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The Masculine Mysteries and the Quest for the Whiteness: A Synchronicity Workbook

Bernard Bovasso

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ISBN 10: 1425935605 / ISBN 13: 9781425935603
Editorial: Authorhouse
Nuevos Condición: New Encuadernación de tapa blanda
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Paperback. 340 pages. Dimensions: 9.0in. x 6.0in. x 0.8in.THE MASCULINE QUEST FOR THE WHITENESS The telestic nature of the Masculine Mysteries served as the medium for The Whiteness which, in its generality, points directly to a representation of Death and the masculine drive to achieve union of the Self at the last stop in life: the divine after-life unity otherwise known as God or Allah, or, as Jung psychologically paraphrased it, the Unus Mundus . For Freud this unity was called Eros, as simply life drive, in his distinction between Eros and Thanatos. For Jung it included the Unus Mundus as final and everlasting Oneness. For Goethe it was perhaps a return to the All and which, of course, is no-place at all, i. e. , u-topos. For Herman Melville it was expressed through his Capt. Ahab who was joined in final unity with the great white whale. Today we may recognize as much in the suicidal martyr. In all cases the quest for The Whiteness expressed a haste to prematurely achieve final perfection. Such drives, for the most part were, at least typically, fit for men except for its feminine demeanor exemplified by the animus of the feminine psychology, a womans inner and largely unconscious maleness. In all cases, the color of all color and exclusively male quest for Final Perfection I must treat with regard to its form as only inferentially metaphysical and theological. But the content in fact addressed what Jung referred to as the imago dei: God as the psychological rather than the metaphysical Self. From this less than theological standpoint the Deity, as Melville noted in his Moby Dick, was concealed beneath the veil of Whiteness. . The above polarities I have generalized as The Whiteness, the heroic masculine thanatic trieb (death instinct) and The Blackness as Eros and the creative feminine proclivity for life and endopsychic perception. In the first part of this work, however, I start out with a more naive and narrative approach. I then move on to more complex metapsychological speculations and not This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. N° de ref. de la librería 9781425935603

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Detalles bibliográficos

Título: The Masculine Mysteries and the Quest for ...

Editorial: Authorhouse

Encuadernación: Paperback

Condición del libro:New

Tipo de libro: Paperback

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THE MASCULINE QUEST FOR THE WHITENESS The telestic nature of the Masculine Mysteries served as the medium for The Whiteness which, in its generality, points directly to a representation of Death and the masculine drive to achieve union of the Self at the last stop in life: the divine after-life unity otherwise known as God or Allah, or, as Jung psychologically paraphrased it, the Unus Mundus . For Freud this unity was called Eros, as simply "life drive," in his distinction between Eros and Thanatos. For Jung it included the Unus Mundus as final and everlasting Oneness. For Goethe it was perhaps a return to the All and which, of course, is no-place at all, i.e., u-topos. For Herman Melville it was expressed through his Capt. Ahab who was joined in final unity with the great white whale. Today we may recognize as much in the suicidal martyr. In all cases the quest for The Whiteness expressed a haste to prematurely achieve final perfection. Such drives, for the most part were, at least typically, fit for men except for its feminine demeanor exemplified by the animus of the feminine psychology, a woman's inner and largely unconscious "maleness." In all cases, the color of all color and exclusively male quest for Final Perfection I must treat with regard to its form as only inferentially metaphysical and theological. But the content in fact addressed what Jung referred to as the imago dei: God as the psychological rather than the metaphysical Self. From this less than theological standpoint the Deity, as Melville noted in his Moby Dick, was concealed beneath the veil of Whiteness. . The above polarities I have generalized as The Whiteness, the heroic masculine thanatic trieb (death instinct) and The Blackness as Eros and the creative feminine proclivity for "life" and endopsychic perception. In the first part of this work, however, I start out with a more naive and narrative approach. I then move on to more complex metapsychological speculations and not

About the Author:

Bernard X. Bovasso is essentially a painter and a poet and a onetime art and drama reviewer for the Woodstock Times of Woodstock, N.Y. His interest in the work of C.G. Jung of Zurich goes back to his student days at the Cooper Union Art School (1948-'51). Prior to that he served with the U.S. Maritime Training Service and then on active duty in the U.S. Merchant Marine at the close of World War II (1945 to 1949). In September of 1946 he was signed aboard the USAT E.B. Alexander when it exploded in the North Sea and foundered. After release from service he he often found it necessary to take a sea voyage during college summer recess to support himself at school. During the summer of '49 he nearly did not make it back for the Fall Semester when he was assigned to an LST loaded with giant snow plows and headed for Thule, Greenland for the construction of the early warning base just 500 miles south of the North Pole. "Operation Blue Jay," as the mission was called, was composed of U.S. Army supply ships in the company of a U.S. Navy task force that included an aircraft carrier. The trip cured him of ever going to sea again. But he was also cured of Academia when, after Cooper Union, he turned down a fellowship to the Yale University Art School. He was perhaps much influenced by Herman Melville's claim: "The whaleship was my Harvard and Yale." Soon after he was in analysis with Frieda Stern of NY City, a proteg¿ of Toni Wolff of Zurich. After that his interest in the Analytical Psychology of C.G. Jung became intensive and eventually led to a study of philosophy. At the New School for Social Research in NYC, he studied pre-Socratic Philosophy with Prof. Hans Jonas and Ernest Cassirer's Philosophy of Symbolic Forms with Prof. Eugen Gadol (1963). During 1972 he retired from NYC and moved to a small upstate village along the Hudson River where he reconditioned an old factory building for use as a studio and residence. His children include Christopher, a lead guitarist with h

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