Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe including "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-Vincent"

Anonymous

Editorial: Ch.- J. Panckoucke, 1773
Usado / Hardcover / Cantidad: 0
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On offer here is an attractive volume in 18th century full calf, bound in the French style, (flat spine with floral tools in gilt, red label lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, edges decoratively stained red). The volume in which these interesting numbers of the now-scarce 'Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe' is in a handsome contemporary binding which shows only minor rubbing -- mostly along the hinges, apart from some moderate fraying and loss at the corners and erosion of the top cap of the spine, exposing the headband. The original swirl-marbled endpapers are intact and the inner hinges are tight and secure; the sewing is sound and tight throughout. There are scattered brown marks and paper flaws, reflecting the mediocre quality of the paper selected for this journal, which was hardly expected to last for 240 years. This volume contains issues 10-18 of the interesting periodical "Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe," covering events of April-June of 1773. This journal was published every 10 days for the active Parisian publisher and bookseller Charles-Joseph Panckoucke. One of the "différentes Cours de L'Europe" in which events were covered extensively was London, with pages of details of goings on in England and its colonies offered in each issue. There is an unusually detailed account, with full text (in French) of a significant treaty signed by a representative of King George III: "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-VIncent." This appears on pp. 45-48 of Numero 12 -- issued 30 Avril, 1773. The treaty is presented as having been agreed to on the 17th "de ces mois," and so it is very much in the category of breaking news. This treaty is now fairly (but undeservedly) obscure, but the situation it attempted to settle grew out of one famous treaty, from ten years before and it proved to be a fascinating precursor to another more famous treaty, signed ten years later. In one of the lesser re-assignments of the territories of the world effected by the 1763 Treaty of Paris at the conclusion of the Seven Years' War -- Britain was awarded the right to rule over the Caribbean island of Saint Vincent. The island's history, of course, is much older; native American Arawak and Carib tribes settled over several centuries on a number of islands in the Lesser Antilles including St.Vincent. The Arawaks arrived around 100AD, and the Caribs about a thousand years later. The Caribs, more organized and aggressive, subdued and absorbed the culture of the Arawaks. Shortly after the first British claim on Saint Vincent in 1627, two Dutch ships carrying captured Nigerians destined for slavery were shipwrecked in 1635 off the coast of St. Vincent. Some of the Africans were able to swim ashore and find shelter in the Carib villages. This population of Africans and their descendants was augmented over the years, including in 1675 when a ship carrying British settlers and their slaves was shipwrecked between St. Vincent and Bequia. Only the slaves survived the shipwreck and they also came to live and mix with the native mixed Carib-Arawak population. A certain number of escaped slaves from nearby Barbados, Grenada and St. Lucia also added to the African-Carib population. After some friction, and even wars, eventually the native Caribs and the newer African arrivals merged and blended their cultures. British settlers distinguished them as "Black Caribs" and "Red (or yellow) Caribs. The "Black" people so-designated by outsiders preferred to call themselves Garifuna. Throughout some of this period, there were French settlers who arrived with the intention of making their living as planters. They seemed to get along with the native population with less friction, but the British land owners seemed united in their desire to form large plantations and to run the Caribs off the most desireable land. They tried to bu. N° de ref. de la librería

Detalles bibliográficos

Título: Journal Historique Et Politique Des ...
Editorial: Ch.- J. Panckoucke
Año de publicación: 1773
Encuadernación: Hardcover
Condición del libro: Very Good
Edición: First Edition.

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Anonymous
Editorial: Ch.- J. Panckoucke, Genève [but probably Paris] (1773)
Usado Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Antiquarian Bookshop
(Washington, DC, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
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Descripción Ch.- J. Panckoucke, Genève [but probably Paris], 1773. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: Very Good. First Edition. On offer here is an attractive volume in 18th century full calf, bound in the French style, (flat spine with floral tools in gilt, red label lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, edges decoratively stained red). The volume in which these interesting numbers of the now-scarce 'Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe' is in a handsome contemporary binding which shows only minor rubbing -- mostly along the hinges, apart from some moderate fraying and loss at the corners and erosion of the top cap of the spine, exposing the headband. The original swirl-marbled endpapers are intact and the inner hinges are tight and secure; the sewing is sound and tight throughout. There are scattered brown marks and paper flaws, reflecting the mediocre quality of the paper selected for this journal, which was hardly expected to last for 240 years. This volume contains issues 10-18 of the interesting periodical "Journal Historique Et Politique Des Principaux Événements Des Différentes Cours de L'Europe," covering events of April-June of 1773. This journal was published every 10 days for the active Parisian publisher and bookseller Charles-Joseph Panckoucke. One of the "différentes Cours de L'Europe" in which events were covered extensively was London, with pages of details of goings on in England and its colonies offered in each issue. There is an unusually detailed account, with full text (in French) of a significant treaty signed by a representative of King George III: "Traite de paix entre l'Angleterre & les Caraïbes de l'isle Saint-VIncent." This appears on pp. 45-48 of Numero 12 -- issued 30 Avril, 1773. The treaty is presented as having been agreed to on the 17th "de ces mois," and so it is very much in the category of breaking news. This treaty is now fairly (but undeservedly) obscure, but the situation it attempted to settle grew out of one famous treaty, from ten years before and it proved to be a fascinating precursor to another more famous treaty, signed ten years later. In one of the lesser re-assignments of the territories of the world effected by the 1763 Treaty of Paris at the conclusion of the Seven Years' War -- Britain was awarded the right to rule over the Caribbean island of Saint Vincent. The island's history, of course, is much older; native American Arawak and Carib tribes settled over several centuries on a number of islands in the Lesser Antilles including St.Vincent. The Arawaks arrived around 100AD, and the Caribs about a thousand years later. The Caribs, more organized and aggressive, subdued and absorbed the culture of the Arawaks. Shortly after the first British claim on Saint Vincent in 1627, two Dutch ships carrying captured Nigerians destined for slavery were shipwrecked in 1635 off the coast of St. Vincent. Some of the Africans were able to swim ashore and find shelter in the Carib villages. This population of Africans and their descendants was augmented over the years, including in 1675 when a ship carrying British settlers and their slaves was shipwrecked between St. Vincent and Bequia. Only the slaves survived the shipwreck and they also came to live and mix with the native mixed Carib-Arawak population. A certain number of escaped slaves from nearby Barbados, Grenada and St. Lucia also added to the African-Carib population. After some friction, and even wars, eventually the native Caribs and the newer African arrivals merged and blended their cultures. British settlers distinguished them as "Black Caribs" and "Red (or yellow) Caribs. The "Black" people so-designated by outsiders preferred to call themselves Garifuna. Throughout some of this period, there were French settlers who arrived with the intention of making their living as planters. They seemed to get along with the native population with less friction, but the British land owners seemed united in their desire to form large plantations and to run the Caribs off the most desireable land. They tried to bu. Nº de ref. de la librería 41470

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