THE IRISH NATIONAL INVINCIBLES AND THEIR TIMES English Edition with Appendices and Index

Tynan, Patrick J. P.

Editorial: Chatham and Company, 1894
Usado / Hardcover / Cantidad: 0
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xxxii, 591 pages; Clean and tight in the publisher's original binding of dark green cloth spine and light green cloth covered boards, bright gilt lettering at spine. Illustrated with frontispiece portrait of the author and seven additional portraits of the "Invincibles," including Parnell, Brady, Murphy, Curley, O'Donnell, Williams and Kinsella. This book is part of a story which had its defining moment twelve years before, in Dublin's Phoenix Park. In this large, old walled park near the city, two high officials of the British Goverment -- Lord Frederick Cavendish, the Chief Secretary for Ireland, and Thomas Henry Burke, the Under-Secretary for Ireland, were stabbed to death with surgical knives while walking from Dublin Castle. The assassination of these two men was carried out by members of the "Irish National Invincibles" -- a radical splinter group of the Irish Republican Brotherhood. This splinter group of assassins had sought to kill then-Chief Secretary William Edward "Buckshot" Forster -- as well as assorted jurists, informers, and others who arose as targets from time to time. Numerous efforts to eliminate "Buckshot" Forster failed, but members of the group did succeed in fatally stabbing Lord Frederick Cavendish, on his very first day in Ireland -- Saturday, 6 May 1882. Joe Brady struck first, stabbing Burke, followed in short order by Tim Kelly, who knifed the newly-arrived Cavendish. The British Press fanned the genuine outrage in England, but large elements of the Irish public felt that the so-called Phoenix Park Murders were an outrage, as well -- particularly Charles Stewart Parnell, whose eloquent speech condemning these acts elevated his reputation as a statesman on both sides of the Irish sea. Superintendent Mallon of "G" Division of the Dublin Metropolitan Police had a number of suspects arrested. Mallon managed to extract "cooperation" from Invincibles' leader, James Carey, and Michael Kavanagh -- and as a result, the men who actually wielded the surgical knives, Kelly and Brady were hanged in the spring of 1883, along with three other conspirators. At the end of that July, Invincible leader-turned-stool pigeon James Carey was shot and killed by an assassin from Donegal, Patrick O'Donnell -- (who, in turn, was arrested, sent back to London, convicted at the Old Bailey and was hanged at the end of the year). Other members of the Invincible conspiracy received long prison sentences, but it appears that no member of the group's founding executive was ever put on trial. Several made their way to America -- John Walsh, Patrick Egan, John Sheridan, Frank Byrne, and the author of this book: Patrick Joseph Percy Tynan. As stated in the preface of this book, the group who escaped to America had intended to circulate this text as a means of raising funds for continuing anti-British activities in Ireland. But, for various reasons, publication was delayed for about six years. Ultimately, the American and London editions were published roughly simutaneously, in 1894. The American version of this text was published by the an entity called "Irish National Invincible Publishing Company" in New York, and was probably issued by subscription (and sold at fund-raising lectures). The subtitle to that New York version is quite detailed -- ["Three decades of struggle against the foreign conspirators in Dublin castle; the parliamentary provincialists' agitation to reform foreign rule, from Isaac Butt's movement in 1870 to Gladstone's bill in 1886. The Irish nationalists' preparations to take the field against the invader's forces in 1865, 1866, and 1867. Guerrilla warfare of the Irish nation in 1882, 1883, and 1884; with an addendum: Ireland at the close of 1893."] This verbiage helps convey that the scope of this long book goes well beyond the Phoenix Park Murders, but was essentially a history of Anglo-Irish tensions in the last third of the nineteenth century. The New York edition had 660 pages, plus xxvii pp. of preface, and. N° de ref. de la librería

Detalles bibliográficos

Título: THE IRISH NATIONAL INVINCIBLES AND THEIR ...
Editorial: Chatham and Company
Año de publicación: 1894
Encuadernación: Hardcover
Condición del libro: Very Good+
Edición: First Edition.

