18th-Century Antiquarians: Andrew Ducarel, Benjamin Bartlett, Benjamin Forster (Antiquary), Daines Barrington, David Erskine (Dramatist), Edward

 
9781156016619: 18th-Century Antiquarians: Andrew Ducarel, Benjamin Bartlett, Benjamin Forster (Antiquary), Daines Barrington, David Erskine (Dramatist), Edward
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 27. Chapters: Andrew Ducarel, Benjamin Bartlett, Benjamin Forster (antiquary), Daines Barrington, David Erskine (dramatist), Edward Duke (antiquary), Edward Forster the Elder, Edward Hasted, Evan Evans (poet), Francis Blomefield, George Evans (antiquary), Henry Chauncy, Henry Thomas Ellacombe, James Bentham, James Ellis (antiquary), James Ford (antiquary), John Bacon (clerk), John Battely, John Burton (antiquary), John Duncumb, John Edwin Cussans, John Elliot (antiquary), John Nichols (printer), Matthew Gregson, Michael Lort, Miles Gale, Peter Whalley (clergyman), Richard Gough (antiquarian), Richard Greene (antiquary), Richard Polwhele, Robert Atkyns (topographer), Roger Gale (antiquary), Samuel Gale, Sir Richard Hoare, 2nd Baronet, Smart Lethieullier, Theophilus Jones, William Bawdwen, William Jones (Welsh radical). Excerpt: William Jones (christened 18 June 1726 - died 20 August 1795) was a Welsh antiquary, poet, scholar and radical. Jones was an ardent supporter of both the American and French Revolutions, and through his strong support of the Jacobin cause he became known as 'the rural Voltaire' or 'Welsh Voltaire'. Despite his support for revolutionary causes, he never advocated an uprising within his own country, he instead led a campaign to encourage his countrymen to emigrate to the United States. Jones held strong anti-English feelings, which led to one contemporary to describe him as "the hottest arsed" Welshman he had ever known. Jones was born in 1726 to William Sion Dafydd and his second wife Catherine. His father was a guard on the coach that ran between Machynlleth in Wales and Shrewsbury in England, though he also farmed at 'Dol Hywel' in Llangadfan in Montgomeryshire. Jones, despite his later preaching of the glory of emigration, lived his whole life at Llangadfan. He was christened at Llangadfan parish church on 18 June 1726, and the only formal education he received was at one of Griffith Jones' schools that existed for a time in the neighbourhood. He was mainly self-educated, and being raised as a Welsh speaker, he learnt English as a second language. His written English was said to be good, though he spoke it with difficulty. He also learnt Latin, and translated works by Horace and Ovid into Welsh. As well as the classics, Jones promoted the ideas of the French philosopher Voltaire in Welsh; and in the view of David Barnes in his book The Companion Guide to Wales this 'succeeded in influencing the political development of his country'. He was married to Ann, and they had a son and two daughters. His wife suffered terribly from pains of the body and was confined to bed for the last 15 years of her life. Jones began to correspond with the Gwyneddigion Society, and with other contemporary men of letters, and began collecting and recording local folk songs and country da

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