A Monograph of the Trogonidae, or Family of Trogons: GOULD, John (1804-1881)

A Monograph of the Trogonidae, or Family of Trogons

GOULD, John (1804-1881)

Editorial: published by the Author, 1875
Usado / Folio / Cantidad: 0
Librería: Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA) (New York, NY, Estados Unidos de America)
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Descripción:

(21 1/2 x 14 1/2 inches). 47 hand-coloured lithographed plates after and by John Gould and W. Hart; and John Gould and H.C. Richter, printed by Hullmandel & Walton. Period full dark brown crushed morocco, covers elaborately bordered in gilt, spine in six compartments with raised bands, lettered in the second and fourth, the others with an overall repeat decoration in gilt, marbled endpapers, gilt edges Revised and expanded second edition of Gould's monograph on trogons, including the most beautiful depictions of these colourful tropical birds. As Gould states in his preface, this revised and expanded edition was "in reality a new publication, the plates having been redrawn, and many (i.e. 12) new species figured for the first time." The depiction of the birds is more elaborate than the first edition of 1838, with artfully arranged perches of tropical plants and occasional background landscapes. "The Trogons may dispute the palm of beauty with the Hummingbirds. Their plumage in certain parts shines with metallic brilliancy, and exhibits all the colours of the rainbow" (Introduction).The trogons depicted within this monograph are largely species resident of the Americas, including Mexico, Panama, Columbia, and Brazil. Anker 171; Fine Bird Books (1990), p. 101; Nissen IVB 381; Wood p. 365; Zimmer p. 261; Sauer 21. N° de ref. de la librería 26805

Detalles bibliográficos

Título: A Monograph of the Trogonidae, or Family of ...
Editorial: published by the Author
Año de publicación: 1875
Encuadernación: Folio
Edición: 1st Edition

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1.

GOULD, John (1804-1881).
Editorial: London: Richard and John E. Taylor, for the author, [1858]-1875. (1875)
Usado Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Arader Galleries - Aradernyc
(New York, NY, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción London: Richard and John E. Taylor, for the author, [1858]-1875., 1875. Folio (21 2/8 x 14 4/8 inches). 47 hand-colored lithographs, most heightened with gum arabic, after John Gould, H.C. Richter, and W. Hart. Contemporary dark green morocco gilt, all edges gilt (expertly rebacked to style, inner hinges strengthened, first and last blanks renewed). Provenance: with the Markree Castle library label of Bryan Ricco Cooper (1884-1930), politician in Ireland, dated 1913 on the front paste-down. Second edition, revised and expanded, originally published in three parts ?1836-1838. This new edition contains 11 new plates not included in the first edition. Gould's second monograph in which he introduces 12 species new to science. Trogons (and Quetzels) mostly inhabit tropical rainforests and get their name from the Greek ('Trogon') word for nibbling, referring to the way in which they gnaw holes in trees to make their nests. Initially employed as a taxidermist [he was known as the 'bird-stuffer'] by the Zoological Society, Gould's fascination with birds began in the "late 1820s [when] a collection of birds from the Himalayan mountains arrived at the Society's museum and Gould conceived the idea of publishing a volume of imperial folio sized hand-coloured lithographs of the eighty species, with figures of a hundred birds (A Century of Birds Hitherto Unfigured from the Himalaya Mountains, 1830-32). Gould's friend and mentor N. A. Vigors supplied the text. Elizabeth Gould made the drawings and transferred them to the large lithographic stones. Having failed to find a publisher, Gould undertook to publish the work himself; it appeared in twenty monthly parts, four plates to a part, and was completed ahead of schedule. "With this volume Gould initiated a format of publishing that he was to continue for the next fifty years, although for future works he was to write his own text. Eventually fifty imperial folio volumes were published on the birds of the world, except Africa, and on the mammals of Australia-he always had a number of works in progress at the same time. Several smaller volumes, the majority not illustrated, were published, and he also presented more than 300 scientific papers. "His hand-coloured lithographic plates, more than 3300 in total, are called 'Gould plates'. Although he did not paint the final illustrations, this description is largely correct: he was the collector (especially in Australia) or purchaser of the specimens, the taxonomist, the publisher, the agent, and the distributor of the parts or volumes. He never claimed he was the artist for these plates, but repeatedly wrote of the 'rough sketches' he made from which, with reference to the specimens, his artists painted the finished drawings. The design and natural arrangement of the birds on the plates was due to the genius of John Gould, and a Gould plate has a distinctive beauty and quality. His wife was his first artist. She was followed by Edward Lear, Henry Constantine Richter, William Matthew Hart, and Joseph Wolf" (Gordon C. Sauer for DNB). From the distinguished library of Bryan Cooper of Markree Castle, Irish politician, veteran of the Gallipoli campaign, and member of the literary elite of Ireland that included W.B. Yeats and Lady Gregory. Anker 171; "Fine Bird Books" (1990) p.101; Nissen 381; Sauer 4; Zimmer p. 253. Nº de ref. de la librería 72nhr152

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2.

