Law Robert Lingat The Classical Law of India

ISBN 13: 9788121506106

The Classical Law of India

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9788121506106: The Classical Law of India

This book discusses pertinent and contentious issues such as the relationship of religious communities and state, minority rights, secularism and reservations in the context of democratic politics.

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Text: English, French (translation)

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1.

Robert Lingat
Editorial: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.? (1993)
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: > 20
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BookVistas
(New Delhi, DELHI, India)
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Descripción Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.?, 1993. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. 1 B/w Illustration Ilustrador. First Indian Edition. For many centuries the Hindu population of the Indian subcontinent has largely observed a legal system derived from the Dharmasastra, or "science of righteousness," the indigenous holy law of the land. This legal system, the oldest in existence, is superior in depth and diversity even to Roman law; yet its development has been shaped neither by formal legislation nor by judicial precedent but instead by unique religious concepts that, prescribing rules of conduct to be observed in accordance with one's station in society, gradually acquired the force of law. The word dharma, which may be translated as "duty," in effect expresses conformity with what Hindus regard as the natural order of things; hence its association with law. The Brahmanical Codes, then, may not have constituted legislation in the usual sense, but they did influence the development of formal law in India. Accordingly, students of comparative law and of legal history will find much of interest in M. Lingat's lucid analysis of this ancient system. He begins with a survey of the literature relating to dharma in order to emphasize its extent and influence on Indian thought. Appraising the spirit in which the Codes were composed and charting their relationship to custom on the one hand and to the royal will on the other, M. Lingat demonstrates (by reference to the commentatorial literature of the ninth century and after) how custom was preserved and the king's order recognized without compromising the supremacy of the law. He studies the precepts in and through which the notion of dharma is expressed, and investigates how and to what extent the rule of dharma acquired the force of law. The discussion concludes with an overview of the evolution of the classical Indian legal system as it interacted with other legal systems both in India, first under Muslim and then under British rule, and also in the Buddhist countries of Southeast Asia. Nº de ref. de la librería MRML-9788121506106

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2.

Robert Lingat
Editorial: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt Ltd, New Delhi (1993)
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
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Descripción Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt Ltd, New Delhi, 1993. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. First Indian Edition. 323pp. For many centuries the Hindu population of the Indian subcontinent has largely observed a legal system derived from the Dharmasastra, or science of righteousness, the indigenous holy law of the land. This legal system, the oldest in existence, is superior in depth and diversity even to Roman law; yet its development has been shaped neither by formal legislation nor by judicial precedent but instead by unique religious concepts that, prescribing rules of conduct to be observed in accordance with ones station in society, gradually acquired the force of law. The word dharma, which may be translated as duty, in effect expresses conformity with what Hindus regard as the natural order of things; hence its association with law. The Brahmanical Codes, then, may not have constituted legislation in the usual sense, but they did influence the development of formal law in India. Accordingly, students of comparative law and of legal history will find much of interest in M. Lingats lucid analysis of this ancient system. He begins with a survey of the literature relating to dharma in order to emphasize its extent and influence on Indian thought. Appraising the spirit in which the Codes were composed and charting their relationship to custom on the one hand and to the royal will on the other, M. Lingat demonstrates (by reference to the commentatorial literature of the ninth century and after) how custom was preserved and the kings order recognized without compromising the supremacy of the law. He studies the precepts in and through which the notion of dharma is expressed, and investigates how and to what extent the rule of dharma acquired the force of law. The discussion concludes with an overview of the evolution of the classical Indian legal system as it interacted with other legal systems both in India, first under Muslim and then under British rule, and also in the Buddhist countries of Southeast Asia. Nº de ref. de la librería 395611

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3.

