Leading with a Limp: Turning Your Struggles into Strengths

4 valoración promedio
( 583 valoraciones por Goodreads )
 
9781578569502: Leading with a Limp: Turning Your Struggles into Strengths

Put your flawed foot forward.

Pick up most leadership books and you’ll find strategies for leveraging your power and minimizing your areas of weakness. But think about the leaders whose names have gone down in history. Most of them were so messed up that, if they were looking for work today, no executive placement service would give them the time of day.

God’s criteria for choosing leaders runs counter to the conventional wisdom. Our culture equates strength with effectiveness, but God favors leaders who know the value of brokenness.

In Leading With a Limp, you’ll discover what makes flawed leaders so successful. They’re not preoccupied with protecting their image, they are undaunted by chaos and complexity, they are ready to risk failure in moving an organization from what is to what should be. God chooses leaders who aren’t deceived by the myths of power and control, but who realize that God’s power is found in brokenness.

If you are a leader–or if you have been making excuses to avoid leading–find out how you can take full advantage of your weakness. A limping leader is the person God uses to accomplish amazing things.

To go deeper, check out the Leading With a Limp Workbook.

"Sinopsis" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

About the Author:

Dan B. Allender, PhD, is a founder of Mars Hill Graduate School near Seattle, where he serves as president. He also is a professor of counseling, a therapist in private practice, and a popular speaker. He is the author of a number of books, including To Be Told, How Children Raise Parents, The Healing Path, and The Wounded Heart. Dan and his wife, Rebecca, are the parents of three children.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

A LEADERSHIP CONFESSION
Flight Is the Only Sane Response

I don’t pet stray dogs. I was bitten on the hand when I was six. I recall watching this immaculately coiffed collie bound out of a neighbor’s yard to greet me. Its elegant, effortless movement mesmerized me. I put my hand out and, in a split second, went from being a dog lover to a child wounded in hand and heart. Since that day I’ve never fully trusted a foreign pooch. I am dog scarred—a tad suspicious, but still open to man’s best friend. The same is true in my approach to leaders known as pastors. I seldom pet a strange or even a well-known pastor. This came about after I was bitten at age twenty-six. As a lowly intern in a local church, I was earning a whopping fifty dollars a week for services that included leading a bible study, visiting church members, and walking the senior pastor’s dog. I worked with the pastor for more than a year, and after I graduated from seminary, I came back as an assistant pastor.
The senior pastor and I often played tennis together, and after one afternoon match we sat and talked about some of the things he wanted me to tackle in the coming year. He was my mentor, and I was his apt disciple. But it is also true that even though I had graduated from a fine seminary, I had the maturity of a street kid who had barely escaped death, jail, and excessive brain damage due to illicit drugs, and I had little idea how to function in the business of organized religion. The church was as foreign to me as the Junior League.
I was grateful beyond words to have a job and a future with this man and his church. We left the tennis court at five o’clock and reconvened in an elders’ meeting at six. An hour into the meeting, the senior pastor said to the leaders of our church, “I’ve come to the decision that it is best for Dan and the church to part ways.” He offered no explanation. It was a clean, simple bite. Several of the elders felt the decision was abrupt and without due diligence, so I kept my job for another eighteen months. But the handwriting was on the wall. We leaders are dangerous. They can bite without provocation or at least without logic, and it is best to stay out of their way or you’ll have to deal with the consequences. Leaders can seem capricious, aloof, narcissistic, and selfinterested. I wanted little to do with their world, so I left the complex world
of church politics and the rough-and-tumble culture of leadership to work on my doctorate. But I didn’t escape political turmoil.
The academic realm involves politics similar to the clan warfare of early marauding tribes. It is all about loyalty—allegiance to the tartan, flag, and set of convictions that mark your community as unique. If you can wield a broadax or sword well enough and speak the language of the clan, your position is secure until death. This is called tenure. I entered the clan convinced that I would never again lead any group, community, church, school, or sports team as long as I lived. In fact, one of the great advantages of being an academic was that I was expected to complain about the administration, but I didn’t have to take on any leadership responsibilities beyond teaching my classes.
Umpteen years later, six colleagues and I wrestled with the decision of whether to apply for accreditation for the graduate school we had haphazardly started in Seattle. We were in a quandary: The school that had allowed us to be a branch campus no longer wanted us. If we chose to disband, we would face humiliation as well as the possibility of lawsuits stemming from the school’s inability to fulfill its promise of offering degrees. We decided to apply for accreditation. The application required the signature of the school’s presi dent—a position we had never discussed. We really didn’t think we needed a president because we planned to operate as a nonhierarchical guild of peers without a central, decision-making figure. We would be a community, not an organization.
When the moment came for the president to sign the application, all heads in the room dropped, including my own. An awkward half minute ensued, and I looked up. Someone noticed my movement and said, “You are the oldest and the best known.” I said, “Okay, but you all know I m not really the president.” Everyone laughed. It was as obvious as a scream in the ear: I’d take the title, and we would all share the power and responsibility. The dream of a nonhierarchical community of peers collapsed under conflicting expectations, bruised feelings, immorality, and—thank God—a board that intervened and began naming failures upon failures, and called us to become an organization and leaders. We’ve been in the process for six years, and I am still president. I don’t deserve to be. Perhaps that is one of the reasons I am still asked to serve in this capacity.
Everything I despised in other leaders I have replicated in our organization. Many times I have acted precipitously in panic before gathering sufficient data. Many other times I have failed to act at all. If in one circumstance I act too slowly, it seems that I act too quickly in the next. Leadership feels like playing the slot machine in a casino. You put your best capital into the machine, pull the lever, watch the wheels spin, and come up empty handed. The question lingers: what am I doing wrong?
My colleagues and I have gone through enormous heartache and tremendous change. We are still in the middle of profound transformation, and there are days I wonder if I will survive to see the sun rise again. Last night I tossed myself through a midnight aerobics workout that continued to the early side of three o’clock in the morning. I worried, prayed, and worried about personnel matters, finances, future hires, the school’s reputation in the community, tensions among the faculty, and a host of other concerns that zapped my mind like moths flying into a bug light.
No doubt every leader feels the constant and chronic weight of obstacles, but it isn’t one problem or even a whole set that eats our lunch; it’s that each problem requires a response that seldom resolves the issue. Instead, the response simply creates multiple new problems. The weedlike problem seems to have a pod stuffed with countless seeds that will be sown the moment it is pulled, seeds that will result in a host of new weeds. And if that trouble isn’t hard enough to swallow, the real issue is more personal—having to do with the decisions and choices a leader must make, alone. Few decisions are simple. In fact, simple decisions are better called choices.
Do I want to eat now or wait for my wife to get home? Do we cancel classes when there is a foot of snow in Seattle? We make choices every day that require little thought, have few consequences, and are completed without much need for reflection or counsel. Leaders choose daily, but the real weight on their shoulders lies in the need to decide. And there are no easy decisions. To decide requires a death, a dying to a thousand options, the putting aside of a legion of possibilities in order to choose just one. De-cide. Homo-cide. Sui-cide. Patri-cide. The root word decidere means “to cut off.” All decisions cut us off, separate us, from nearly infinite options as we select just one single path. And every decision we make earns us the favor of some and the disfavor of others.
Budgetary decisions, for instance, seldom involve equal distribution of the finite resource we call money. The child who begins college may require most of a family’s disposable income. As a result, the rest of the family can’t take their summer vacation to the mountains. The decision blesses one and alienates others.
A good leader will, in time, disappoint everyone. Leadership requires a willingness to not be liked, in fact, a willingness to be hated. But it is impossible to lead people who doubt you and hate you. So the constant tug is to make the decision that is the least offensive to the greatest number and then to align yourself with those who have the most power to sustain your position and reputation in the organization. Leadership is not about problems and decisions; it is a profoundly relational enterprise that seeks to motivate people toward a vision that will require significant change and risk on everyone’s part. Decisions are simply the doors that leaders, as well as followers, walk through to get to the land where redemption can be found.

