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Aquinas on the Twofold Human Good: Reason and Human Happiness in Aquinass Moral Science

Denis J. M. Bradley

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ISBN 10: 0813209528 / ISBN 13: 9780813209524
Editorial: Catholic University of America Press
Nuevos Condición: New Encuadernación de tapa blanda
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Descripción

Paperback. 610 pages. Dimensions: 8.5in. x 5.9in. x 1.5in.For many years, philosophers have read Aquinass ethical writings as if his moral doctrine ought to make sense completely apart from the commitments of Christian faith. Because Aquinas relied heavily upon rational arguments, and upon Aristotle in particular, scholars have frequently attempted to read his texts in a strictly philosophical context. According to Denis J. M. Bradley, this approach is misguided and can lead to a radical misinterpretation of Aquinass moral science. Here, Bradley sets out to prove that Aquinas was a theologian before all else and that any systematic Thomistic ethics must remain theological--not philosophical. Against the background of Aristotles Nicomachean Ethics, the author provides a detailed differentiation between Aristotles and Aquinass views on moral principles and the end of man. He points out that Aquinas himself provided a powerful critique of remaining within the limits of Aristotelian philosophical naturalism in ethics. Human natures openness to its de facto supernatural end, which is the focal point of Thomistic moral science, obviates any attempt to reconstruct a systematic, quasi-Aristotelian ethics from the extracted elements of Aquinass moral science. Aquinass critique of Aristotle leads to a paradoxical philosophical conception of human nature: short of attaining its ultimate supernatural end, the gratuitous vision of the divine essence, human nature in history and even in eternity is naturally endless. In concluding, Bradley suggests that it is the Christian philosopher who, by explicitly embracing the theological meaning of mans paradoxical natural endlessness, can best engage a postmodernism that repudiates any ultimate rational grounds for human thought and morality. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Denis J. M. Bradley is a member of the department of philosophy at Georgetown University and a former fellow of the American Academy in Rome. PRAISE FOR THE BOOK: Bradleys contribution to the study of Aquinas is important. From the standpoint of a historian, his main achievement is to clarify the dialogue between Aquinas and Aristotle. This fulfills a long-time desideratum: the subject has been treated by many scholars. . . but Bradley is the first who has studied virtually all relevant texts in detail, with convincing results. He establishes a new status quaestionis from which all further research must start. -- Prof. Wolfgang Kluxen, University of BonnA helpful introduction to some of the main themes of Thomistic and Aristotelian morality. -- Choice This item ships from multiple locations. Your book may arrive from Roseburg,OR, La Vergne,TN. N° de ref. de la librería 9780813209524

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Detalles bibliográficos

Título: Aquinas on the Twofold Human Good: Reason ...

Editorial: Catholic University of America Press

Encuadernación: Paperback

Condición del libro:New

Tipo de libro: Paperback

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Sinopsis:

For many years, philosophers have read Aquinas's ethical writings as if his moral doctrine ought to make sense completely apart from the commitments of Christian faith. Because Aquinas relied heavily upon rational arguments, and upon Aristotle in particular, scholars have frequently attempted to read his texts in a strictly philosophical context. According to Denis J. M. Bradley, this approach is misguided and can lead to a radical misinterpretation of Aquinas's moral science. Here, Bradley sets out to prove that Aquinas was a theologian before all else and that any systematic Thomistic ethics must remain theological―not philosophical.



Against the background of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, the author provides a detailed differentiation between Aristotle's and Aquinas's views on moral principles and the end of man. He points out that Aquinas himself provided a powerful critique of remaining within the limits of Aristotelian philosophical naturalism in ethics. Human nature's openness to its de facto supernatural end, which is the focal point of Thomistic moral science, obviates any attempt to reconstruct a systematic, quasi-Aristotelian ethics from the extracted elements of Aquinas's moral science. Aquinas's critique of Aristotle leads to a paradoxical philosophical conception of human nature: short of attaining its ultimate supernatural end, the gratuitous vision of the divine essence, human nature in history and even in eternity is naturally endless.



In concluding, Bradley suggests that it is the Christian philosopher who, by explicitly embracing the theological meaning of man's paradoxical natural endlessness, can best engage a postmodernism that repudiates any ultimate rational grounds for human thought and morality.



ABOUT THE AUTHOR:


Denis J. M. Bradley is a member of the department of philosophy at Georgetown University and a former fellow of the American Academy in Rome.

PRAISE FOR THE BOOK:


"Bradley's contribution to the study of Aquinas is important. From the standpoint of a historian, his main achievement is to clarify the 'dialogue' between Aquinas and Aristotle. This fulfills a long-time desideratum: the subject has been treated by many scholars . . . but Bradley is the first who has studied virtually all relevant texts in detail, with convincing results. He establishes a new status quaestionis from which all further research must start."― Prof. Wolfgang Kluxen, University of Bonn

"A helpful introduction to some of the main themes of Thomistic and Aristotelian morality."―Choice

Review:

Against the background of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, Bradley provides a detailed differentiation between Aristotle's and Aquinas's view on moral principles and the end of man. "A helpful introduction to some of the main themes of Thomistic and Aristotelian morality."

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