The Paradise Lost of Milton. With illustrations by John Martin

Milton

Editorial: Henry Washborne, 1858
Usado / Cantidad: 0
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28 cm, half leather binding, 373 pp. Ills.: black and white illustrations. Cond.: goed / good. The 24 engravings are of an excellent beauty. The leather is a bit worn on the edges, but in an overall good condition. N° de ref. de la librería

Detalles bibliográficos

Título: The Paradise Lost of Milton. With ...
Editorial: Henry Washborne
Año de publicación: 1858


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1.

John Martin] MILTON, John (1608-1674)
Editorial: Printed for Henry Washbourne & Co. 25, Ivy Lane, Paternoster Row MDCCCLIII [1853], London (1853)
Usado Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Fine Editions Ltd
(New York, NY, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Printed for Henry Washbourne & Co. 25, Ivy Lane, Paternoster Row MDCCCLIII [1853], London, 1853. Morocco. Estado de conservación: Near Fine+. Early Reprint. Handsomely bound edition of Milton's great epic poem, with John Martin's evocative, atmospheric mezzotints, "without doubt one of the most significant series of British book illustrations ever to have been produced" (Campbell), "one of the great publishing enterprises of the [Romantic] age." (Ray) 4to: [8],373,[3]pp, with 24 full-page, tissue-guarded mezzotint engravings (including frontispiece), by John Martin, originally designed for the octavo edition of 1827. (According to Lowndes, the plates were retouched for this and the first Washbourne edition, of 1849.) Full contemporary black morocco, covers elaborately framed in gilt, spines richly gilt in six compartments, gilt lettering direct to the second, all edges gilt. Provenance: signatures of A. Thomas, 1856, and A. W. Thomas, 1873, to title page; steel-engraved book plate (dated 1889) of John Frederick Nankivell, Ilfracombe Hotel, North Devon, to front fly leaf. An excellent copy, barring prominent tide marks to versos of frontispiece and first two plates, lightly transferred to rectos. But pages and remaining plates clean and bright with only occasional marginal foxing. A quite uncommon edition: Copac records only two copies (Cambridge, Oxford), OCLC adds one other (Berlin). Lowndes 1560. Allibone, p. 1300. Ray, 69A. Campbell, John Martin, Visionary Printmaker, pp. 38-41. In 1823, Martin was commissioned by a little known American publisher named Septimus Prowett to illustrate Milton's Paradise Lost. Before Martin had even completed the suite of 24 engravings, Prowett commissioned a second set on smaller plates. First published in two two-volume editions, imperial quarto (the large plates) and tall imperial octavo (the small), in 1827, with six more formats appearing through 1853. "The apocalyptic romanticism of [Martin's] conceptions had many sources: the monumental buildings of London, the engravings of Piranesi, published volumes of eastern views, even incandescent gas, coalpit accidents, and Brunel's newly constructed Thames Tunnel. The resulting illustrations may be heterogeneous, but they are also unforgettable" (Ray) Adds Campbell: "The greatest significance of Martin's illustrations, however, was in their spectacular visionary content. Martin laid before his public the spectacular settings of the epic tale, the open voids of the Creation, the vast vaulted caverns of Hell vanishing into the utter blackness of Chaos, the daunting scale of the city of Pandemonium, and the sweeping beauty of Heaven itself. These images have no serious counterpart and are the very essence of the sublime in Romantic art." (Campbell). N. B. With few exceptions (always identified), we only stock books in exceptional condition. All orders are packaged with care and posted promptly. Satisfaction guaranteed. Nº de ref. de la librería BB1454

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2.

MILTON, John (1608-1674); - John MARTIN (1789-1854, illustrator)
Editorial: Septimus Prowett, London (1827)
Usado Imperial quarto Cantidad: 1
Librería
Donald A. Heald Rare Books (ABAA)
(New York, NY, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Septimus Prowett, London, 1827. Imperial quarto. (14 3/8 x 10 1/4 inches). 24 mezzotint engraved plates by John Martin. Contemporary half green morocco over marbled paper covered boards, spines in five compartments divided by double-raised bands, lettered in the second, third and fourth compartments, marbled endpapers, gilt edges Provenance: Thomas Clarke, F.S.A. (armorial bookplate) Imperial quarto Prowett edition of Milton's Paradise Lost, with the larger size masterful illustrations by John Martin: one of the "most significant series of British book illustrations ever to have been produced" (Campbell). This notable edition of Milton's Paradise Lost was published simultaneously in both imperial quarto (as here) and imperial octavo editions. In addition, fifty copies of large-paper, deluxe issues of each edition were available with India proof plates (i.e. 50 copies of large-paper imperial quarto and 50 copies of large-paper imperial octavo, the latter often confused with the present imperial quarto edition as it is similar in sheet size but not image size). Suites of the plates and individual plates, without text, were also issued separately. "This book was one of the great publishing enterprises of the age . The apocalyptic romanticism of his conceptions had many sources: the monumental buildings of London, the engravings of Piranesi, published volumes of eastern views, even incandescent gas, coalpit accidents, and Brunels new Thames Tunnel. The resulting illustrations may be heterogeneous, but they are also unforgettable" (Ray). "Martins illustrations to John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost represent a turning point in his career. The vast majority of Martins most famous works . were based upon either Miltonic or biblical subject matter. The Paradise Lost series are of particular importance both as one of his chief bodies of designs and as the focal point for the beginning of his career as a mezzotint engraver. Begun by early 1824, this series of engravings was the result of a commission from a little known American publisher, named Septimus Prowett . To appreciate the impact which Martin's designs had upon his public, one must realize the extent to which these extraordinary visions represented an entirely new conception of approach to the art of illustration. Not only were they original in the truest sense of the word, designed directly on the plates without the aid of preparatory sketches, they were some of the earliest mezzotints to have been made using soft steel rather than copper, and they were the first illustrations of Milton's epic work to have been made in the mezzotint medium . The greatest significance of Martin's illustrations, however, was in their spectacular visionary content . Martin laid before his public the spectacular settings of the epic tale, the open voids of the Creation, the vast vaulted caverns of Hell vanishing into the utter blackness of Chaos, the daunting scale of the city of Pandemonium, and the sweeping beauty of Heaven itself. These images have no serious counterpart and are the very essence of the sublime in Romantic art. They are without doubt one of the most significant series of British book illustrations ever to have been produced" (Campbell). Lowndes IV, p.1560; Allibone, p. 1300; Ray, The Illustrator and the Book in England , 69; Campbell, John Martin, Visionary Printmaker , pp. 38-41. Nº de ref. de la librería 26789

