Imagen del editor

The Horrible Gift of Freedom: Atlantic Slavery and the Representation of Emancipation

Wood, Marcus

2 valoraciones por Goodreads
ISBN 10: 0820334278 / ISBN 13: 9780820334271
Editorial: Univ of Georgia Pr, 2010
Nuevos Condición: Brand New Encuadernación de tapa blanda
Librería: Revaluation Books (Exeter, Reino Unido)

Librería en AbeBooks desde: 6 de enero de 2003

Cantidad disponible: 2

Comprar nuevo
Precio: EUR 48,35 Convertir moneda
Gastos de envío: EUR 6,86 De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío
Añadir al carrito

Descripción

516 pages. 9.00x6.00x1.00 inches. In Stock. N° de ref. de la librería x-0820334278

Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Detalles bibliográficos

Título: The Horrible Gift of Freedom: Atlantic ...

Editorial: Univ of Georgia Pr

Año de publicación: 2010

Encuadernación: Paperback

Condición del libro:Brand New

Acerca de

Sinopsis:

Book by Wood Marcus

Críticas:

"Marcus Wood is the most distinctive voice in English talking about slavery. In The Horrible Gift of Freedom, he combines intellectual mastery of diverse (and interdisciplinary) works with a remarkable assertiveness of style. The result is a book you won't be able to ignore." -- James Walvin "author of The Trader, The Owner, The Slave: Parallel Lives in the Age of Slavery" "Marcus Wood, the preeminent scholar of the iconography of slavery, has written a brilliant successor to his pathbreaking book "Blind Memory". "The Horrible Gift of Freedom" is a necessary, vital book. Indeed, it should be required reading for anyone interested in the meanings and legacies of slavery and freedom. The prose is elegant, the analyses always penetrating and often provocative; and the result is that Wood has transformed common understandings of emancipation, highlighting the limits of freedom and offering a sober meditation on its legacy in the twenty-first century."--John Stauffer, author of "Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln" "With "The Horrible Gift of Freedom", Marcus Wood deploys his characteristic rigor, creativity, and verve in the service of a near complete dismantling of abolitionist self-satisfaction. The cultural artifacts produced to celebrate abolition, both then and now, never have received more searching inquiry."--Christopher L. Brown, author of "Moral Capital: Foundations of British Abolitionism" A haunting tour de force, Marcus Wood's recent book The Horrible Gift of Freedom offers a provocative and challenging examination of dominant sites and sights of memory and representation vis-A-vis Atlantic slavery. --Journal of American Studies Wood's analysis of popular 19th-century iconography is thorough, sharp, and disillusioning . . . Richly illustrated and a pleasure to read. --Choice In this highly original study, Wood offers no easy answers; his scrutiny of popular and artistic imagery shows us clearly how abolition, slavery, and collective memory collide. As long as we, former slave-trading cultures, celebrate abolition in order to forget slavery, the past will continue to haunt us. --Chronicle of Higher Education Deftly merges socially engaged scholarship with sardonic cultural criticism . . . The book succeeds powerfully, where others have not, in revealing and explaining the enduring influence of nineteenth-century emancipation iconography in British and American popular culture. --Journal of American History Marcus Wood is the most distinctive voice talking about slavery in English. In The Horrible Gift of Freedom, he combines intellectual mastery of diverse (and interdisciplinary) works with a remarkable assertiveness of style. The result is a book you won't be able to ignore. --James Walvin "author of The Trader, the Owner, the Slave: Parallel Lives in the Age of Slavery " With The Horrible Gift of Freedom, Marcus Wood deploys his characteristic rigor, creativity, and verve in the service of a near complete dismantling of abolitionist self-satisfaction. The cultural artifacts produced to celebrate abolition, both then and now, never have received more searching inquiry. --Christopher L. Brown "author of Moral Capital: Foundations of British Abolitionism " Wood has meticulously deconstructed the devastating myth that freedom was a gift generously conferred to Africans. His book is a witty, gripping, sophisticated analysis of the racism and self-congratulation that centuries ago built narrative and pictorial falsehoods of staggering proportions; a deception, as he aptly demonstrates, still going on in the twenty-first century. --Sylviane A. Diouf "author of Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America " Marcus Wood, the preeminent scholar of the iconography of slavery, has written a brilliant successor to his pathbreaking book Blind Memory. The Horrible Gift of Freedom is a necessary, vital book. Indeed, it should be required reading for anyone interested in the meanings and legacies of slavery and freedom. The prose is elegant, the analyses always penetrating and often provocative; and the result is that Wood has transformed common understandings of emancipation, highlighting the limits of freedom and offering a sober meditation on its legacy in the twenty-first century. --John Stauffer "author of Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln " A haunting tour de force, Marcus Wood's recent book "The Horrible Gift of Freedom" offers a provocative and challenging examination of dominant sites and sights of memory and representation vis-A-vis Atlantic slavery.