Gaius Valerius Catullus Catullus

ISBN 13: 9781236512826

9781236512826: Catullus

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1893 edition. Excerpt: ...in your eyes. 137. hodie atque heri, but yesterday; cf. Gr. x#e-s Kal irp&riv and al trfijtpov (Ep. Heb. 13. 8). Nunc tuum cinerarius Tondet os. Miser ah miser 140 Concubine, nuces da. Diceris male te a tuis Ynguentate glabris marite Abstinere: sed abstine. O Hymen Hymenaee io, 145 O Hymen Hymenaee. Scimus haec tibi quae licent Sola cognita: sed marito Ista non eadem licent. O Hymen Hymenaee io, 150 O Hymen Hymenaee. Nupta, tu quoque quae tuus Vir petet caue ne neges, Ne petitum aliunde eat. O Hymen Hymenaee io, 155 O Hymen Hymenaee. 138. cinerarius: the slave who iam sibi tum curuis male temperal acted as hair-dresser; cf. Varr. L. L. unda carinis.--te abstinere: with V. 129 calamistrum quod his cale-the verb in this reflexive construcfactis in cinere capillus ornatur. tion cf. Ter. //«. 139 sese illa abQui ea ministrabat a cinere cine-stinere utpotuerit? rarius est appellatus. 142. unguentate: as frequently, 139. tondet os: i.e. the days of with an idea of excessive and effemiyour childhood, and with them the nate luxury.--glabris: i.e. pueris charm of your young beauty, and delicatis, plural as though, forsooth, your life of idle luxury are past; cf. the bridegroom had kept many rawMart. XI. 78. 3 flammea texuntur cubinos. sponsae, iam uirgo paratur; ton-146. licent, etc.: the sentiment debit pueros iam noua nupta tuos. intimated concerning the license--miser ah miser: cf. 63. 61. allowed by society to an unmarried 141. The verses are now directed man is true to ancient life. to the bridegroom.--male: modi-151. The chorus now turns to the fying abstinere, with the meaning bride with equally, though less bru of aegre, as in Verg. Geor. I. 360 tally, plain words. En tibi domus ut potens Et beata uiri tui: Quae tibi sine seruiat (O Hymen...

"Sinopsis" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

From the Back Cover:

Catullus, of Verona, went early to Rome, where he associated not only with other literary men form Cisalpine Gaul but also with Cicero and Hortensius. Tibullus, of equestrian rank and a friend of Horace, enjoyed the patronage of Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus, whom he several times apostrophizes. The Pervigilium Veneris, a poem of not quite a hundred lines celebrating a spring festival in honor of the goddess of love, is remarkable both for its romanticism which transformed classical into medieval literature.

About the Author:

Douglas F.S. Thomson is Professor Emeritus of Classics, University of Toronto.

"Sobre este título" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

(Ningún ejemplar disponible)

Buscar:



Crear una petición

Si conoce el autor y el título del libro pero no lo encuentra en IberLibro, nosotros podemos buscarlo por usted e informarle por e-mail en cuanto el libro esté disponible en nuestras páginas web.

Crear una petición