Susan Jacoby The Age of American Unreason

ISBN 13: 9781905847822

The Age of American Unreason

3,82 valoración promedio
( 2.573 valoraciones por Goodreads )
 
9781905847822: The Age of American Unreason

Combining historical analysis with contemporary observation, Susan Jacoby dissects a new American cultural phenomenon-one that is at odds with our heritage of Enlightenment reason and with modern, secular knowledge and science. With mordant wit, Jacoby surveys an antirationalist landscape extending from pop culture to a pseudo-intellectual universe of "junk thought." Disdain for logic and evidence defines a pervasive malaise fostered by the mass media, triumphalist religious fundamentalism, mediocre public education, a dearth of fair-minded public intellectuals on the right and the left, and, above all, a lazy and credulous public. Jacoby offers an unsparing indictment of the American addiction to infotainment-from television to the Web-and cites this toxic dependency as the major element distinguishing our current age of unreason from earlier outbreaks of American anti-intellectualism and antirationalism. With reading on the decline and scientific and historical illiteracy on the rise, an increasingly ignorant public square is dominated by debased media-driven language and received opinion. At this critical political juncture, nothing could be more important than recognizing the "overarching crisis of memory and knowledge" described in this impassioned, tough-minded book, which challenges Americans to face the painful truth about what the flights from reason has cost us as individuals and as a nation.

"Sinopsis" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

About the Author:

Susan Jacoby is an independent scholar and the bestselling author of many books, including Never Say Die, The Age of American Unreason, and Freethinkers, which was named a Notable Book of 2004 by the Washington Post and the Times Literary Supplement. She lives in New York City.

Actress and director Cassandra Campbell has narrated nearly two hundred audiobooks and has received multiple Audie Awards and more than twenty AudioFile Earphones Awards, including for Orange Is the New Black by Piper Kerman.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

The Way We Live Now: Just Us Folks

The word is everywhere, a plague spread by the President of the United States, television anchors, radio talk show hosts, preachers in megachurches, self-help gurus, and anyone else attempting to demonstrate his or her identification with ordinary, presumably wholesome American values. Only a few decades ago, Americans were addressed as people or, in the more distant past, ladies and gentlemen. Now we are all folks. Television commentators, apparently confusing themselves with the clergy, routinely declare that “our prayers go out to those folks”—whether the folks are victims of drought, hurricane, flood, child molestation, corporate layoffs, identity theft, or the war in Iraq (as long as the victims are American and not Iraqi). Irony is reserved for fiction. Philip Roth, in The Plot Against America—a dark historical reimagining of a nation in which Charles Lindbergh defeats Franklin D. Roosevelt in the 1940 presidential election—confers the title “Just Folks” on a Lindbergh program designed to de-Judaize young urban Jews by sending them off to spend their summers in wholesome rural and Christian settings.

While the word “folks” was once a colloquialism with no political meaning, there is no escaping the political meaning of the term when it is reverently invoked by public officials in twenty-first-century America. After the terrorist bombings in London on July 7, 2005, President Bush assured Americans, “I’ve been in contact with our homeland security folks and I instructed them to be in touch with local and state officials about the facts of what took place here and in London and to be extra vigilant as our folks start heading to work.” Bush went on to observe that “the contrast couldn’t be clearer, between the intentions of those of us who care deeply about human rights and human liberty, and those who’ve got such evil in their heart that they will take the lives of innocent folks.” Those evil terrorists. Our innocent folks. Even homeland security officials, who—one lives in hope—are supposed to be highly trained experts, cannot escape the folkish designation. All of the 2008 presidential contenders pepper their speeches with appeals to folks, but only John Edwards, who grew up poor in North Carolina, sounds as if he was raised around people who actually used the word in everyday conversation. Every time Hillary Rodham Clinton, brought up in a conservative Republican household in an upper-middle-class suburb of Chicago, utters the word “folks,” she sounds like a hovering parent trying to ingratiate herself with her children’s friends by using teenage slang.

The specific political use of folks as an exclusionary and inclusionary signal, designed to make the speaker sound like one of the boys or girls, is symptomatic of a debasement of public speech inseparable from a more general erosion of American cultural standards. Casual, colloquial language also conveys an implicit denial of the seriousness of whatever issue is being debated: talking about folks going off to war is the equivalent of describing rape victims as girls (unless the victims are, in fact, little girls and not grown women). Look up any important presidential speech in the history of the United States before 1980, and you will not find one patronizing appeal to folks. Imagine: We here highly resolve that these folks shall not have died in vain . . . and that government of the folks, by the folks, for the folks, shall not perish from the earth. In the 1950s, even though there were no orators of Lincoln’s eloquence on the political scene, voters still expected their leaders to employ dignified, if not necessarily erudite, speech. Adlai Stevenson may have sounded too much like an intellectual to suit the taste of average Americans, but proper grammar and respectful forms of address were mandatory for anyone seeking high office.