FLIGHT IS THE ONLY SANE RESPONSE
There are two common stories I hear from students who come to Mars Hill Graduate School. One group of students will say, “I didn’t want to be here. I was working in Washington DC/Portland/Charlotte/Chicago. I loved my job, my church, and my friends, but in a matter of months my life was turned upside down. It felt like God spun me around, headed me west, and here I am, not really sure why. But I am here, and I sense that this is where I am meant to be.”
The other group will say, “I knew this is where I wanted to study. I heard about the school through a book/a seminar/a student, and I have wanted to be here for years. But since I’ve come, I feel like I’m going through a crisis of confidence. I don’t know if this is really what I am supposed to do. I’m afraid, and I feel crazy for ever thinking I wanted to come here.”
Doubt is the context for surrender. And flight is the path for obedience. When we’re reluctant to lead, doubting ourselves and our call, we are ripe for growth as a leader. Likewise, when we hear the call to lead but we run in the opposite direction, God has a way of having us thrown off the boat, swallowed by a large fish, and spit onto the shore where we are to serve. If the situation weren’t so serious, it would be hilarious. God invites us to run and yet to know that he will arrive at our place of flight before we arrive so he can direct our steps...

"Sobre este título" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

Los mejores resultados en AbeBooks

1.

Dan B. Allender
Editorial: WaterBrook Press (2006)
ISBN 10: 1578569508 ISBN 13: 9781578569502
Nuevos Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción WaterBrook Press, 2006. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. book. Nº de ref. de la librería M1578569508

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 24,74
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

2.

Allender, Dan B.
Editorial: WaterBrook Press (2006)
ISBN 10: 1578569508 ISBN 13: 9781578569502
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 2
Librería
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción WaterBrook Press, 2006. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. Never used!. Nº de ref. de la librería P111578569508

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 39,05
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 1,68
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

3.

Allender, Dan B.
Editorial: WaterBrook Press (2006)
ISBN 10: 1578569508 ISBN 13: 9781578569502
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 2
Librería
Save With Sam
(North Miami, FL, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción WaterBrook Press, 2006. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. Brand New!. Nº de ref. de la librería VIB1578569508

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 39,85
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 2,54
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

4.

Allender, Dan B.
Editorial: WaterBrook Press
ISBN 10: 1578569508 ISBN 13: 9781578569502
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 4
Librería
Diafan Media
(Geneva, IL, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción WaterBrook Press. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. 1578569508 New Condition *** Right Off the Shelf | Ships within 2 Business Days ~~~ Customer Service Is Our Top Priority! - Thank you for LOOKING :-). Nº de ref. de la librería 2BOOK1P4504

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 38,58
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 4,19
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

5.

Allender, Dan B.
Editorial: WaterBrook Press
ISBN 10: 1578569508 ISBN 13: 9781578569502
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 1
Librería
Cloud 9 Books
(Wellington, FL, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción WaterBrook Press. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. 1578569508 New Condition. Nº de ref. de la librería NEW7.0683848

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 52,30
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 4,22
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío