Air-To-Air Missiles of the Soviet Union: Cold War Air-To-Air Missiles of the Soviet Union, List of NATO Reporting Names for Air-To-Air Missiles, R-77,

 
9781156066126: Air-To-Air Missiles of the Soviet Union: Cold War Air-To-Air Missiles of the Soviet Union, List of NATO Reporting Names for Air-To-Air Missiles, R-77,
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 66. Chapters: Cold War air-to-air missiles of the Soviet Union, List of NATO reporting names for air-to-air missiles, R-77, R-60, R-27, K-13, R-23, R-33, R-73, R-37, R-40, K-8, K-5, K-9. Excerpt: The Russian R-77 (RVV-AE) Missile (NATO reporting name: AA-12 Adder) is a medium range, air-to-air, active radar-guided missile system. It is the Russian counterpart to the American AIM-120 AMRAAM missile, thus gaining a nickname: Amraamski. Work on the R-77 began in 1982. It represented Russia's first multi-purpose missile for both tactical and strategic aircraft for fire-and-forget use against a range of aircraft from hovering helicopters to high speed, low altitude aircraft. Gennadiy Sokolovski, general designer of the Vympel Design Bureau, said that the R-77 missile can be used against medium and long range air-to-air missiles such as the AIM-120 AMRAAM and AIM-54 Phoenix, as well as SAMs such as the Patriot. It can be used against cruise missiles and precision-guided munitions (PGMs). First seen in 1992 at the MosAeroshow '92, the R-77RVV-AE was immediately nicknamed Amraamski by Western journalists. The Russian-language version of the acronym for the weapon is RVV-AE and it is also known as the Izdieliye-170. The R-77 can be used by most of the Russian Air force fighter aircraft. Since many of their aircraft, primarily MiG-29, Su-27 and MiG-31, were upgraded recently. The same is true for the PLAAF of China, who use the Su-27 as well as a copy, the J-11. The newer Su-30MKK has a N001 (Su-27 radar) with a digital bypass channel incorporating a mode allowing it to use R-77s. Newer Russian aircraft from the MiG-29S (N019M radar) onward are not restricted in this regard. There are other variants under development. One has an uprated motor to boost range at high altitudes to as much as 120-160 km; it is known as the R-77RVV-AE-PD. The...

From the Publisher:

Chapters: Soviet Cold War Air-To-Air Missiles, List of Nato Reporting Names for Air-To-Air Missiles, Vympel R-77, Molniya R-60, Vympel K-13, Vympel R-33, Vympel R-23, Vympel R-27, Vympel R-73, Vympel R-37, Bisnovat R-40, Kaliningrad K-5, Kaliningrad K-8, Raduga K-9. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 66. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Bisnovat (later Molniya ) R-4 (NATO reporting name AA-5 'Ash' ) was an early Soviet long-range air-to-air missile , initially designated K-80 or R-80.History Development of the R-4 began in 1959, entering operational service in 1963. It was used primarily on the Tupolev Tu-128 interceptor, matched to the Tu-128's RP-S Smerch ('Tornado') radar , although some reports suggested the MiG-25 sometimes carried it as well.Like many Soviet weapons, it was made in both semi-active radar homing (R-4R ) and infrared-homing (R-4T ) versions. Standard Soviet doctrine was to fire the weapons in SARH/IR pairs to increase the odds of a hit. Target altitude was from 8 to 21 km, the missile could be fired from an aircraft flying 8 km below target.In 1973 the weapon was modernized to R-4MR (SARH) / MT (IR) standard, with lower minimal target altitude (0.5-1 km), improved seeker performance and compatibility with the upgraded RP-SM Smerch radar.R-4T (inner pair) and R-4R (outer pair) missiles under wings of Tupolev Tu-128 prototypeThe R-4 survived in limited service through at least the late 1980s, retiring along with the last Tu-128 aircraft after the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union .Operators Soviet Union Specifications (R-4T / R-4R) Websites (URLs online) A hyperlinked version of this chapter is at Bisnovat R-40 The Bisnovat (later Molniya then Vympel ) R-40 (NATO reporting name AA-6 'Acrid' ) was a long-range air-to-air missile developed in the 1960s by the Soviet Union fo...

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