The gold standard of presidential oratory for adult Americans in the fifties was the memory of Roosevelt, whose patrician accent in no way detracted from his extraordinary ability to make a direct connection with ordinary people. It is impossible to read the transcripts of FDR’s famous fireside chats and not mourn the passing of a civic culture that appealed to Americans to expand their knowledge and understanding instead of pandering to the lowest common denominator. Calling for sacrifice and altruism in perilous times, Roosevelt would no more have addressed his fellow citizens as folks than he would have uttered an obscenity over the radio. At the end of 1940, attempting to prepare his countrymen for the coming of war, the president spoke in characteristic terms to the public:

"Tonight, in the presence of a world crisis, my mind goes back eight years to a night in the midst of a domestic crisis . . . I well remember that while I sat in my study in the White House, preparing to talk to the people of the United States, I had before my eyes the picture of all those Americans with whom I was talking. I saw the workmen in the mills, the mines, the factories; the girl behind the counter; the small shopkeeper; the farmer doing his spring plowing; the widows and the old men wondering about their life’s savings. I tried to convey to the great mass of the American people what the banking crisis meant to them in their daily lives.

Tonight I want to do the same thing, with the same people, in this new crisis which faces America. . . .

We must be the great arsenal of democracy. For us this is an emergency as serious as war itself. We must apply ourselves to the task with the same resolution, the same sense of urgency, the same spirit of patriotism and sacrifice as we would show were we at war. . . .

As president of the United States I call for that national effort. I call for it in the name of this nation which we love and honor and which we are privileged and proud to serve. I call upon our people with absolute confidence that our common cause will greatly succeed."[1]

Substitute folks for people, farmer, old men, and widows, and the relationship between the abandonment of dignified public speech and the degradation of the political process becomes clear. To call for resolution and a spirit of patriotism and sacrifice is to call upon people to rise above their everyday selves and to behave as true citizens. To keep telling Americans that they are just folks is to expect nothing special—a ratification and exaltation of the quotidian that is one of the distinguishing marks of anti-intellectualism in any era.

The debasement of the nation’s speech is evident in virtually everything broadcast and podcast on radio, television, and the Internet. In this true, all-encompassing public square, homogenized language and homogenized thought reinforce each other in circular fashion. As George Orwell noted in 1946, “A man may take to drink because he feels himself a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that is happening to the English language. It becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts.”[2] In this continuous blurring of clarity and intellectual discrimination, political speech is always ahead of the curve—especially because today’s media possess the power to amplify and spread error with an efficiency that might have astonished even Orwell. Consider the near-universal substitution, by the media and politicians, of “troop” and “troops” for “soldier” and “soldiers.” As every dictionary makes plain, the word “troop” is always a collective noun; the “s” is added when referring to a particularly large military force. Yet each night on the television news, correspondents report that “X troops were killed in Iraq today.” This is more than a grammatical error; turning a soldier—an individual with whom one may identify—into an anonymous-sounding troop encourages the public to think about war and its casualties in a more abstract way. Who lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Troop? It is difficult to determine exactly how, why, or when this locution began to enter the common language. Soldiers were almost never described as troops during the Second World War, except when a large military operation (like the Allied landing on D-Day) was being discussed, and the term remained extremely uncommon throughout the Vietnam era. My guess is that some dimwits in the military and the media (perhaps the military media) decided, at some point in the 1980s, that the word “soldier” implied the masculine gender and that all soldiers, out of respect for the growing presence of women in the military, must henceforth be called troops. Like unremitting appeals to folks, the victory of troops over soldiers offers an impressive illustration of the relationship between fuzzy thinking and the debasement of everyday speech.

