Daily Alta California Volume 22, Number 7551, 23 November 1870

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Editorial: Daily Alta California, 1870
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Out of the ashes of two previous publications, the 'California Star' and 'Californian,' a man named Robert B. Semple made a newspaper, soon called the 'Daily Alta California.' The previous publications had both been required to cease publication since all the members of the staff of each publication had departed the city for the gold fields by June of 1848. On January 22, 1849 the 'Alta California' began daily publication, becoming the first daily newspaper in California. Within six months, the new daily was being printed on the first steam press in the American West. It was continued until June of 1891 -- so that this issue from November 23, 1870 is about half way through the run. By the time our issue appeared, the newspaper had secured a permanent place in history for employing one particular young correspondent. When Mark Twain departed California for New York at the end of 1866, he finagled a position as a travelling "Special" correspondent for the 'Daily Alta California.' In early 1867 he got the 'Alta' to pay a significant sum -- $1250 -- to cover his fare on the steamer 'Quaker City' for its upcoming tour of Europe and the Middle East. In return for this investment, the newspaper got 51 dispatches by letters from Mark Twain, which they published between August of 1867and January of 1868. For his part, Mark Twain got a rough draft for his "Innocents Abroad." Readers of the newspaper's dispatches from Twain got at least one thrill left out of the book: the great writer's reportage on nude bathers near Odessa. Leaving this hilarious and educational piece out of the book may possibly be blamed or credited to Bret Harte. Three days before our newspaper appeared, Twain wrote to Charles Henry Webb (the publisher of 'The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.') -- "Harte read all the manuscript of the 'Innocents' & told me what passages, paragraphs & chapters to leave out - & I followed orders strictly". Mark Twain did stay long enough in San Francisco to experience one of the local specialties -- an earthquake. He recounts his observations of October 8, 1865 in 'Roughing It' -- "I was coming down Third Street. The only objects in motion anywhere in sight in that thickly built and populous quarter were a man in a buggy behind me, and a streetcar wending slowly up the cross street. Otherwise, all was solitude and a Sabbath stillness. . a third and still severer shock came, and as I reeled about on the pavement trying to keep my footing, I saw a sight! The entire front of a tall four-story brick building on Third Street sprung outward like a door and fell sprawling across the street, raising a great dust-like volume of smoke!And here came the buggy--overboard went the man, and in less time than I can tell it the vehicle was distributed in small fragments along three hundred yards of street. . The streetcar had stopped, the horses were rearing and plunging, the passengers were pouring out at both ends, and one fat man had crashed halfway through a glass window on one side of the car, got wedged fast, and was squirming and screaming like an impaled madman. Every door, of every house, as far as the eye could reach, was vomiting a stream of human beings; and almost before one could execute a wink and begin another, there was a massed multitude of people stretching in endless procession down every street my position commanded. Never was a solemn solitude turned into teeming life quicker." Another quake struck the city in 1869, so it was with the growing knowledge that earthquakes might become a San Francisco trait, that a central column in this issue at the top of the front page was devoted to an account: "Earthquake-proof Buildings. Views of Colonel B. S. Alexander, U. S. A." Col. Alexander was Barton Stone Alexander [1819-1878] - who graduated 7th (of 56) in the West Point class of 1842, and then served in the Mexican-American War, building fortifications to protect American supply lines in the advance on Mexico City. After t. N° de ref. de la librería

Detalles bibliográficos

Título: Daily Alta California Volume 22, Number 7551...
Editorial: Daily Alta California
Año de publicación: 1870
Encuadernación: Paperback
Condición del libro: Very Good-

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Editorial: Daily Alta California, San Francisco (1870)
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Descripción Daily Alta California, San Francisco, 1870. Paperback. Estado de conservación: Very Good-. Out of the ashes of two previous publications, the 'California Star' and 'Californian,' a man named Robert B. Semple made a newspaper, soon called the 'Daily Alta California.' The previous publications had both been required to cease publication since all the members of the staff of each publication had departed the city for the gold fields by June of 1848. On January 22, 1849 the 'Alta California' began daily publication, becoming the first daily newspaper in California. Within six months, the new daily was being printed on the first steam press in the American West. It was continued until June of 1891 -- so that this issue from November 23, 1870 is about half way through the run. By the time our issue appeared, the newspaper had secured a permanent place in history for employing one particular young correspondent. When Mark Twain departed California for New York at the end of 1866, he finagled a position as a travelling "Special" correspondent for the 'Daily Alta California.' In early 1867 he got the 'Alta' to pay a significant sum -- $1250 -- to cover his fare on the steamer 'Quaker City' for its upcoming tour of Europe and the Middle East. In return for this investment, the newspaper got 51 dispatches by letters from Mark Twain, which they published between August of 1867and January of 1868. For his part, Mark Twain got a rough draft for his "Innocents Abroad." Readers of the newspaper's dispatches from Twain got at least one thrill left out of the book: the great writer's reportage on nude bathers near Odessa. Leaving this hilarious and educational piece out of the book may possibly be blamed or credited to Bret Harte. Three days before our newspaper appeared, Twain wrote to Charles Henry Webb (the publisher of 'The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.') -- "Harte read all the manuscript of the 'Innocents' & told me what passages, paragraphs & chapters to leave out - & I followed orders strictly". Mark Twain did stay long enough in San Francisco to experience one of the local specialties -- an earthquake. He recounts his observations of October 8, 1865 in 'Roughing It' -- "I was coming down Third Street. The only objects in motion anywhere in sight in that thickly built and populous quarter were a man in a buggy behind me, and a streetcar wending slowly up the cross street. Otherwise, all was solitude and a Sabbath stillness. . a third and still severer shock came, and as I reeled about on the pavement trying to keep my footing, I saw a sight! The entire front of a tall four-story brick building on Third Street sprung outward like a door and fell sprawling across the street, raising a great dust-like volume of smoke!And here came the buggy--overboard went the man, and in less time than I can tell it the vehicle was distributed in small fragments along three hundred yards of street. . The streetcar had stopped, the horses were rearing and plunging, the passengers were pouring out at both ends, and one fat man had crashed halfway through a glass window on one side of the car, got wedged fast, and was squirming and screaming like an impaled madman. Every door, of every house, as far as the eye could reach, was vomiting a stream of human beings; and almost before one could execute a wink and begin another, there was a massed multitude of people stretching in endless procession down every street my position commanded. Never was a solemn solitude turned into teeming life quicker." Another quake struck the city in 1869, so it was with the growing knowledge that earthquakes might become a San Francisco trait, that a central column in this issue at the top of the front page was devoted to an account: "Earthquake-proof Buildings. Views of Colonel B. S. Alexander, U. S. A." Col. Alexander was Barton Stone Alexander [1819-1878] - who graduated 7th (of 56) in the West Point class of 1842, and then served in the Mexican-American War, building fortifications to protect American supply lines in the advance on Mexico City. After t. Nº de ref. de la librería 40787

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