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Black and Brown Planets: The Politics of Race in Science Fiction

Lavender, Isiah (Editor)

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ISBN 10: 1628461233 / ISBN 13: 9781628461237
Editorial: Univ Pr of Mississippi, 2014
Nuevos Condición: Brand New Encuadernación de tapa dura
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256 pages. 9.00x6.25x1.00 inches. In Stock. N° de ref. de la librería z-1628461233

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Título: Black and Brown Planets: The Politics of ...

Editorial: Univ Pr of Mississippi

Año de publicación: 2014

Encuadernación: Hardcover

Condición del libro:Brand New

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�From Isiah Lavender�s powerful introduction in which he recounts his first memories of racial otherness and of being the target of racism to Robin Anne Reid�s pioneering coda in which she brings to SF fan studies the analytical tools of computational linguistics in the service of constructing a social ontology of race, with a dozen fine essays in between, Black and Brown Planets significantly expands and intensifies our understanding of the ways in which �the literature of the future� has sometimes earnestly grappled with, sometimes simply erased, and sometimes blithely ignored issues of race. The essays in this collection extend the color line studied in Lavender�s Race in American Science Fiction to global color lines, including those involving indigenous peoples in America, Brazil, Mexico, and Thailand, always with an eye toward ways in which race and ethnicity figure in the construction of SF societies.��Brooks Landon, Herman J. and Eileen S. Schmidt Professor at the University of Iowa �Isiah Lavender has assembled some of the field�s top scholars and most important emerging voices in an essential volume that shows the range and depth of science fiction�s engagement with questions of race and racism. This groundbreaking collection combines work on well-known writers of colour such as Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler with analysis of work by indigenous and Latino writers such as Leslie Marmon Silko and Ernest Hogan. Reading this collection leaves no doubt that racial difference structures the science fictional imagination, and Lavender�s volume demonstrates both the dangers of complicity with imperialist ideology to which SF can succumb and the power of its tools in the hands of writers of colour to resist and revise racist stereotypes and articulate a more promising future. Black and Brown Planets promises to be an indispensable reference for understanding the critical ethnic imaginaries of twenty-first century science fiction.��Sherryl Vint, professor of science fiction media studies, co-director of the Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies Program, University of California, Riverside �Since Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, science fiction has been troubled by color, with hopeful monsters and terrifying insurgencies intermittently rupturing the genre�s pallid certainties. Drawing together African American SF and indigenous futurism, Black and Brown Planets suggests that now at last their time is here.��Mark Bould, reader in film and literature at The University of the West of England and co-editor of Science Fiction Film and Television -From Isiah Lavender's powerful introduction in which he recounts his first memories of racial otherness and of being the target of racism to Robin Anne Reid's pioneering coda in which she brings to SF fan studies the analytical tools of computational linguistics in the service of constructing a social ontology of race, with a dozen fine essays in between, Black and Brown Planets significantly expands and intensifies our understanding of the ways in which 'the literature of the future' has sometimes earnestly grappled with, sometimes simply erased, and sometimes blithely ignored issues of race. The essays in this collection extend the color line studied in Lavender's Race in American Science Fiction to global color lines, including those involving indigenous peoples in America, Brazil, Mexico, and Thailand, always with an eye toward ways in which race and ethnicity figure in the construction of SF societies.---Brooks Landon, Herman J. and Eileen S. Schmidt Professor at the University of Iowa -Isiah Lavender has assembled some of the field's top scholars and most important emerging voices in an essential volume that shows the range and depth of science fiction's engagement with questions of race and racism. This groundbreaking collection combines work on well-known writers of colour such as Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler with analysis of work by indigenous and Latino writers such as Leslie Marmon Silko and Ernest Hogan. Reading this collection leaves no doubt that racial difference structures the science fictional imagination, and Lavender's volume demonstrates both the dangers of complicity with imperialist ideology to which SF can succumb and the power of its tools in the hands of writers of colour to resist and revise racist stereotypes and articulate a more promising future. Black and Brown Planets promises to be an indispensable reference for understanding the critical ethnic imaginaries of twenty-first century science fiction.