By debased speech, I do not mean bad grammar, although there is plenty of that on every street corner and talk show, or the prevalence of obscene language, so widespread as to be deprived of force and meaning at those rare times when only an epithet will do. Nor am I talking about Spanglish and so-called Black English, those favorite targets of cultural conservatives—although I share the conservatives’ belief that public schools ought to concentrate on teaching standard English. But the standard of standard American English, and the ways in which private speech now mirrors the public speech emanating from electronic and digital media, is precisely the problem. Debased speech in the public square functions as a kind of low-level toxin, imperceptibly coarsening our concept of what is and is not acceptable until someone says something so revolting—Don Imus’s notorious description of female African-American college basketball players as “nappy-headed hos” is the perfect example—that it produces a rare, and always brief, moment of public consciousness about the meaning and power of words. Predictably, the Imus affair proved to be a missed opportunity for a larger cultural conversation about the level of all American public discourse and language. People only wanted to talk about bigotry—a worthy and vital conversation, to be sure, but one that quickly degenerated into a comparative lexicon of racial and ethnic victimology. Would Imus have been fired for calling someone a faggot or a dyke? What if he had only called the women hos, without the additional racial insult of nappy-headed? And how about Muslims? Didn’t Ann Coulter denigrate them as “ragheads” (a slur of which I was blissfully unaware until an indignant multiculturalist reported it on the op-ed page of The New York Times).[3] The awful reality is that all of these epithets, often accompanied by the F-word, are the common currency of public and private speech in today’s America. They are used not only because many Americans are infected by various degrees of bigotry but because nearly all Americans are afflicted by a poverty of language that cheapens humor and serious discourse alike. The hapless Imus unintentonially made this point when he defended his remarks on grounds that they had been made within a humorous context. “This is a comedy show,” he said, “not a racial rant.” Wrong on both counts. Nothing reveals a lack of comic inventiveness more reliably than the presence of reflexive epithets, eliciting snickers not because they exist within any intentional “context” but simply because they are crass words that someone is saying out loud.

Part of Imus’s audience was undoubtedly composed of hard-core racists and misogynists, but many more who found his rants amusing were responding in the spirit of eight-year-olds laughing at farts. Imus’s “serious” political commentary was equally pedestrian. He frequently enjoined officials who had incurred his displeasure to “just shut up,” displaying approximately the same level of sophistication as Vice President Dick Cheney when he told Senator Patrick J. Leahy on the Senate floor, “Go fuck yourself.” As the genuinely humorous Russell Baker observes, previous generations of politicians (even if they had felt free to issue the physically impossible Anglo-Saxon injunction in a public forum) would have been shamed by their lack of verbal inventiveness. In the 1890s, Speaker of the House Thomas Reed took care of one opponent by observing that “with a few more brains he could be a halfwit.” Of another politician, Reed remarked, “He never opens his mouth without subtracting from the sum of human intelligence.”[4] Americans once heard (or rather, read) such genuinely witty remarks and tried to emulate that wit. Today we parrot the witless and halfwitted language used by politicians and radio shock jocks alike.

The mirroring process extends far beyond political language, which has always existed at a certain remove from colloquial speech. The toxin of commercially standardized speech now stocks the private vault of words and images we draw on to think about and to describe everything from the ridiculous to the sublime. One of the most frequently butchered sentences on television programs, for instance, is the incomparable Liberace’s cynically funny, “I cried all the way to the bank”—a line he trotted out whenever serious critics lambasted his candelabra-lit performances as kitsch.[5] The witty observation has been transformed into the senseless catchphrase, “I laughed all the way to the bank”—often used as a non sequitur after news stories about lottery winners. In their dual role as creators of public language and as microphones amplifying and disseminating the language many American already use in their daily lives, the media constitute a perpetuum mobile, the perfect example of a machine in which cause and effect can never be separated. A sports broadcaster, speaking of an athlete who just signed a multi-year, multi-million-dollar contract, says, “He laughed all the way to the bank.” A child idly listening—perhaps playing a video game on a computer at the same time—absorbs the meaningless statement without thinking and repeats it, spreading it to others who might one day be interviewed on television and say, “I laughed all the way to the bank,” thereby transmitting the virus to new listeners. It is all reminiscent of the exchange among Alice, the March Hare, and the Mad Hatter in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. “Then you should say what you mean,” the March Hare tells Alice. “ ‘I do,’ Alice hastily replied; ‘at least—at least I mean what I say—that’s the same thing, you know.’ ” The Hatter chimes in, “Not the same thing a bit! Why, you might just as well say that ‘I see what I eat’ is the same thing as ‘I eat what I see’!” In an ignorant and anti-intellectual culture, people eat mainly what they see.
NOTES

[1] Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Fireside Chats (New York, 1995), pp. 48-49, 62-63.
[2] George Orwell, “Politics and the English Language,” Horizon, 76 (London: 1946); www.orwell.ru/library/essays/politics/english/e_polit.
[3] Robert Wright, “Shock Talk Without Apologies,” New York Times, April 14, 2007.
[4] Russell Baker, “Talking It Up,” New York Review of Books, May 11, 2006.
[5] Liberace first used this line in 1957, when he won a libel judgment against the British tabloid Daily Mirror, which published a column calling the entertainer a “deadly, winking, sniggering, snuggling, chromium-plated, scent-impregnated, luminous, giggling, fruit-flavored, mincing, ice-covered heap of mother love.” The British court concluded that the article had libelously implied that Liberace was a homosexual (which, of course he was, but there was no proof).
From the Hardcover edition.

"Sobre este título" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

Comprar usado Ver libro

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,39
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America

Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

Añadir al carrito

Los mejores resultados en AbeBooks

1.

Jacoby, Susan
Editorial: Old Street Publishing (2009)
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Cantidad: 1
Librería
Better World Books Ltd
(Dunfermline, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Old Street Publishing, 2009. Estado de conservación: Very Good. Ships from the UK. Former Library book. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. Nº de ref. de la librería GRP96712840

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 0,86
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,39
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

2.

Susan Jacoby
Editorial: Old Street Publishing (2009)
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
Revival Books Ltd
(Rossendale, LANCS, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Old Street Publishing, 2009. Paperback. Estado de conservación: Good. Minor shelf wear Good condition is defined as: a copy that has been read but remains in clean condition. All of the pages are intact and the cover is intact and the spine may show signs of wear. The book may have minor markings which are not specifically mentioned. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day. Nº de ref. de la librería mon0006517247

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 0,86
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,40
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

3.

Susan Jacoby
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Cantidad: 1
Librería
Seattle Goodwill
(Seattle, WA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Estado de conservación: Acceptable. May have some shelf-wear due to normal use. Nº de ref. de la librería 0KVBKH0037WI

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 1,25
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,34
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

4.

Susan Jacoby
Editorial: Old Street Publishing (2009)
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
Greener Books
(London, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Old Street Publishing, 2009. Paperback. Estado de conservación: Used; Good. **SHIPPED FROM UK** We believe you will be completely satisfied with our quick and reliable service. All orders are dispatched as swiftly as possible! Buy with confidence!. Nº de ref. de la librería 1671821

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 3,66
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,11
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

5.

Susan Jacoby
Editorial: Old Street Publishing 12/05/2009 (2009)
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Cantidad: 1
Librería
Fun_Meister
(Wallingford, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Old Street Publishing 12/05/2009, 2009. Estado de conservación: Good. Will be shipped promptly from UK warehouse. Book is in good condition with no missing pages, no damage or soiling and tight spine. There may be some dog-eared pages showing previous use but overall a great book. Nº de ref. de la librería 9053-9781905847822

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 3,27
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,64
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

6.

Susan Jacoby
Editorial: Old Street Publishing 12/05/2009 (2009)
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Cantidad: 1
Librería
Bahamut Media
(Reading, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Old Street Publishing 12/05/2009, 2009. Estado de conservación: Very Good. Shipped within 24 hours from our UK warehouse. Clean, undamaged book with no damage to pages and minimal wear to the cover. Spine still tight, in very good condition. Remember if you are not happy, you are covered by our 100% money back guarantee. Nº de ref. de la librería 6545-9781905847822

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 3,27
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,64
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

7.

Susan Jacoby
Editorial: Old Street Publishing 12/05/2009 (2009)
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Cantidad: 1
Librería
Bahamut Media
(Reading, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Old Street Publishing 12/05/2009, 2009. Estado de conservación: Good. Shipped within 24 hours from our UK warehouse. Clean, undamaged book with no damage to pages and minimal wear to the cover. Spine still tight, in good condition. Remember if you are not happy, you are covered by our 100% money back guarantee. Nº de ref. de la librería 2341-9781905847822

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 3,27
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,64
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

8.

Susan Jacoby
Editorial: -
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
AwesomeBooks
(Wallingford, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción -. Paperback. Estado de conservación: Very Good. The Age of American Unreason This book is in very good condition and will be shipped within 24 hours of ordering. The cover may have some limited signs of wear but the pages are clean, intact and the spine remains undamaged. This book has clearly been well maintained and looked after thus far. Money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. See all our books here, order more than 1 book and get discounted shipping. Nº de ref. de la librería 7719-9781905847822

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 3,73
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,64
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

9.

Susan Jacoby
Editorial: -
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
AwesomeBooks
(Wallingford, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción -. Paperback. Estado de conservación: Good. The Age of American Unreason This book is in good or better condition. It has no tears to the pages and no pages will be missing from the book. The spine of the book is still in great condition and the front cover is generally unmarked. It has signs of previous use but overall is in really nice, tight condition. Shipping is normally same day from our UK warehouse. We offer a money back guarantee if you are not satisfied. Nº de ref. de la librería 9053-9781905847822

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 3,73
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,64
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

10.

Susan Jacoby
ISBN 10: 1905847823 ISBN 13: 9781905847822
Usado Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
WorldofBooks
(Goring-By-Sea, WS, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Paperback. Estado de conservación: Good. The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact. Some minor wear to the spine. Nº de ref. de la librería GOR004437303

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar usado
EUR 7,29
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,40
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

Existen otras copia(s) de este libro

Ver todos los resultados de su búsqueda