The Sky-Lark; a Choice Selection of the most admired popular songs, heroic, plaintive, sentimental, humourous, and Bacchanalian Arranged for the violin, flute, and voice

Anonymous

Editorial: Thomas Tegg, 1825
Usado / Hardcover / Cantidad: 0
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Descripción:

322 pages; Contemporary maroon half roan leather over pink cloth with a floral decorative pattern impressed in blind. Flat spine, plain endpapers, edges decoratively stained red. A copy with wear and damage to the binding, the spine is fragmented, missing a large section at the top and a smaller portion at the center (remnants are loose along one hinge). The letter-press title page (undated, as in all copies, pace OCLC) has a portion of the blank upper margin torn or cut away. Apparently, their was once an engraved title page -- now missing in this copy. The title page endpaper and front boad are nearly detached -- the remaining text, with substantial portions in musical notation, is complete and in good condition. A saving grace of this worn and damaged copy is the fine woodcut bookplate of Kate Lee mounted to the front paste-down endpaper. This is a handsome and striking image, with a depiction of a harp with a woman's head at the center, flying around which are song birds, all within a frame of branches and leaves -- designed by Selwyn Image (signed with his monogram "SI" in the image). Kate Lee, born Catharine Anna Spooner, (9 March 1858 - 25 July 1904) was a singer and, briefly, one of the most important folksong collectors in modern English history. She entered the Royal Academy of Music in January 1876 with the ambition to become a singer; she discontinued her studies in order to marry the lawyer Arthur Morier Lee (1847–1909) in December 1877, but retained all of her interests in music and singing. After having two children Kate Lee studied at the Royal College of Music from 1887 to 1889 and became a professional singer in 1895. Mrs. Kate Lee and Mr. Alfred Percival Graves founded the Folk-Song Society, ("with the kind advice and help of Mr. Fuller Maitland"); it was fully inaugurated June 16, 1898. At the first general meeting, "The honorary secretary of the Society, Mrs. Kate Lee, then contributed a very amusing and highly interesting paper on "Some Experiences of a Folksong Collector." (which was also printed in the first number of the society's "Journal"). This contains a report of her famous discovery of the singing "Copper" family. This find of Kate Lee's took place in Rottingdean, near Brighton, where a colony of various persons interested in the arts had gathered around Edward Burne-Jones, who discovered the village while walking the Downs. Kate Lee and her husband were staying with Sir Edward Carson, famed London Lawyer (and future founder of Northern Ireland). At Sir Edward's house, Kate Lee recorded the singing of two brothers James and Thomas Copper in 1897. They were invited to 'the big house' because the place they normally sang, the 'Black'Un'-- (the Black Horse public house) -- was not considered a 'fit' place for a middle-class woman. "They are very proud of their Sussex songs, and sang them with an enthusiasm perfectly grand to hear. When I questioned them as to how many they thought they could sing, they said they thought about a hundred! You had only got to start either of them on the subject and they commenced at once. "Oh, Mr. Copper, can you sing me a love song, or a sea song, or a plough song?" It did not matter what it was, they looked at each other significantly, and, with perfectly grave faces, off they would go. Mr. Thomas Copper's voice was as flexible as a bird's. He always sang the under part of a song like a sort of obbligato, impossible at a first hearing to take down. To show you the beautiful variety of these songs—which, by-the bye, I collected in November last— I should like to say that another man came to me with a song which he called " Judy Credio." I asked him what the title meant before hearing the song; he said he hadn't the faintest idea, but he thought it was the name of a girl, an Irish girl. Then another man present said, " Oh, no. it's not the name of a girl; it means 'What a Jew believes.'" This shows that often words become perverted in folk-songs." As a family, the Copp. N° de ref. de la librería

Detalles bibliográficos

Título: The Sky-Lark; a Choice Selection of the most...
Editorial: Thomas Tegg
Año de publicación: 1825
Encuadernación: Hardcover
Condición del libro: Good
Edición: First Edition; First Printing.

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Anonymous
Editorial: Thomas Tegg, London (1825)
Usado Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Antiquarian Bookshop
(Washington, DC, Estados Unidos de America)
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Descripción Thomas Tegg, London, 1825. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: Good. First Edition; First Printing. 322 pages; Contemporary maroon half roan leather over pink cloth with a floral decorative pattern impressed in blind. Flat spine, plain endpapers, edges decoratively stained red. A copy with wear and damage to the binding, the spine is fragmented, missing a large section at the top and a smaller portion at the center (remnants are loose along one hinge). The letter-press title page (undated, as in all copies, pace OCLC) has a portion of the blank upper margin torn or cut away. Apparently, their was once an engraved title page -- now missing in this copy. The title page endpaper and front boad are nearly detached -- the remaining text, with substantial portions in musical notation, is complete and in good condition. A saving grace of this worn and damaged copy is the fine woodcut bookplate of Kate Lee mounted to the front paste-down endpaper. This is a handsome and striking image, with a depiction of a harp with a woman's head at the center, flying around which are song birds, all within a frame of branches and leaves -- designed by Selwyn Image (signed with his monogram "SI" in the image). Kate Lee, born Catharine Anna Spooner, (9 March 1858 - 25 July 1904) was a singer and, briefly, one of the most important folksong collectors in modern English history. She entered the Royal Academy of Music in January 1876 with the ambition to become a singer; she discontinued her studies in order to marry the lawyer Arthur Morier Lee (1847–1909) in December 1877, but retained all of her interests in music and singing. After having two children Kate Lee studied at the Royal College of Music from 1887 to 1889 and became a professional singer in 1895. Mrs. Kate Lee and Mr. Alfred Percival Graves founded the Folk-Song Society, ("with the kind advice and help of Mr. Fuller Maitland"); it was fully inaugurated June 16, 1898. At the first general meeting, "The honorary secretary of the Society, Mrs. Kate Lee, then contributed a very amusing and highly interesting paper on "Some Experiences of a Folksong Collector." (which was also printed in the first number of the society's "Journal"). This contains a report of her famous discovery of the singing "Copper" family. This find of Kate Lee's took place in Rottingdean, near Brighton, where a colony of various persons interested in the arts had gathered around Edward Burne-Jones, who discovered the village while walking the Downs. Kate Lee and her husband were staying with Sir Edward Carson, famed London Lawyer (and future founder of Northern Ireland). At Sir Edward's house, Kate Lee recorded the singing of two brothers James and Thomas Copper in 1897. They were invited to 'the big house' because the place they normally sang, the 'Black'Un'-- (the Black Horse public house) -- was not considered a 'fit' place for a middle-class woman. "They are very proud of their Sussex songs, and sang them with an enthusiasm perfectly grand to hear. When I questioned them as to how many they thought they could sing, they said they thought about a hundred! You had only got to start either of them on the subject and they commenced at once. "Oh, Mr. Copper, can you sing me a love song, or a sea song, or a plough song?" It did not matter what it was, they looked at each other significantly, and, with perfectly grave faces, off they would go. Mr. Thomas Copper's voice was as flexible as a bird's. He always sang the under part of a song like a sort of obbligato, impossible at a first hearing to take down. To show you the beautiful variety of these songs—which, by-the bye, I collected in November last— I should like to say that another man came to me with a song which he called " Judy Credio." I asked him what the title meant before hearing the song; he said he hadn't the faintest idea, but he thought it was the name of a girl, an Irish girl. Then another man present said, " Oh, no. it's not the name of a girl; it means 'What a Jew believes.'" This shows that often words become perverted in folk-songs." As a family, the Copp. Nº de ref. de la librería 41588

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