---Sherryl Vint, professor of science fiction media studies, co-director of the Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies Program, University of California, Riverside -Since Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, science fiction has been troubled by color, with hopeful monsters and terrifying insurgencies intermittently rupturing the genre's pallid certainties. Drawing together African American SF and indigenous futurism, Black and Brown Planets suggests that now at last their time is here.---Mark Bould, reader in film and literature at The University of the West of England and co-editor of Science Fiction Film and Television "From Isiah Lavender's powerful introduction in which he recounts his first memories of racial otherness and of being the target of racism to Robin Anne Reid's pioneering coda in which she brings to SF fan studies the analytical tools of computational linguistics in the service of constructing a social ontology of race, with a dozen fine essays in between, Black and Brown Planets significantly expands and intensifies our understanding of the ways in which 'the literature of the future' has sometimes earnestly grappled with, sometimes simply erased, and sometimes blithely ignored issues of race. The essays in this collection extend the color line studied in Lavender's Race in American Science Fiction to global color lines, including those involving indigenous peoples in America, Brazil, Mexico, and Thailand, always with an eye toward ways in which race and ethnicity figure in the construction of SF societies."--Brooks Landon, Herman J. and Eileen S. Schmidt Professor at the University of Iowa "Isiah Lavender has assembled some of the field's top scholars and most important emerging voices in an essential volume that shows the range and depth of science fiction's engagement with questions of race and racism. This groundbreaking collection combines work on well-known writers of colour such as Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler with analysis of work by indigenous and Latino writers such as Leslie Marmon Silko and Ernest Hogan. Reading this collection leaves no doubt that racial difference structures the science fictional imagination, and Lavender's volume demonstrates both the dangers of complicity with imperialist ideology to which SF can succumb and the power of its tools in the hands of writers of colour to resist and revise racist stereotypes and articulate a more promising future. Black and Brown Planets promises to be an indispensable reference for understanding the critical ethnic imaginaries of twenty-first century science fiction."--Sherryl Vint, professor of science fiction media studies, co-director of the Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies Program, University of California, Riverside "Since Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, science fiction has been troubled by color, with hopeful monsters and terrifying insurgencies intermittently rupturing the genre's pallid certainties. Drawing together African American SF and indigenous futurism, Black and Brown Planets suggests that now at last their time is here."--Mark Bould, reader in film and literature at The University of the West of England and co-editor of Science Fiction Film and Television From Isiah Lavender s powerful introduction in which he recounts his first memories of racial otherness and of being the target of racism to Robin Anne Reid s pioneering coda in which she brings to SF fan studies the analytical tools of computational linguistics in the service of constructing a social ontology of race, with a dozen fine essays in between, Black and Brown Planets significantly expands and intensifies our understanding of the ways in which the literature of the future has sometimes earnestly grappled with, sometimes simply erased, and sometimes blithely ignored issues of race. The essays in this collection extend the color line studied in Lavender s Race in American Science Fiction to global color lines, including those involving indigenous peoples in America, Brazil, Mexico, and Thailand, always with an eye toward ways in which race and ethnicity figure in the construction of SF societies. Brooks Landon, Herman J. and Eileen S. Schmidt Professor at the University of Iowa" Isiah Lavender has assembled some of the field s top scholars and most important emerging voices in an essential volume that shows the range and depth of science fiction s engagement with questions of race and racism. This groundbreaking collection combines work on well-known writers of colour such as Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler with analysis of work by indigenous and Latino writers such as Leslie Marmon Silko and Ernest Hogan. Reading this collection leaves no doubt that racial difference structures the science fictional imagination, and Lavender s volume demonstrates both the dangers of complicity with imperialist ideology to which SF can succumb and the power of its tools in the hands of writers of colour to resist and revise racist stereotypes and articulate a more promising future. Black and Brown Planets promises to be an indispensable reference for understanding the critical ethnic imaginaries of twenty-first century science fiction. Sherryl Vint, professor of science fiction media studies, co-director of the Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies Program, University of California, Riverside" Since Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, science fiction has been troubled by color, with hopeful monsters and terrifying insurgencies intermittently rupturing the genre s pallid certainties. Drawing together African American SF and