewriter. Taken together with his uncommon discussion of The Catcher in the Rye, this set of documents covers nearly all of Salinger's published books.