Robert Lingat
Editorial: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd. (1993)
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: > 20
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A - Z Books
(New Delhi, DELHI, India)
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Descripción Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., 1993. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. 1 B/w Illustration Ilustrador. First Indian Edition. For many centuries the Hindu population of the Indian subcontinent has largely observed a legal system derived from the Dharmasastra, or "science of righteousness," the indigenous holy law of the land. This legal system, the oldest in existence, is superior in depth and diversity even to Roman law; yet its development has been shaped neither by formal legislation nor by judicial precedent but instead by unique religious concepts that, prescribing rules of conduct to be observed in accordance with one's station in society, gradually acquired the force of law. The word dharma, which may be translated as "duty," in effect expresses conformity with what Hindus regard as the natural order of things; hence its association with law. The Brahmanical Codes, then, may not have constituted legislation in the usual sense, but they did influence the development of formal law in India. Accordingly, students of comparative law and of legal history will find much of interest in M. Lingat's lucid analysis of this ancient system. He begins with a survey of the literature relating to dharma in order to emphasize its extent and influence on Indian thought. Appraising the spirit in which the Codes were composed and charting their relationship to custom on the one hand and to the royal will on the other, M. Lingat demonstrates (by reference to the commentatorial literature of the ninth century and after) how custom was preserved and the king's order recognized without compromising the supremacy of the law. He studies the precepts in and through which the notion of dharma is expressed, and investigates how and to what extent the rule of dharma acquired the force of law. The discussion concludes with an overview of the evolution of the classical Indian legal system as it interacted with other legal systems both in India, first under Muslim and then under British rule, and also in the Buddhist countries of Southeast Asia. Nº de ref. de la librería MRML-9788121506106

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4.

Robert Lingat
Editorial: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, India (1993)
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: > 20
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Descripción Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, India, 1993. Hardbound. Estado de conservación: New. Estado de la sobrecubierta: New. First Indian Edition. For many centuries the Hindu population of the Indian subcontinent has largely observed a legal system derived from the Dharmasastra, or "science of righteousness," the indigenous holy law of the land. This legal system, the oldest in existence, is superior in depth and diversity even to Roman law; yet its development has been shaped neither by formal legislation nor by judicial precedent but instead by unique religious concepts that, prescribing rules of conduct to be observed in accordance with one's station in society, gradually acquired the force of law. The word dharma, which may be translated as "duty," in effect expresses conformity with what Hindus regard as the natural order of things; hence its association with law. The Brahmanical Codes, then, may not have constituted legislation in the usual sense, but they did influence the development of formal law in India. Accordingly, students of comparative law and of legal history will find much of interest in M. Lingat's lucid analysis of this ancient system. He begins with a survey of the literature relating to dharma in order to emphasize its extent and influence on Indian thought. Appraising the spirit in which the Codes were composed and charting their relationship to custom on the one hand and to the royal will on the other, M. Lingat demonstrates (by reference to the commentatorial literature of the ninth century and after) how custom was preserved and the king's order recognized without compromising the supremacy of the law. He studies the precepts in and through which the notion of dharma is expressed, and investigates how and to what extent the rule of dharma acquired the force of law. The discussion concludes with an overview of the evolution of the classical Indian legal system as it interacted with other legal systems both in India, first under Muslim and then under British rule, and also in the Buddhist countries of Southeast Asia. Size: 14 Cms x 22 Cms. Nº de ref. de la librería 026943

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5.

Robert Lingat
Editorial: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd. (1993)
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
Nuevos Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: > 20
Librería
BookVistas
(New Delhi, DELHI, India)
Valoración
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Descripción Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., 1993. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. First edition. For many centuries the Hindu population of the Indian subcontinent has largely observed a legal system derived from the Dharmasastra, or "science of righteousness," the indigenous holy law of the land. This legal system, the oldest in existence, is superior in depth and diversity even to Roman law; yet its development has been shaped neither by formal legislation nor by judicial precedent but instead by unique religious concepts that, prescribing rules of conduct to be observed in accordance with one`s station in society, gradually acquired the force of law. The word dharma, which may be translated as "duty," in effect expresses conformity with what Hindus regard as the natural order of things; hence its association with law. The Brahmanical Codes, then, may not have constituted legislation in the usual sense, but they did influence the development of formal law in India. Accordingly, students of comparative law and of legal history will find much of interest in M. Lingat`s lucid analysis of this ancient system. He begins with a survey of the literature relating to dharma in order to emphasize its extent and influence on Indian thought. Appraising the spirit in which the Codes were composed and charting their relationship to custom on the one hand and to the royal will on the other, M. Lingat demonstrates (by reference to the commentatorial literature of the ninth century and after) how custom was preserved and the king`s order recognized without compromising the supremacy of the law. He studies the precepts in and through which the notion of dharma is expressed, and investigates how and to what extent the rule of dharma acquired the force of law. The discussion concludes with an overview of the evolution of the classical Indian legal system as it interacted with other legal systems both in India, first under Muslim and then under British rule, and also in the Buddhist countries of Southeast Asia. Printed Pages: 324. Nº de ref. de la librería 33

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6.

