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Russia's Factory Children (Hardcover)

Boris B. Gorshkov

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ISBN 10: 0822943832 / ISBN 13: 9780822943839
Nuevos Condición: New Encuadernación de tapa dura
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Descripción

Hardcover. At the height of the Russian industrial revolution, legions of children toiled in factories, accounting for fifteen percent of the workforce. Yet, by the end of the nineteenth.Shipping may be from our Sydney, NSW warehouse or from our UK or US warehouse, depending on stock availability. 216 pages. N° de ref. de la librería 9780822943839

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Detalles bibliográficos

Título: Russia's Factory Children (Hardcover)

Año de publicación: 2009

Encuadernación: Hardcover

Condición del libro:New

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Sinopsis:

Book by Gorshkov Boris B

Críticas:

Makes an important contribution to the growing field of children s history, as well as creating a cogent case for a balanced, and historically sensitive, understanding of late imperial Russian social relations. " American Historical Review"" Gorshkov s interesting and conceptually provocative book examines child labor in the countryside, the impact of industrialization, the difficult working conditions for children in factories, and, finally, the concerns of both educated society and officialdom that led to new labor laws. " The Journal of Modern History"" Gorshkov has managed in this concise book to add a new dimension to the history of Russian labour, as well as contributing to current debates about the role of the state, the growth of civil society, and the perception of childhood. " Canadian Slavonic Papers"" Pathbreaking. One of the most important aspects of Gorshkov s study is its use of comparative analysis. This book will force readers to consider how accurately Russia is placed (or not placed) in its European context both in the story of Russia s industrialization and in broader fields such as world history or labor history. " The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review"" Succeeds both as Russian history and as a comparative complement to studies of child labor, rform, civil society, and industrialization elsewhere. Highly recommended. " Choice"" Gorshkov's seminal study of child labor in late imperial Russia displays impeccable scholarship. After analyzing preindustrial child labor, he examines legislative and public debates which resulted in the 1882 Child Labor Law. Gorshkov concludes the work with analysis of the impact of the law and references to the question of child labor in our contemporary world. Alice K. Pate, Columbus State University" This balanced and judicious survey provides an overview of child labor practices and legislation in the century leading up to the Russian Revolution. Gorshkov argues that the relationship with the autocracy was more 'interactional' than confrontational, and that the Russian state was capable of responding positively to public pressure. Adopting a comparative framework in his investigation of child labor laws, he problematizes the notion of 'Russian backwardness' and seeks to normalize Russian history. Ben Eklof, Indiana University" Much more than a pathbreaking history of child labor in Russia, this book sheds new light on a stunning array of topics, from the pioneering medical studies that identified children's distinctive brain functions and physical capacities, to the radicalizing of a generation of young Russian factory workers. You need not be a Russian historian to benefit from this book's insights into the development of social welfare policy, the construction of age categories, and the roots of revolution. Steven Mintz, Columbia University" "Makes an important contribution to the growing field of children's history, as well as creating a cogent case for a balanced, and historically sensitive, understanding of late imperial Russian social relations.""--American Historical Review" "Gorshkov's seminal study of child labor in late imperial Russia displays impeccable scholarship. After analyzing preindustrial child labor, he examines legislative and public debates which resulted in the 1882 Child Labor Law. Gorshkov concludes the work with analysis of the impact of the law and references to the question of child labor in our contemporary world."--Alice K. Pate, Columbus State University "This balanced and judicious survey provides an overview of child labor practices and legislation in the century leading up to the Russian Revolution. Gorshkov argues that the relationship with the autocracy was more 'interactional' than confrontational, and that the Russian state was capable of responding positively to public pressure. Adopting a comparative framework in his investigation of child labor laws, he problematizes the notion of 'Russian backwardness' and seeks to normalize Russian history."--Ben Eklof, Indiana University "Much more than a pathbreaking history of child labor in Russia, this book sheds new light on a stunning array of topics, from the pioneering medical studies that identified children's distinctive brain functions and physical capacities, to the radicalizing of a generation of young Russian factory workers. You need not be a Russian historian to benefit from this book's insights into the development of social welfare policy, the construction of age categories, and the roots of revolution."--Steven Mintz, Columbia University "Gorshkov's interesting and conceptually provocative book examines child labor in the countryside, the impact of industrialization, the difficult working conditions for children in factories, and, finally, the concerns of both educated society and officialdom that led to new labor laws.""--The Journal of Modern History" "Gorshkov has managed in this concise book to add a new dimension to the history of Russian labour, as well as contributing to current debates about the role of the state, the growth of civil society, and the perception of childhood.""--Canadian Slavonic Papers" "Pathbreaking. One of the most important aspects of Gorshkov's study is its use of comparative analysis. This book will force readers to consider how accurately Russia is placed (or not placed) in its European context both in the story of Russia's industrialization and in broader fields such as world history or labor history.""--The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review" "Succeeds both as Russian history and as a comparative complement to studies of child labor, rform, civil society, and industrialization elsewhere. Highly recommended.""--Choice" "Succeeds both as Russian history and as a comparative complement to studies of child labor, rform, civil society, and industrialization elsewhere. Highly recommended." "-Choice" "This balanced and judicious survey provides an overview of child labor practices and legislation in the century leading up to the Russian Revolution. Gorshkov argues that the relationship with the autocracy was more 'interactional' than confrontational, and that the Russian state was capable of responding positively to public pressure. Adopting a comparative framework in his investigation of child labor laws, he problematizes the notion of 'Russian backwardness' and seeks to normalize Russian history." -Ben Eklof, Indiana University "Gorshkov's seminal study of child labor in late imperial Russia displays impeccable scholarship. After analyzing preindustrial child labor, he examines legislative and public debates which resulted in the 1882 Child Labor Law. Gorshkov concludes the work with analysis of the impact of the law and references to the question of child labor in our contemporary world." -Alice K. Pate, Columbus State University "Much more than a pathbreaking history of child labor in Russia, this book sheds new light on a stunning array of topics, from the pioneering medical studies that identified children's distinctive brain functions and physical capacities, to the radicalizing of a generation of young Russian factory workers. You need not be a Russian historian to benefit from this book's insights into the development of social welfare policy, the construction of age categories, and the roots of revolution." -Steven Mintz, Columbia University

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