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3.

MILTON, John
Editorial: London Septimus Prowett (1827)
Usado Tapa dura Cantidad: 1
Librería
Heritage Book Shop, ABAA
(Tarzana, CA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción London Septimus Prowett, 1827. John Milton’s "Paradise Lost" with John Martin’s Illustrations, One of 50 copies MILTON, John. The Paradise Lost of Milton. With Illustrations, Designed and Engraved by John Martin. London: Septimus Prowett, 1827. First (Imperial Quarto) edition. One of only 50 copies with the smaller set of engravings. According to Campbell there were two issues of the Imperial Quarto Edition: "(2) Imperial Quarto Edition, measuring 10 7/8 x 15 1/4 in., with fully lettered prints from the larger set of plates, at £10 16s.(3) Imperial Quarto Edition, measuring 10 7/8 x 15 1/4 in., containing lettered proofs of the smaller set of the engravings: limited to 50 copies, at 12 guineas for the complete publication." Thus even though the images were smaller, this edition was more expensive upon publication. Campbell states "only three copies of the Imperial Quarto edition containing proofs from the smaller set of engravings are now known" (this was in 1992). Two volumes bound in one. Large quarto (14 3/8 x 10 1/2 inches; 366 x 268 mm.). [4], 228; [2], 218 pp. Twenty-four mezzotint plates in the smaller format (image size: 8 x 5 1/2 inches), with tissue guards. Contemporary burgundy pebble-grain morocco. Covers decoratively paneled in gilt, spines paneled and lettered in gilt in compartments, gilt spine bands, gilt board edges, wide gilt-tooled dentelles, marbled endpapers and doublures, all edges gilt. Some light foxing (mainly to the plate margins and prelims). An excellent copy of this scarce edition. "This book was one of the great publishing enterprises of the age. It appeared in eight different formats, four with the large plates (8 by 11 inches) and four with the small (6 by 8 inches). Martin executed the forty-eight mezzotints himself. The apocalyptic romanticism of his conceptions had many sources: the monumental buildings of London, the engravings of Piranesi, published volumes of eastern views, even incandescent gas, coalpit accidents, and Brunel’s new Thames Tunnel. The resulting illustrations may be heterogeneous, but they are also unforgettable" (Ray). "Martin’s illustrations to John Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost represent a turning point in his career. The vast majority of Martin’s most famous works.were based upon either Miltonic or biblical subject matter—the Paradise Lost series are of particular importance both as one of his chief bodies of designs and as the focal point for the beginning of his career as a mezzotint engraver. Begun by early 1824, this series of engravings was the result of a commission from a little known American publisher, names Septimus Prowett. Prowett, who was based in London, approached Martin to produce 24 mezzotint illustrations.to accompany an issue of Milton’s text which was to be produced in twelve parts.To appreciate the impact which Martin’s designs had upon his public, one must realize the extent to which these extraordinary visions represented an entirely new conception of approach to the art of illustration. Not only were they ‘original’ in the truest sense of the word—designed directly on the plates without the aid of preparatory sketches, they were some of the earliest mezzotints to have been made using soft steel rather than copper, and they were the first illustrations of Milton’s epic work to have been made in the mezzotint medium.The greatest significance of Martin’s illustrations, however, was in their spectacular visionary content.Martin laid before his public the spectacular settings of the epic tale—the open voids of the Creation, the vast vaulted caverns of Hell vanishing into the utter blackness of Chaos, the daunting scale of the city of Pandemonium, and the sweeping beauty f Heaven itself. These images have no serious counterpart and are the very essence of the sublime in Romantic art. They are without doubt one of the most significant series of British book illustrations ever to have been produced" (Campbell, John Martin, Visionary Printmaker, pp. 38-41). Ray, The Illustrator and t. Nº de ref. de la librería 65255

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