--"Journal of American Studies" Wood's analysis of popular 19th-century iconography is thorough, sharp, and disillusioning . . . Richly illustrated and a pleasure to read.--"Choice" In this highly original study, Wood offers no easy answers; his scrutiny of popular and artistic imagery shows us clearly how abolition, slavery, and collective memory collide. As long as we, former slave-trading cultures, celebrate abolition in order to forget slavery, the past will continue to haunt us.--"Chronicle of Higher Education" Deftly merges socially engaged scholarship with sardonic cultural criticism . . . The book succeeds powerfully, where others have not, in revealing and explaining the enduring influence of nineteenth-century emancipation iconography in British and American popular culture.--"Journal of American History" Marcus Wood is the most distinctive voice talking about slavery in English. In "The Horrible Gift of Freedom," he combines intellectual mastery of diverse (and interdisciplinary) works with a remarkable assertiveness of style. The result is a book you won't be able to ignore.--James Walvin "author of "The Trader, the Owner, the Slave: Parallel Lives in the Age of Slavery" " With "The Horrible Gift of Freedom," Marcus Wood deploys his characteristic rigor, creativity, and verve in the service of a near complete dismantling of abolitionist self-satisfaction. The cultural artifacts produced to celebrate abolition, both then and now, never have received more searching inquiry.--Christopher L. Brown "author of "Moral Capital: Foundations of British Abolitionism" " Wood has meticulously deconstructed the devastating myth that freedom was a gift generously conferred to Africans. His book is a witty, gripping, sophisticated analysis of the racism and self-congratulation that centuries ago built narrative and pictorial falsehoods of staggering proportions; a deception, as he aptly demonstrates, still going on in the twenty-first century.--Sylviane A. Diouf "author of "Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America" " Marcus Wood, the preeminent scholar of the iconography of slavery, has written a brilliant successor to his pathbreaking book "Blind Memory." "The Horrible Gift of Freedom" is a necessary, vital book. Indeed, it should be required reading for anyone interested in the meanings and legacies of slavery and freedom. The prose is elegant, the analyses always penetrating and often provocative; and the result is that Wood has transformed common understandings of emancipation, highlighting the limits of freedom and offering a sober meditation on its legacy in the twenty-first century.--John Stauffer "author of "Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln" " "In this highly original study, Wood offers no easy answers; his scrutiny of popular and artistic imagery shows us clearly how abolition, slavery, and collective memory collide. As long as we, former slave-trading cultures, celebrate abolition in order to forget slavery, the past will continue to haunt us."--"The Chronicle of Higher Education" "A haunting tour de force, Marcus Wood's recent book "The Horrible Gift of Freedom" offers a provocative and challenging examination of dominant sites and sights of memory and representation vis-a-vis Atlantic slavery." -"Journal of American Studies" "Deftly merges socially engaged scholarship with sardonic cultural criticism . . . The book succeeds powerfully, where others have not, in revealing and explaining the enduring influence of nineteenth-century emancipation iconography in British and American popular culture" -"Journal of American History" "Marcus Wood is the most distinctive voice talking about slavery in English. In "The Horrible Gift of Freedom", he combines intellectual mastery of diverse (and interdisciplinary) works with a remarkable assertiveness of style. The result is a book you won't be able to ignore."--James Walvin, author of "The Trader, the Owner, the Slave: Parallel Lives in the Age of Slavery" "Wood's analysis of popular 19th-century iconography is thorough, sharp, and disillusioning . . . Richly illustrated and a pleasure to read."--"Choice" "Wood has meticulously deconstructed the devastating myth that freedom was a gift generously conferred to Africans. His book is a witty, gripping, sophisticated analysis of the racism and self-congratulation that centuries ago built narrative and pictorial falsehoods of staggering proportions; a deception, as he aptly demonstrates, still going on in the twenty-first century."--Sylviane A. Diouf, author of "Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America"

"Sobre este título" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

Descripción de la librería

Ver la página web de la librería

Condiciones de venta:

Legal entity name: Edward Bowditch Ltd
Legal entity form: Limited company
Business correspondence address: Exstowe, Exton, Exeter, EX3 0PP
Company registration number: 04916632
VAT registration: GB834241546
Authorised representative: Mr. E. Bowditch

Condiciones de envío:

Orders usually dispatched within two working days.

Todos los libros de esta librería

Métodos de pago
aceptados por la librería

Visa Mastercard American Express Carte Bleue