Elves: Elf, Alberich, Huldufólk, Changeling, Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight, Christmas elf, Moss people, Icelandic Elf School, Haltija

 
9781156453834: Elves: Elf, Alberich, Huldufólk, Changeling, Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight, Christmas elf, Moss people, Icelandic Elf School, Haltija
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 27. Chapters: Elf, Alberich, Huldufólk, Changeling, Lady Isabel and the Elf Knight, Christmas elf, Moss people, Icelandic Elf School, Haltija, Álfablót, Cauld Lad of Hylton, The Elfin Knight, Queen of Elphame, Weisse Frauen, Svartálfar and Svartálfaheimr, Dökkálfar and Ljósálfar, Half-elf, The Elf Maiden, The Queen of Elfan's Nourice, Thrummy-cap, Troll elf. Excerpt: Huldufólk (Icelandic hidden people from huldu- "pertaining to secrecy" and fólk "people", "folk") are elves in Icelandic folklore. Building projects in Iceland are sometimes altered to prevent damaging the rocks where they are believed to live. According to these Icelandic folk beliefs, one should never throw stones because of the possibility of hitting the huldufólk. In 1982, 150 Icelanders went to the NATO base in Keflavík to look for "elves who might be endangered by American Phantom jets and AWACS reconnaissance planes." In 2004, Alcoa had to have a government expert certify that their chosen building site was free of archaeological sites, including ones related to huldufólk folklore, before they could build an aluminum smelter in Iceland. In 2011, elves/huldufólk were believed by some to be responsible for an incident in Bolungarvík where rocks rained down on residential streets. Icelandic gardens often feature tiny wooden álfhól (elf houses) for elves/hidden people to live in. Some Icelanders have also built tiny churches to convert elves to Christianity. President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson has explained the existence of huldufólk tales by saying: "Icelanders are few in number, so in the old times we doubled our population with tales of elves and fairies." Hidden people often appear in the significant or prophetic dreams of Icelanders. They are usually described as wearing 19th-century Icelandic clothing, and are often described as wearing green. They are also a p...

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