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Poor Man's Feast: A Love Story of Comfort, Desire, and the Art of Simple Cooking "Signed&... Poor Man's Feast: A Love Story of Comfort, Desire, and the Art of Simple Cooking "Signed&...

Poor Man's Feast: A Love Story of Comfort, Desire, and the Art of Simple Cooking "Signed"

Elissa Altman

539 valoraciones por Goodreads
ISBN 10: 1452107599 / ISBN 13: 9781452107592
Editorial: U.S.A.: Chronicle Books, 2013
Nuevos Condición: New Encuadernación de tapa dura
Librería: Gambits Collectibles (Colorado Springs, CO, Estados Unidos de America)

Librería en AbeBooks desde: 7 de mayo de 2014

Cantidad: 1

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Descripción

Synopsis: From James Beard Award-winning writer Elissa Altman comes a story that marries wit to warmth, and flavor to passion. Born and raised in New York to a food-phobic mother and food-fanatical father, Elissa was trained early on that fancy is always best. After a childhood spent dining everywhere from Le Pavillion to La Grenouille, she devoted her life to all things gastronomical, from the rare game birds she served at elaborate dinner parties in an apartment so tiny that guests couldn't turn around to the eight timbale molds she bought while working at Dean & DeLuca, just so she could make tall food. But love does strange things to people, and when Elissa met Susan ? a small-town Connecticut Yankee with parsimonious tendencies and a devotion to simple living ? it would change Elissa's relationship with food, and the people who taught her about it, forever. With tender and often hilarious honesty (and 27 delicious recipes), Poor Man's Feast is a universal tale of finding sustenance and peace in a world of excess and inauthenticity, and shows us how all our stories are inextricably bound up with what, and how, we feed ourselves and those we love. Review: Q&A with Elissa Altman Q. How did you decide to start your blog, Poor Man's Feast, back in 2008? A. I had just come off many years as a food writer for magazines, a stint as a restaurant critic, and a frequent food radio guest host, and I realized that there was very little public discourse about food as sustenance; instead, our public discussion about food was tied to food as fuel, food as health, food as entertainment. So when I started Poor Man's Feast in 2008, it was my goal to create a narrative about the way we feed ourselves and others in our homes, in our lives, in our collective past. I wanted to talk about simple food as the thing that brings us together as people, rather than divides us. Q. You've been a cookbook editor, a columnist, a personal chef, and a caterer. How does blogging compare to your previous food careers? A. It's very gratifying; for one thing, it provides an almost instantaneous connection to the public. For another, my readers can tell me what they like, what they expect, what they want with great immediacy. They keep me engaged and connected, and I've learned more about food and the way we eat in this country than I did when I was doing any of those other jobs. I'm still a cookbook editor, though, and I love that job because, quite simply, I adore the art and practice of making books. I'm a total bibliophile; it's an embarrassing addiction. Q. Do you think your writing or the blog has evolved over the past five years? How so? A. Gosh, I certainly hope so. When I started writing the blog, it tended to be very sly and sometimes even a bit attitudinal, and back then, that was okay. But what I think has happened --- at least what my readers have told me has happened --- is that it's become far more narratively driven instead of recipe driven; I'm telling more stories that revolve explicitly around food and family and life. Today I seem to be writing a lot more about what it means to be living and cooking in 2013 America while holding down a job (or three), commuting, finding a few more gray hairs in the morning, but always thinking about what's cooking at the end of the day. Q. How was working on the book different than working on the blog? Were there any specific challenges to writing a book that you don't encounter on the blog? A. Because my blog is narratively driven, when I sit down to write it I often don't know where I'm going to wind up (and consequently, I have a lot of bits and pieces of things in my drafts folder that have never come to fruition). The book, which took 16 months or so to write, was also an evolutionary process involving the recesses of my memory and often stark realizations that I grew up thinking of food the way I did because of my parents' polar opposite relationships with it. Once I started writing though. N° de ref. de la librería 0000646

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Detalles bibliográficos

Título: Poor Man's Feast: A Love Story of Comfort, ...

Editorial: U.S.A.: Chronicle Books

Año de publicación: 2013

Encuadernación: Hardcover

Condición del libro:New

Condición de la sobrecubierta: New

Ejemplar firmado: Signed by Author(s)

Edición: 1st Edition

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Sinopsis:

From James Beard Award-winning writer Elissa Altman comes a story that marries wit to warmth, and flavor to passion. Born and raised in New York to a food-phobic mother and food-fanatical father, Elissa was trained early on that fancy is always best. After a childhood spent dining everywhere from Le Pavillion to La Grenouille, she devoted her life to all things gastronomical, from the rare game birds she served at elaborate dinner parties in an apartment so tiny that guests couldn't turn around to the eight timbale molds she bought while working at Dean & DeLuca, just so she could make tall food.

But love does strange things to people, and when Elissa met Susan — a small-town Connecticut Yankee with parsimonious tendencies and a devotion to simple living — it would change Elissa's relationship with food, and the people who taught her about it, forever. With tender and often hilarious honesty (and 27 delicious recipes), Poor Man's Feast is a universal tale of finding sustenance and peace in a world of excess and inauthenticity, and shows us how all our stories are inextricably bound up with what, and how, we feed ourselves and those we love.

