Principles of english etymology

 
9781235968426: Principles of english etymology
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 Excerpt: ...rise to lj (lj), written lg, lgi; so that L. delicatum became O. F. delgi/, delicate. So also Low Lat. bulicare, frequentative of L. bullire, to boil, became O. F. bolgier (Prov. bolegar, to stir oneself), F. bouger, Tudor E. bouge, v., to stir, E. budge. Final-icla became-ille in the case of L. lenticulam, F. L. lentie'la, F. lentille; whence M. E. and E. lentil. § 161. History of W. The Latin u (consonant) was still pronounced like the E. w for some time after the Christian era; a fact which is still commemorated in English in the pronunciation of the words wall, wine, and wick, from L. uallum, uinum, and ulcus; vol. i. § 398, p. 433. In French, its development, initially and medially, was not always the same; and the cases may be considered separately. Initially. Initial L. u became v in all but a few cases; as in L. uilem, F. vil, E. vile. Nearly every word in English 1 The / is due to excrescent d after ly1 (see above); thus we get fily's, fily'ds, filts,fih (=filts),fiz (=fits),fitz. that begins with v is of F. or late Latin origin, as may be seen by reference to my Dictionary. There are four exceptions in which v answers to A. S. f, viz. in the words vane, vat, vinewed, and vixen: see vol. i., § 349, p. 373. There are also two Scandian words, valhalla, viking; a few Italian words (in which v also answers to L. u), as velvet, vermicelli, volcano; the Portuguese verandah; the Servian vampire; the Russian verst; the Greek vial; the Eastern words Veda, van (for caravan), vizier; the Celtic vassal, varlet, valet, all in F. forms; and a few words of Teutonic origin, as vandal, vogue. But the whole number of such exceptions is by no means large, and the preponderance, among English words beginning with v, of words of French and Latin origin, ...

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Skeat, Rev. Walker W.
Editorial: RareBooksClub
ISBN 10: 1235968421 ISBN 13: 9781235968426
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Descripción RareBooksClub. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 174 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.4in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 Excerpt: . . . rise to lj (lj), written lg, lgi; so that L. delicatum became O. F. delgi, delicate. So also Low Lat. bulicare, frequentative of L. bullire, to boil, became O. F. bolgier (Prov. bolegar, to stir oneself), F. bouger, Tudor E. bouge, v. , to stir, E. budge. Final-icla became-ille in the case of L. lenticulam, F. L. lentiela, F. lentille; whence M. E. and E. lentil. 161. History of W. The Latin u (consonant) was still pronounced like the E. w for some time after the Christian era; a fact which is still commemorated in English in the pronunciation of the words wall, wine, and wick, from L. uallum, uinum, and ulcus; vol. i. 398, p. 433. In French, its development, initially and medially, was not always the same; and the cases may be considered separately. Initially. Initial L. u became v in all but a few cases; as in L. uilem, F. vil, E. vile. Nearly every word in English 1 The is due to excrescent d after ly1 (see above); thus we get filys, filyds, filts, fih (filts), fiz (fits), fitz. that begins with v is of F. or late Latin origin, as may be seen by reference to my Dictionary. There are four exceptions in which v answers to A. S. f, viz. in the words vane, vat, vinewed, and vixen: see vol. i. , 349, p. 373. There are also two Scandian words, valhalla, viking; a few Italian words (in which v also answers to L. u), as velvet, vermicelli, volcano; the Portuguese verandah; the Servian vampire; the Russian verst; the Greek vial; the Eastern words Veda, van (for caravan), vizier; the Celtic vassal, varlet, valet, all in F. forms; and a few words of Teutonic origin, as vandal, vogue. But the whole number of such exceptions is by no means large, and the preponderance, among English words beginning with v, of words of French and Latin origin, . . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Nº de ref. de la librería 9781235968426