GOULD, John (1804-1881).
Editorial: London: Richard and John E. Taylor, for the author, [1858]-1875 (1875)
Usado Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Arader Galleries - Aradernyc
(New York, NY, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción London: Richard and John E. Taylor, for the author, [1858]-1875, 1875. Folio (21 2/8 x 14 4/8 inches). 47 hand-colored lithographs, most heightened with gum arabic, after John Gould, H.C. Richter, and W. Hart. Contemporary dark green morocco gilt, all edges gilt (expertly rebacked to style, inner hinges strengthened, first and last blanks renewed). Second edition, revised and expanded, originally published in three parts ?1836-1838. This new edition contains 11 new plates not included in the first edition. Gould's second monograph in which he introduces 12 species new to science. Trogons (and Quetzels) mostly inhabit tropical rainforests and get their name from the Greek ('Trogon') word for nibbling, referring to the way in which they gnaw holes in trees to make their nests. Initially employed as a taxidermist [he was known as the 'bird-stuffer'] by the Zoological Society, Gould's fascination with birds began in the "late 1820s [when] a collection of birds from the Himalayan mountains arrived at the Society's museum and Gould conceived the idea of publishing a volume of imperial folio sized hand-coloured lithographs of the eighty species, with figures of a hundred birds (A Century of Birds Hitherto Unfigured from the Himalaya Mountains, 1830-32). Gould's friend and mentor N. A. Vigors supplied the text. Elizabeth Gould made the drawings and transferred them to the large lithographic stones. Having failed to find a publisher, Gould undertook to publish the work himself; it appeared in twenty monthly parts, four plates to a part, and was completed ahead of schedule. "With this volume Gould initiated a format of publishing that he was to continue for the next fifty years, although for future works he was to write his own text. Eventually fifty imperial folio volumes were published on the birds of the world, except Africa, and on the mammals of Australia-he always had a number of works in progress at the same time. Several smaller volumes, the majority not illustrated, were published, and he also presented more than 300 scientific papers. "His hand-coloured lithographic plates, more than 3300 in total, are called 'Gould plates'. Although he did not paint the final illustrations, this description is largely correct: he was the collector (especially in Australia) or purchaser of the specimens, the taxonomist, the publisher, the agent, and the distributor of the parts or volumes. He never claimed he was the artist for these plates, but repeatedly wrote of the 'rough sketches' he made from which, with reference to the specimens, his artists painted the finished drawings. The design and natural arrangement of the birds on the plates was due to the genius of John Gould, and a Gould plate has a distinctive beauty and quality. His wife was his first artist. She was followed by Edward Lear, Henry Constantine Richter, William Matthew Hart, and Joseph Wolf" (Gordon C. Sauer for DNB). Anker 171; "Fine Bird Books" (1990) p.101; Nissen 381; Sauer 4; Zimmer p. 253. Nº de ref. de la librería 72nhr153

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3.

GOULD, John (1804-1881).
Editorial: London: Richard and John E. Taylor, for the author, 1858-1875. (1875)
Usado Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Arader Galleries - Aradernyc
(New York, NY, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción London: Richard and John E. Taylor, for the author, 1858-1875., 1875. Folio. 47 hand-colored lithographs after John Gould, H.C. Richter, and W. Hart. Contemporary green morocco gilt, all edges gilt. Provenance: from the library of the Wadsworth Athenaeum, the gift of J. Pierpont Morgan in memory of his father, with an engraved bookplate commemorating the bequest on the front paste-down of each volume. Second edition, revised and expanded, originally published in three parts ?1836-1838. This new edition contains 11 new plates not included in the first edition. Gould's second monograph in which he introduces 12 species new to science. Trogons (and Quetzels) mostly inhabit tropical rain forests and get their name from the Greek ('Trogon') word for nibbling, referring to the way in which they gnaw holes in trees to make their nests. Purchased by J. Pierpont Morgan, one of the most highly discriminating collectors in American history, from Henry Sotheran & Co. on June 15, 1899 (who bought the entire stock of Gould's works and copyrights, and who with the help of Sharpe completed Gould's unfinished works), and subsequently donated it to the Wadsworth Athenaeum in the name of his father. Initially employed as a taxidermist [he was known as the 'bird-stuffer'] by the Zoological Society, Gould's fascination with birds began in the "late 1820s [when] a collection of birds from the Himalayan mountains arrived at the Society's museum and Gould conceived the idea of publishing a volume of imperial folio sized hand-coloured lithographs of the eighty species, with figures of a hundred birds (A Century of Birds Hitherto Unfigured from the Himalaya Mountains, 1830-32). Gould's friend and mentor N. A. Vigors supplied the text. Elizabeth Gould made the drawings and transferred them to the large lithographic stones. Having failed to find a publisher, Gould undertook to publish the work himself; it appeared in twenty monthly parts, four plates to a part, and was completed ahead of schedule. "With this volume Gould initiated a format of publishing that he was to continue for the next fifty years, although for future works he was to write his own text. Eventually fifty imperial folio volumes were published on the birds of the world, except Africa, and on the mammals of Australia-he always had a number of works in progress at the same time. Several smaller volumes, the majority not illustrated, were published, and he also presented more than 300 scientific papers. "His hand-coloured lithographic plates, more than 3300 in total, are called 'Gould plates'. Although he did not paint the final illustrations, this description is largely correct: he was the collector (especially in Australia) or purchaser of the specimens, the taxonomist, the publisher, the agent, and the distributor of the parts or volumes. He never claimed he was the artist for these plates, but repeatedly wrote of the 'rough sketches' he made from which, with reference to the specimens, his artists painted the finished drawings. The design and natural arrangement of the birds on the plates was due to the genius of John Gould, and a Gould plate has a distinctive beauty and quality. His wife was his first artist. She was followed by Edward Lear, Henry Constantine Richter, William Matthew Hart, and Joseph Wolf" (Gordon C. Sauer for DNB). AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE SET. Anker 171; "Fine Bird Books" (1990) p.101; Nissen 381; Sauer 4; Zimmer p. 253. Catalogued by Kate Hunter. Nº de ref. de la librería 000098

