Byzantine navy: Megas doux, Karabisianoi, Cibyrrhaeot Theme, Droungarios, Aegean Sea, Gasmouloi, Samos, Mardaites, Chelandion, Leo of Tripoli

 
9781156415306: Byzantine navy: Megas doux, Karabisianoi, Cibyrrhaeot Theme, Droungarios, Aegean Sea, Gasmouloi, Samos, Mardaites, Chelandion, Leo of Tripoli
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 25. Chapters: Megas doux, Karabisianoi, Cibyrrhaeot Theme, Droungarios, Aegean Sea, Gasmouloi, Samos, Mardaites, Chelandion, Leo of Tripoli, Dromon. Excerpt: The Byzantine navy was the naval force of what historians call the Byzantine Empire, and contemporaries called the Roman Empire or the Eastern Roman Empire. Like the empire it served, it was a direct continuation from its imperial Roman predecessor, but played a far greater role in the defense and survival of the state then its earlier iterations. While the fleets of the unified Roman Empire faced few great naval threats, operating as a policing force vastly inferior in power and prestige to the legions, the sea became vital to the very existence of the empire in the east, which several historians have called a "maritime empire". The first threat to Roman hegemony in the Mediterranean was posed by the Vandals in the 5th century, but their threat was ended by the wars of Justinian I in the 6th century. The re-establishment of a permanently maintained fleet and the introduction of the dromon galley in the same period also marks the point when the Byzantine navy began departing from its late Roman roots and developing its own characteristic identity. This process would be furthered with the onset of the Muslim conquests in the 7th century. Following the loss of the Levant and later Africa, the Mediterranean Sea was transformed from a "Roman lake" into a battleground between Byzantines and Arabs. In this struggle, the Byzantine fleets were critical, not only for the defense of the Empire's far-flung possessions around the Mediterranean basin, but also in the repulsion of seaborne attacks against the imperial capital of Constantinople itself. Through the use of the newly invented "Greek fire", the Byzantine navy's best-known and feared secret weapon, Constantinople was saved from...

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