Review:

Q&A with Elissa Altman

Q. How did you decide to start your blog, Poor Man's Feast, back in 2008?

A. I had just come off many years as a food writer for magazines, a stint as a restaurant critic, and a frequent food radio guest host, and I realized that there was very little public discourse about food as sustenance; instead, our public discussion about food was tied to food as fuel, food as health, food as entertainment. So when I started Poor Man's Feast in 2008, it was my goal to create a narrative about the way we feed ourselves and others in our homes, in our lives, in our collective past. I wanted to talk about simple food as the thing that brings us together as people, rather than divides us.

Q. You've been a cookbook editor, a columnist, a personal chef, and a caterer. How does blogging compare to your previous food careers?

A. It's very gratifying; for one thing, it provides an almost instantaneous connection to the public. For another, my readers can tell me what they like, what they expect, what they want with great immediacy. They keep me engaged and connected, and I've learned more about food and the way we eat in this country than I did when I was doing any of those other jobs. I'm still a cookbook editor, though, and I love that job because, quite simply, I adore the art and practice of making books. I'm a total bibliophile; it's an embarrassing addiction.

Q. Do you think your writing or the blog has evolved over the past five years? How so?

A. Gosh, I certainly hope so. When I started writing the blog, it tended to be very sly and sometimes even a bit attitudinal, and back then, that was okay. But what I think has happened --- at least what my readers have told me has happened --- is that it's become far more narratively driven instead of recipe driven; I'm telling more stories that revolve explicitly around food and family and life. Today I seem to be writing a lot more about what it means to be living and cooking in 2013 America while holding down a job (or three), commuting, finding a few more gray hairs in the morning, but always thinking about what's cooking at the end of the day.

Q. How was working on the book different than working on the blog? Were there any specific challenges to writing a book that you don't encounter on the blog?

A. Because my blog is narratively driven, when I sit down to write it I often don't know where I'm going to wind up (and consequently, I have a lot of bits and pieces of things in my drafts folder that have never come to fruition). The book, which took 16 months or so to write, was also an evolutionary process involving the recesses of my memory and often stark realizations that I grew up thinking of food the way I did because of my parents' polar opposite relationships with it. Once I started writing though and I really became entrenched in the process and the story, the book essentially wrote itself. I like to think, though, that my dear father, who I lost in 2002, was sitting on my shoulder, guiding me through the dark. He was a night fighter pilot in the Second World War, so that kind of makes sense.

Q. Who are some of your favorite food writers? Favorite food blogs?

A. There are so many folks whose work means so much to me: Laurie Colwin, MFK Fisher, John Thorne, Jim Harrison are my absolute favorites. The blogging world continues to just astound me--there's so much talent out there. But I find myself coming back over and over again to Sarah Searle (Yellow House) and Molly Wizenberg (Orangette) because I love longer-form narrative; they may be food writers, but they're also just really wonderful writers in the broader sense.

Q. Do you have any advice for someone thinking about starting a food blog or getting into food writing?

A. Read. Read everything you can get your hands on, and then read some more. Be generous with others and with yourself. And enjoy the process!

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Descripción de la librería

GAMBIT'S Collectibles Hi, my wife and I recently founded GAMBIT'S Collectibles on line business. We decided to name the business after one of our family members. We first met Gambit at an -Adopt a pet- show held by a pet store as a community services event. We were actually looking for a small dog, a lap dog if you will for her. As we looked at the puppies and older dogs we had a difficult time deciding. Gambit was sitting quietly in the corner as the other puppies yipped and barked as all the strangers coming by to look at them. I don't know if you believe in an emotional bond but there was definitely an immediate connection between Gambit and I. At first I just wanted to pick him up and take a closer look. When I did Gambit did something I will never forget. He held on to my arm with his paws wrapped around -clinging- to me. This connection created a strong bond between us. My wife tells people that I hogged the puppy and wandered off into a corner of the pet store with him so no one else could have a chance to pick him. I have to admit it is true. However, because we came for a different breed of dog we decided to wait until more dogs were brought to the event. So we went to lunch with plans to come back in an hour or so. I told myself that the puppy I liked so much would be long gone by then. Someone would pick him for sure. Who could resist? So with some trepidation I left it up to fate. Well, we ate our lunch and came back to the event in time to see the new dogs arriving at the pet store. We looked them over and considered a couple but I could not get Gambit out of my mind. So, I went to see if he was still in the pen they had for the puppies. Amazingly he was still there. I picked him up and we have been faithful friends every since. Our family loves Gambit and I am thankful for his unconditional love for our family every day. So, when we decided to create an on line business we needed a CEO and Gambit was elected. His bark is worse than his bite! Some of the proceeds from our sales will go the local animal shelter here in Colorado to give others a chance to adopt a pet and maybe they will be as lucky as we were. We are proud contributors to the local Humane Society and the business makes monthly contributions via the PAWS system.

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