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4.

GOULD, John (1804-1881).
Editorial: London: by the Author, 1835-1838. (1838)
Usado Tapa blanda Cantidad: 1
Librería
Arader Galleries - Aradernyc
(New York, NY, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción London: by the Author, 1835-1838., 1838. Parts II and III only (of three) in one volume. Folio (21 x 14 inches). Part III with general title-page, dedication, preface and list of the subscribers; all the relevant text to the two parts present. 25 of 36 hand-colored lithographs after John Gould, H.C. Richter, and W. Hart. Contemporary green morocco gilt, with original printed upper covers of the wrappers to the two parts bound in and laid down, all edges gilt. Provenance: Contemporary ownership inscription of John James Audubon (1785-1851), American Ornithologist and painter, on the original front wrapper to part II, a gift from the author; engraved bookplate of Maria R. Audubon (1843-1925), Audubon's artist daughter on the verso of the original front wrapper to part II; facsimile note of authentication from Audubon's grandson Leonard B. Audubon on the verso of the front free endpaper; Mr. Hallstrom; bookplate of the Arcadian Library (Natural History Collection), the leading repository of rare books recording the relations and influences between Europe and the Arab and Islamic world, on the front paste-down. JOHN JAMES AUDUBON'S COPY, with his ownership inscription signature dated "March 21st 1836. London". A gift from one great ornithologist to another: "Gould gave Audubon two parts each of his "Trogonidae" and "Icones avium", and also the two rare cancelled parts of "Birds of Australia and adjacent islands", before Gould left for his Australian adventure .Mr. Len Audubon, a great-grandson of J. J. Audubon, was born in Australia and had these books in his possession." (Sauer). In addition Audubon has underlined a passage in the text opposite the "Trogon Narina" plate that refers to the young chicks: ". at the moment the young are excluded [from the nest] they take flight and follow their parents for a considerable period.", and written the following penciled note: "This beats my little humming Birds which cannot fly until they are one week old. Pray show this Paragraph to Charles Watterton "Esquire" of Walton Hall". A facsimile of the typed authenticity statement signed by Leonard B. Audubon states: "The books were given to my great grandfather, John James Audubon, an American Ornithologist and Painter. Gould at the time was painting along similar lines, and they exchanged copies of their works. These particular books were sent out to Australia forty years ago, and were held in the Audubon family until this year when Mr. Hallstrom purchased the books from the great grandson of John James Audubon. 16.3.1950". Audubon and Gould were subscribers to each other's works, Audubon to Gould's first major work "A Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains" (London: 1831-1833), and to "The Birds of Europe" (1832-1837), and is said to have influenced Gould's artistic style in the latter, encouraging him to make the subjects of his plates more lively and natural. However he received scant acknowledgement from Gould: Audubon is credited in Gould's preface along with twenty others for "the warm interest which they have at all times taken in the present work". In a letter to his great friend the clergyman and naturalist John Bachman dated 30th April 1835 Audubon wrote of Gould: ". [he] is a man of great industry and has the advantage of the Zoological Society, museums, gardens, etc, and is in correspondence with Temminck, Jardine, Selby, James Wilson and the rest of the scientific gentry, his wife makes his drawings on stone. She is a plain, fine woman, and although their works are not quite up to Nature, both deserve great credit" (reported by Herrick). Gould's second monograph in which he introduces 12 species new to science. Trogons (and Quetzels) mostly inhabit tropical rainforests and get their name from the Greek ('Trogon') word for nibbling, referring to the way in which they gnaw holes in trees to make their nests. Anker 171; Nissen IVB 381; Sauer reporting Tom Iredale's article "Audubon in Australia" from the "Australian Zoologist" 11: 318-21, 1951. Catalogued by Kate Hun. Nº de ref. de la librería 001265

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