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Tynan, Patrick J. P.
Editorial: Chatham and Company, Covent Garden (1894)
Usado Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Antiquarian Bookshop
(Washington, DC, Estados Unidos de America)
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Descripción Chatham and Company, Covent Garden, 1894. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: Very Good+. First Edition. xxxii, 591 pages; Clean and tight in the publisher's original binding of dark green cloth spine and light green cloth covered boards, bright gilt lettering at spine. Illustrated with frontispiece portrait of the author and seven additional portraits of the "Invincibles," including Parnell, Brady, Murphy, Curley, O'Donnell, Williams and Kinsella. This book is part of a story which had its defining moment twelve years before, in Dublin's Phoenix Park. In this large, old walled park near the city, two high officials of the British Goverment -- Lord Frederick Cavendish, the Chief Secretary for Ireland, and Thomas Henry Burke, the Under-Secretary for Ireland, were stabbed to death with surgical knives while walking from Dublin Castle. The assassination of these two men was carried out by members of the "Irish National Invincibles" -- a radical splinter group of the Irish Republican Brotherhood. This splinter group of assassins had sought to kill then-Chief Secretary William Edward "Buckshot" Forster -- as well as assorted jurists, informers, and others who arose as targets from time to time. Numerous efforts to eliminate "Buckshot" Forster failed, but members of the group did succeed in fatally stabbing Lord Frederick Cavendish, on his very first day in Ireland -- Saturday, 6 May 1882. Joe Brady struck first, stabbing Burke, followed in short order by Tim Kelly, who knifed the newly-arrived Cavendish. The British Press fanned the genuine outrage in England, but large elements of the Irish public felt that the so-called Phoenix Park Murders were an outrage, as well -- particularly Charles Stewart Parnell, whose eloquent speech condemning these acts elevated his reputation as a statesman on both sides of the Irish sea. Superintendent Mallon of "G" Division of the Dublin Metropolitan Police had a number of suspects arrested. Mallon managed to extract "cooperation" from Invincibles' leader, James Carey, and Michael Kavanagh -- and as a result, the men who actually wielded the surgical knives, Kelly and Brady were hanged in the spring of 1883, along with three other conspirators. At the end of that July, Invincible leader-turned-stool pigeon James Carey was shot and killed by an assassin from Donegal, Patrick O'Donnell -- (who, in turn, was arrested, sent back to London, convicted at the Old Bailey and was hanged at the end of the year). Other members of the Invincible conspiracy received long prison sentences, but it appears that no member of the group's founding executive was ever put on trial. Several made their way to America -- John Walsh, Patrick Egan, John Sheridan, Frank Byrne, and the author of this book: Patrick Joseph Percy Tynan. As stated in the preface of this book, the group who escaped to America had intended to circulate this text as a means of raising funds for continuing anti-British activities in Ireland. But, for various reasons, publication was delayed for about six years. Ultimately, the American and London editions were published roughly simutaneously, in 1894. The American version of this text was published by the an entity called "Irish National Invincible Publishing Company" in New York, and was probably issued by subscription (and sold at fund-raising lectures). The subtitle to that New York version is quite detailed -- ["Three decades of struggle against the foreign conspirators in Dublin castle; the parliamentary provincialists' agitation to reform foreign rule, from Isaac Butt's movement in 1870 to Gladstone's bill in 1886. The Irish nationalists' preparations to take the field against the invader's forces in 1865, 1866, and 1867. Guerrilla warfare of the Irish nation in 1882, 1883, and 1884; with an addendum: Ireland at the close of 1893."] This verbiage helps convey that the scope of this long book goes well beyond the Phoenix Park Murders, but was essentially a history of Anglo-Irish tensions in the last third of the nineteenth century. The New York edition had 660 pages, plus xxvii pp. of preface, and. Nº de ref. de la librería 41498

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