Robert Lingat
Editorial: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, India (1993)
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: > 20
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(New Delhi, DELHI, India)
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Descripción Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, India, 1993. Hardbound. Estado de conservación: New. Estado de la sobrecubierta: New. First Indian Edition. For many centuries the Hindu population of the Indian subcontinent has largely observed a legal system derived from the Dharmasastra, or "science of righteousness," the indigenous holy law of the land. This legal system, the oldest in existence, is superior in depth and diversity even to Roman law; yet its development has been shaped neither by formal legislation nor by judicial precedent but instead by unique religious concepts that, prescribing rules of conduct to be observed in accordance with one's station in society, gradually acquired the force of law. The word dharma, which may be translated as "duty," in effect expresses conformity with what Hindus regard as the natural order of things; hence its association with law. The Brahmanical Codes, then, may not have constituted legislation in the usual sense, but they did influence the development of formal law in India. Accordingly, students of comparative law and of legal history will find much of interest in M. Lingat's lucid analysis of this ancient system. He begins with a survey of the literature relating to dharma in order to emphasize its extent and influence on Indian thought. Appraising the spirit in which the Codes were composed and charting their relationship to custom on the one hand and to the royal will on the other, M. Lingat demonstrates (by reference to the commentatorial literature of the ninth century and after) how custom was preserved and the king's order recognized without compromising the supremacy of the law. He studies the precepts in and through which the notion of dharma is expressed, and investigates how and to what extent the rule of dharma acquired the force of law. The discussion concludes with an overview of the evolution of the classical Indian legal system as it interacted with other legal systems both in India, first under Muslim and then under British rule, and also in the Buddhist countries of Southeast Asia. Size: 14 Cms x 22 Cms. Nº de ref. de la librería 026943

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7.

Derrett M. Duncan J. Lingat Robert
Editorial: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
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Majestic Books
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Descripción Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers. Estado de conservación: New. pp. xviii + 305, Frontispiece , Illus. Nº de ref. de la librería 7849887

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8.

Robert Lingat
Editorial: Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd. (1993)
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
Nuevos Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: > 20
Librería
A - Z Books
(New Delhi, DELHI, India)
Valoración
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Descripción Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd., 1993. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. First edition. For many centuries the Hindu population of the Indian subcontinent has largely observed a legal system derived from the Dharmasastra, or "science of righteousness," the indigenous holy law of the land. This legal system, the oldest in existence, is superior in depth and diversity even to Roman law; yet its development has been shaped neither by formal legislation nor by judicial precedent but instead by unique religious concepts that, prescribing rules of conduct to be observed in accordance with one`s station in society, gradually acquired the force of law. The word dharma, which may be translated as "duty," in effect expresses conformity with what Hindus regard as the natural order of things; hence its association with law. The Brahmanical Codes, then, may not have constituted legislation in the usual sense, but they did influence the development of formal law in India. Accordingly, students of comparative law and of legal history will find much of interest in M. Lingat`s lucid analysis of this ancient system. He begins with a survey of the literature relating to dharma in order to emphasize its extent and influence on Indian thought. Appraising the spirit in which the Codes were composed and charting their relationship to custom on the one hand and to the royal will on the other, M. Lingat demonstrates (by reference to the commentatorial literature of the ninth century and after) how custom was preserved and the king`s order recognized without compromising the supremacy of the law. He studies the precepts in and through which the notion of dharma is expressed, and investigates how and to what extent the rule of dharma acquired the force of law. The discussion concludes with an overview of the evolution of the classical Indian legal system as it interacted with other legal systems both in India, first under Muslim and then under British rule, and also in the Buddhist countries of Southeast Asia. Printed Pages: 324. Nº de ref. de la librería 33

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9.

Robert Lingat
Editorial: South Asia Books (1993)
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 1
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Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, Estados Unidos de America)
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Descripción South Asia Books, 1993. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. book. Nº de ref. de la librería M8121506107

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Robert Lingat
ISBN 10: 8121506107 ISBN 13: 9788121506106
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Descripción Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. (Size: 23 x 15 cms), (trans. from the French with additions by J Duncan M. Derrett) 324 Year of Publication 1993 8121506107. Nº de ref. de la librería 11837

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