The Cottage of David Burnes and Its Dining-Room Mantel A Sketch, read to the Columbia Historical Society in Washington on February 25, 1919

Hood, James Franklin

Editorial: (Privately Printed for the Author), 1919
Usado / Softcover / Cantidad: 0
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17 & [1] pages; Publisher's grey mottled wrappers, front cover with text printed in black within a framing pair of grey rules. Frontispiece etching by W. B. Wallace, with tissue guard on which an explanatory text is printed in red. With a full page photograph reproduced in gravure, also with tissue guard, and one text figure reproducing the Burnes Mantel. Clean and tight in the original wrappers and sewing. Minor split along the top of the spine, and some scrappy tears (minor loss along the bottom) to the Yapp (overhanging) edges of the wrappers. This text was presented by the author as a paper read to the Columbia Historical Society in Washington on February 25, 1919. The text was eventually published in the society's annual volume for 1920 [Records of the Columbia Historical Society, Washington, D.C. volume 23 (1920): pp. 1-9]. But this separate edition as a pamphlet is explained by a short note on the leaf following the title page: "The writer has printed a few copies of this sketch for presentation to friends, front-page by a practically unknown etching from a private plate made by William H. Wallace, of Bedford Park, New York, about 1896, from views taken before that date." [This etching does not appear in the subsequent 1920 text contained in volume 23 of the Society's 'Records']. "An effective picture of the cottage in its final stage, and possibly its last authentic portrait, from an unpublished photograph by T. A. Mullet, of Washington, made in 1894, is shown with his permission." [This photograph is reproduced in gravure, with a similar tissue guard with text printed in red. As with the etching, Mullet's photograph does not appear in the 1920 'Records' version of Hood's text]. Inscribed in ink on the front free endpaper: "To my long-time friend / Mr. W. B. Hibbs / with the compliments of / The Author." [In 1889, William B. Hibbs purchased a seat on the New York Stock Exchange and founded the investment firm that later became Folger Nolan Fleming Douglas Incorporated. He became President of the Washington Stock Exchange and one of the wealthiest men in Washington. Hibbs commissioned a building for his brokerage firm at 725 15th Street NW. Designed by Bruce, Price & de Sibour, architects, the lower portion of the building was set aside for W. B. Hibbs & Co. and contained a banking room in the front and a stock trading room in the rear section. The architects set aside the upper floors for their Washington headquarters. The building was designed in the French renaissance style of the day and built of white marble upon a steel frame. As such, the building was considered fireproof. Upon completion, the total cost of the building was estimated to exceed $250,000. Luckily, it stands today, now known as the Folger building]. The subject of this text is David Burnes, who owned a farm occupying the center of the tract along the Potomac which was selected by the U. S. Congress in 1790 as the site of the new Capital city -- Washington. The house, or cottage, which Burnes built was the oldest dwelling in Washington, and stood near the present location of the Pan-American building. Burnes' farm included what is now the White House and its grounds, all of the National Mall, the Smithsonian museum buildings, and much more. George Washington considered "Davy" Burnes the most obstinate man he ever met. Burnes died May 9, 1799. His daughter Marcia married a wealthy congressman from New York, John Peter VanNess, in 1802. The VanNess's built a spendid mansion nearby on the grounds of her birthplace, but she maintained her father's cottage until her death in 1832. After her husband's death in 1846, the cottage went to ruin. After having been damaged by a serious storm, it was pulled down in May, 1894. The author visited the dwelling in 1893. As President of the Columbia Athletic Club, whose new grounds included the site, Hood was allowed to remove the old mantelpiece from the Burnes cottage, which he had cleaned of several coats of paint. N° de ref. de la librería

Detalles bibliográficos

Título: The Cottage of David Burnes and Its ...
Editorial: (Privately Printed for the Author)
Año de publicación: 1919
Encuadernación: Softcover
Condición del libro: Very Good
Edición: First Edition; First Printing.

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Hood, James Franklin
Editorial: (Privately Printed for the Author), Washington, DC (1919)
Usado Softcover Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Antiquarian Bookshop
(Washington, DC, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
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Descripción (Privately Printed for the Author), Washington, DC, 1919. Softcover. Estado de conservación: Very Good. First Edition; First Printing. 17 & [1] pages; Publisher's grey mottled wrappers, front cover with text printed in black within a framing pair of grey rules. Frontispiece etching by W. B. Wallace, with tissue guard on which an explanatory text is printed in red. With a full page photograph reproduced in gravure, also with tissue guard, and one text figure reproducing the Burnes Mantel. Clean and tight in the original wrappers and sewing. Minor split along the top of the spine, and some scrappy tears (minor loss along the bottom) to the Yapp (overhanging) edges of the wrappers. This text was presented by the author as a paper read to the Columbia Historical Society in Washington on February 25, 1919. The text was eventually published in the society's annual volume for 1920 [Records of the Columbia Historical Society, Washington, D.C. volume 23 (1920): pp. 1-9]. But this separate edition as a pamphlet is explained by a short note on the leaf following the title page: "The writer has printed a few copies of this sketch for presentation to friends, front-page by a practically unknown etching from a private plate made by William H. Wallace, of Bedford Park, New York, about 1896, from views taken before that date." [This etching does not appear in the subsequent 1920 text contained in volume 23 of the Society's 'Records']. "An effective picture of the cottage in its final stage, and possibly its last authentic portrait, from an unpublished photograph by T. A. Mullet, of Washington, made in 1894, is shown with his permission." [This photograph is reproduced in gravure, with a similar tissue guard with text printed in red. As with the etching, Mullet's photograph does not appear in the 1920 'Records' version of Hood's text]. Inscribed in ink on the front free endpaper: "To my long-time friend / Mr. W. B. Hibbs / with the compliments of / The Author." [In 1889, William B. Hibbs purchased a seat on the New York Stock Exchange and founded the investment firm that later became Folger Nolan Fleming Douglas Incorporated. He became President of the Washington Stock Exchange and one of the wealthiest men in Washington. Hibbs commissioned a building for his brokerage firm at 725 15th Street NW. Designed by Bruce, Price & de Sibour, architects, the lower portion of the building was set aside for W. B. Hibbs & Co. and contained a banking room in the front and a stock trading room in the rear section. The architects set aside the upper floors for their Washington headquarters. The building was designed in the French renaissance style of the day and built of white marble upon a steel frame. As such, the building was considered fireproof. Upon completion, the total cost of the building was estimated to exceed $250,000. Luckily, it stands today, now known as the Folger building]. The subject of this text is David Burnes, who owned a farm occupying the center of the tract along the Potomac which was selected by the U. S. Congress in 1790 as the site of the new Capital city -- Washington. The house, or cottage, which Burnes built was the oldest dwelling in Washington, and stood near the present location of the Pan-American building. Burnes' farm included what is now the White House and its grounds, all of the National Mall, the Smithsonian museum buildings, and much more. George Washington considered "Davy" Burnes the most obstinate man he ever met. Burnes died May 9, 1799. His daughter Marcia married a wealthy congressman from New York, John Peter VanNess, in 1802. The VanNess's built a spendid mansion nearby on the grounds of her birthplace, but she maintained her father's cottage until her death in 1832. After her husband's death in 1846, the cottage went to ruin. After having been damaged by a serious storm, it was pulled down in May, 1894. The author visited the dwelling in 1893. As President of the Columbia Athletic Club, whose new grounds included the site, Hood was allowed to remove the old mantelpiece from the Burnes cottage, which he had cleaned of several coats of paint. Nº de ref. de la librería 41630

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