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Skeat, Rev. Walker W.
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ISBN 10: 1235968421 ISBN 13: 9781235968426
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Descripción Rarebooksclub.com, United States, 2012. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. 246 x 189 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 Excerpt: .rise to lj (lj), written lg, lgi; so that L. delicatum became O. F. delgi/, delicate. So also Low Lat. bulicare, frequentative of L. bullire, to boil, became O. F. bolgier (Prov. bolegar, to stir oneself), F. bouger, Tudor E. bouge, v., to stir, E. budge. Final-icla became-ille in the case of L. lenticulam, F. L. lentie la, F. lentille; whence M. E. and E. lentil. 161. History of W. The Latin u (consonant) was still pronounced like the E. w for some time after the Christian era; a fact which is still commemorated in English in the pronunciation of the words wall, wine, and wick, from L. uallum, uinum, and ulcus; vol. i. 398, p. 433. In French, its development, initially and medially, was not always the same; and the cases may be considered separately. Initially. Initial L. u became v in all but a few cases; as in L. uilem, F. vil, E. vile. Nearly every word in English 1 The / is due to excrescent d after ly1 (see above); thus we get fily s, fily ds, filts, fih (=filts), fiz (=fits), fitz. that begins with v is of F. or late Latin origin, as may be seen by reference to my Dictionary. There are four exceptions in which v answers to A. S. f, viz. in the words vane, vat, vinewed, and vixen: see vol. i., 349, p. 373. There are also two Scandian words, valhalla, viking; a few Italian words (in which v also answers to L. u), as velvet, vermicelli, volcano; the Portuguese verandah; the Servian vampire; the Russian verst; the Greek vial; the Eastern words Veda, van (for caravan), vizier; the Celtic vassal, varlet, valet, all in F. forms; and a few words of Teutonic origin, as vandal, vogue. But the whole number of such exceptions is by no means large, and the preponderance, among English words beginning with v, of words of French and Latin origin, . Nº de ref. de la librería APC9781235968426

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3.

Skeat, Rev. Walker W.
Editorial: Rarebooksclub.com, United States (2012)
ISBN 10: 1235968421 ISBN 13: 9781235968426
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 10
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Descripción Rarebooksclub.com, United States, 2012. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. 246 x 189 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 Excerpt: .rise to lj (lj), written lg, lgi; so that L. delicatum became O. F. delgi/, delicate. So also Low Lat. bulicare, frequentative of L. bullire, to boil, became O. F. bolgier (Prov. bolegar, to stir oneself), F. bouger, Tudor E. bouge, v., to stir, E. budge. Final-icla became-ille in the case of L. lenticulam, F. L. lentie la, F. lentille; whence M. E. and E. lentil. 161. History of W. The Latin u (consonant) was still pronounced like the E. w for some time after the Christian era; a fact which is still commemorated in English in the pronunciation of the words wall, wine, and wick, from L. uallum, uinum, and ulcus; vol. i. 398, p. 433. In French, its development, initially and medially, was not always the same; and the cases may be considered separately. Initially. Initial L. u became v in all but a few cases; as in L. uilem, F. vil, E. vile. Nearly every word in English 1 The / is due to excrescent d after ly1 (see above); thus we get fily s, fily ds, filts, fih (=filts), fiz (=fits), fitz. that begins with v is of F. or late Latin origin, as may be seen by reference to my Dictionary. There are four exceptions in which v answers to A. S. f, viz. in the words vane, vat, vinewed, and vixen: see vol. i., 349, p. 373. There are also two Scandian words, valhalla, viking; a few Italian words (in which v also answers to L. u), as velvet, vermicelli, volcano; the Portuguese verandah; the Servian vampire; the Russian verst; the Greek vial; the Eastern words Veda, van (for caravan), vizier; the Celtic vassal, varlet, valet, all in F. forms; and a few words of Teutonic origin, as vandal, vogue. But the whole number of such exceptions is by no means large, and the preponderance, among English words beginning with v, of words of French and Latin origin, . Nº de ref. de la librería APC9781235968426

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