indigenous futurism, Black and Brown Planets suggests that now at last their time is here. Mark Bould, reader in film and literature at The University of the West of England and co-editor of Science Fiction Film and Television" From Isiah Lavender s powerful introduction in which he recounts his first memories of racial otherness and of being the target of racism to Robin Anne Reid s pioneering coda in which she brings to SF fan studies the analytical tools of computational linguistics in the service of constructing a social ontology of race, with a dozen fine essays in between, "Black and Brown Planets" significantly expands and intensifies our understanding of the ways in which the literature of the future has sometimes earnestly grappled with, sometimes simply erased, and sometimes blithely ignored issues of race. The essays in this collection extend the color line studied in Lavender s "Race in American Science Fiction" to global color lines, including those involving indigenous peoples in America, Brazil, Mexico, and Thailand, always with an eye toward ways in which race and ethnicity figure in the construction of SF societies. Brooks Landon, Herman J. and Eileen S. Schmidt Professor at the University of Iowa" Isiah Lavender has assembled some of the field s top scholars and most important emerging voices in an essential volume that shows the range and depth of science fiction s engagement with questions of race and racism. This groundbreaking collection combines work on well-known writers of colour such as Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler with analysis of work by indigenous and Latino writers such as Leslie Marmon Silko and Ernest Hogan. Reading this collection leaves no doubt that racial difference structures the science fictional imagination, and Lavender s volume demonstrates both the dangers of complicity with imperialist ideology to which SF can succumb and the power of its tools in the hands of writers of colour to resist and revise racist stereotypes and articulate a more promising future. "Black and Brown Planets" promises to be an indispensable reference for understanding the critical ethnic imaginaries of twenty-first century science fiction. Sherryl Vint, professor of science fiction media studies, co-director of the Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies Program, University of California, Riverside" Since Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, science fiction has been troubled by color, with hopeful monsters and terrifying insurgencies intermittently rupturing the genre s pallid certainties. Drawing together African American SF and indigenous futurism, "Black and Brown Planets" suggests that now at last their time is here. Mark Bould, reader in film and literature at The University of the West of England and co-editor of "Science Fiction Film and Television"" "Since Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, science fiction has been troubled by color, with hopeful monsters and terrifying insurgencies intermittently rupturing the genre's pallid certainties. Drawing together African American SF and indigenous futurism, "Black and Brown Planets" suggests that now at last their time is here."--Mark Bould, reader in film and literature at The University of the West of England and co-editor of "Science Fiction Film and Television" "From Isiah Lavender's powerful introduction in which he recounts his first memories of racial otherness and of being the target of racism to Robin Anne Reid's pioneering coda in which she brings to SF fan studies the analytical tools of computational linguistics in the service of constructing a social ontology of race, with a dozen fine essays in between, "Black and Brown Planets" significantly expands and intensifies our understanding of the ways in which 'the literature of the future' has sometimes earnestly grappled with, sometimes simply erased, and sometimes blithely ignored issues of race. The essays in this collection extend the color line studied in Lavender's "Race in American Science Fiction" to global color lines, including those involving indigenous peoples in America, Brazil, Mexico, and Thailand, always with an eye toward ways in which race and ethnicity figure in the construction of SF societies."--Brooks Landon, Herman J. and Eileen S. Schmidt Professor at the University of Iowa "Isiah Lavender has assembled some of the field's top scholars and most important emerging voices in an essential volume that shows the range and depth of science fiction's engagement with questions of race and racism. This groundbreaking collection combines work on well-known writers of colour such as Samuel R. Delany and Octavia Butler with analysis of work by indigenous and Latino writers such as Leslie Marmon Silko and Ernest Hogan. Reading this collection leaves no doubt that racial difference structures the science fictional imagination, and Lavender's volume demonstrates both the dangers of complicity with imperialist ideology to which SF can succumb and the power of its tools in the hands of writers of colour to resist and revise racist stereotypes and articulate a more promising future. "Black and Brown Planets" promises to be an indispensable reference for understanding the critical ethnic imaginaries of twenty-first century science fiction."--Sherryl Vint, professor of science fiction media studies, co-director of the Science Fiction and Technoculture Studies Program, University of California, Riverside

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