Ethnology of the Indo-Pacific islands

 
9781235926204: Ethnology of the Indo-Pacific islands
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 Excerpt: ...other adjacent W. Indonesian languages have only_4_to 6. The uncultivated languages of Sumatra like those of the Peninsula use the formatives much less frequently than the Malay, but they have all been deeply influenced by that language, while they have also derived much from a common source, for it must be borne in mind that both of these causes have operated in producing the great amount of affinity which now prevails. All the phonologies have much in common, the Malay itself departing less from the primitive W. Indonesian character than it has done as a Peninsular language. The most northern Sumatran language, that of the Orang Ache, has some peculiarities. The Battan dialects are tinged with the eastern character of the adjacent Niasi. The dialects to the south of the Malay are closely allied in phonology to the Sundan, S. Peninsular and W. Borneon. Before proceeding to the proper Sumatran languages I will notice tho«e of the western chain of islands. The Muruwi language, which is spoken by the natives of the Baniak and Si Main islands, is said by Marsden to have much r tdical affinity to the Batta and Nias and less to the Pagai. From his list of 24 words and the numerals it awtars to be vocalic with a small proportion of consonantal terminals. The sounds of the language of Pulo Nias and P. Baiu are in general pure and clear, but like most E. Indonesian phonologies it is softly aspirate. V,f and w occur frequently, and ch and j are common, ch sometimes representing t and h of Battan and Malay, (e. g. chunu, Bat. tungi Mai. tunu; buchi, B. bahi; chuka, M. tuka; fichu, Bat. pitu; bachu, B. M. batu.) The aspirate tendency occasionally leads to a preference of h to h, ae in ono of X thene examples. Although the pure a, i and u are preferred, broad o an...

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Logan, James Richardson
Editorial: RareBooksClub
ISBN 10: 1235926206 ISBN 13: 9781235926204
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 20
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Descripción RareBooksClub. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. This item is printed on demand. Paperback. 44 pages. Dimensions: 9.7in. x 7.4in. x 0.1in.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 Excerpt: . . . other adjacent W. Indonesian languages have only4to 6. The uncultivated languages of Sumatra like those of the Peninsula use the formatives much less frequently than the Malay, but they have all been deeply influenced by that language, while they have also derived much from a common source, for it must be borne in mind that both of these causes have operated in producing the great amount of affinity which now prevails. All the phonologies have much in common, the Malay itself departing less from the primitive W. Indonesian character than it has done as a Peninsular language. The most northern Sumatran language, that of the Orang Ache, has some peculiarities. The Battan dialects are tinged with the eastern character of the adjacent Niasi. The dialects to the south of the Malay are closely allied in phonology to the Sundan, S. Peninsular and W. Borneon. Before proceeding to the proper Sumatran languages I will notice thoe of the western chain of islands. The Muruwi language, which is spoken by the natives of the Baniak and Si Main islands, is said by Marsden to have much r tdical affinity to the Batta and Nias and less to the Pagai. From his list of 24 words and the numerals it awtars to be vocalic with a small proportion of consonantal terminals. The sounds of the language of Pulo Nias and P. Baiu are in general pure and clear, but like most E. Indonesian phonologies it is softly aspirate. V, f and w occur frequently, and ch and j are common, ch sometimes representing t and h of Battan and Malay, (e. g. chunu, Bat. tungi Mai. tunu; buchi, B. bahi; chuka, M. tuka; fichu, Bat. pitu; bachu, B. M. batu. ) The aspirate tendency occasionally leads to a preference of h to h, ae in ono of X thene examples. Although the pure a, i and u are preferred, broad o an. . . This item ships from La Vergne,TN. Paperback. Nº de ref. de la librería 9781235926204

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2.

Logan, James Richardson
Editorial: Rarebooksclub.com, United States (2012)
ISBN 10: 1235926206 ISBN 13: 9781235926204
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 10
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Descripción Rarebooksclub.com, United States, 2012. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. 246 x 189 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****. This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 Excerpt: .other adjacent W. Indonesian languages have only 4 to 6. The uncultivated languages of Sumatra like those of the Peninsula use the formatives much less frequently than the Malay, but they have all been deeply influenced by that language, while they have also derived much from a common source, for it must be borne in mind that both of these causes have operated in producing the great amount of affinity which now prevails. All the phonologies have much in common, the Malay itself departing less from the primitive W. Indonesian character than it has done as a Peninsular language. The most northern Sumatran language, that of the Orang Ache, has some peculiarities. The Battan dialects are tinged with the eastern character of the adjacent Niasi. The dialects to the south of the Malay are closely allied in phonology to the Sundan, S. Peninsular and W. Borneon. Before proceeding to the proper Sumatran languages I will notice tho-e of the western chain of islands. The Muruwi language, which is spoken by the natives of the Baniak and Si Main islands, is said by Marsden to have much r tdical affinity to the Batta and Nias and less to the Pagai. From his list of 24 words and the numerals it awtars to be vocalic with a small proportion of consonantal terminals. The sounds of the language of Pulo Nias and P. Baiu are in general pure and clear, but like most E. Indonesian phonologies it is softly aspirate. V, f and w occur frequently, and ch and j are common, ch sometimes representing t and h of Battan and Malay, (e. g. chunu, Bat. tungi Mai. tunu; buchi, B. bahi; chuka, M. tuka; fichu, Bat. pitu; bachu, B. M. batu.) The aspirate tendency occasionally leads to a preference of h to h, ae in ono of X thene examples. Although the pure a, i and u are preferred, broad o an. Nº de ref. de la librería APC9781235926204

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3.

Logan, James Richardson
Editorial: Rarebooksclub.com, United States (2012)
ISBN 10: 1235926206 ISBN 13: 9781235926204
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 10
Impresión bajo demanda
Librería
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Descripción Rarebooksclub.com, United States, 2012. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. 246 x 189 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book ***** Print on Demand *****.This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1851 Excerpt: .other adjacent W. Indonesian languages have only 4 to 6. The uncultivated languages of Sumatra like those of the Peninsula use the formatives much less frequently than the Malay, but they have all been deeply influenced by that language, while they have also derived much from a common source, for it must be borne in mind that both of these causes have operated in producing the great amount of affinity which now prevails. All the phonologies have much in common, the Malay itself departing less from the primitive W. Indonesian character than it has done as a Peninsular language. The most northern Sumatran language, that of the Orang Ache, has some peculiarities. The Battan dialects are tinged with the eastern character of the adjacent Niasi. The dialects to the south of the Malay are closely allied in phonology to the Sundan, S. Peninsular and W. Borneon. Before proceeding to the proper Sumatran languages I will notice tho-e of the western chain of islands. The Muruwi language, which is spoken by the natives of the Baniak and Si Main islands, is said by Marsden to have much r tdical affinity to the Batta and Nias and less to the Pagai. From his list of 24 words and the numerals it awtars to be vocalic with a small proportion of consonantal terminals. The sounds of the language of Pulo Nias and P. Baiu are in general pure and clear, but like most E. Indonesian phonologies it is softly aspirate. V, f and w occur frequently, and ch and j are common, ch sometimes representing t and h of Battan and Malay, (e. g. chunu, Bat. tungi Mai. tunu; buchi, B. bahi; chuka, M. tuka; fichu, Bat. pitu; bachu, B. M. batu.) The aspirate tendency occasionally leads to a preference of h to h, ae in ono of X thene examples. Although the pure a, i and u are preferred, broad o an. Nº de ref. de la librería APC9781235926204

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