Artificial scripts used in natural languages: Hangul, Shavian alphabet, Deseret alphabet, Canadian Aboriginal syllabics, N'Ko script

 
9781233051892: Artificial scripts used in natural languages: Hangul, Shavian alphabet, Deseret alphabet, Canadian Aboriginal syllabics, N'Ko script
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 28. Chapters: Hangul, Shavian alphabet, Deseret alphabet, Canadian Aboriginal syllabics, N'Ko script, Mandombe script, Cree syllabics, Fraser alphabet, Carrier syllabics, Hunminjeongeum Society, Varang Kshiti, Coorgi-Cox alphabet, Testerian. Excerpt: Hangul ( ; Korean: 한글 Hangeul/Han'gŭl (in South Korea)) or Chosongul (Korean pronunciation: ; Korean: 조선글 Chosŏn'gŭl/Joseongeul (in North Korea)) is the native alphabet of the Korean language, as distinguished from the logographic Hanja and phonetic systems. It was created in the mid-15th century, and is now the official script of both North Korea and South Korea, being co-official in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture of Jilin Province, People's Republic of China and currently proposed as an official script for the Cia-Cia language of Buton, South East Sulawesi Province, Indonesia. Hangul is a phonemic alphabet organized into syllabic blocks. Each block consists of at least two of the 24 Hangul letters (jamo), with at least one each of the 14 consonants and 10 vowels. These syllabic blocks can be written horizontally from left to right as well as vertically from top to bottom in columns from right to left. Originally, the alphabet had several additional letters (see obsolete jamo). For a phonological description of the letters, see Korean phonology. The word hangeul, written in Hangul North Koreans prefer to call it Chosŏn'gŭl (), for reasons related to the different names of Korea.The original name was Hunminjeongeum (훈민정음; 訓民正音; see history). Due to objections to the names Hangeul, Chosŏn'gŭl, and urigeul (우리글) (see below) by Koreans in China, the otherwise uncommon short form jeongeum may be used as a neutral name in some international contexts. Until the early twentieth century, Hanguel was denigrated as vulgar by the literate elite who preferred the traditional hanja writ...

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