Jewish Athletes (Track and Field): Abel Kiviat, Aleksandr Averbukh, Amitzur Shapira, Andy Bloom, Bobbie Rosenfeld, Danielle Frenkel, Daniel Frank, Dee

 
9781156009000: Jewish Athletes (Track and Field): Abel Kiviat, Aleksandr Averbukh, Amitzur Shapira, Andy Bloom, Bobbie Rosenfeld, Danielle Frenkel, Daniel Frank, Dee
From the Publisher:

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 27. Chapters: Abel Kiviat, Aleksandr Averbukh, Amitzur Shapira, Andy Bloom, Bobbie Rosenfeld, Danielle Frenkel, Daniel Frank, Deena Kastor, Edward Smouha, Elias Katz, Esther Roth-Shahamorov, Faina Melnyk, Gary Gubner, Gerry Ashworth, Gretel Bergmann, Harold Abrahams, Henry Laskau, Hugo Friend, Irena Szewi?ska, Irina Press, Itai Maggidi, James Espir, Janet Kohan-Sedq, Jillian Schwartz, Jo Ankier, Lillian Copeland, Lon Myers, Louis Clarke, Maria Leontyavna Itkina, Milton Green, Myer Prinstein, Mykola Avilov, Reuven Helman, Seteng Ayele, Sidney Abrahams, Steven Solomon, Svetlana Krachevskaya, Tamara Press, Tommy Kafri, Vera Krepkina, Zhanna Pintusevich-Block. Excerpt: Harold Maurice Abrahams, CBE, (15 December 1899 - 14 January 1978) was a British athlete of Jewish origin. He was Olympic champion in 1924 in the 100 metres sprint, a feat depicted in the 1981 movie Chariots of Fire. Abrahams's father Isaac had emigrated to England from Russian Poland. He worked as a financier and settled in Bedford with his Welsh wife Ester. Harold was born in Bedford, and was the younger brother of another British athlete, the Olympic long jumper Sir Sidney Abrahams. Another brother, Sir Adolphe Abrahams, became the founder of British sport medicine. Abrahams was educated at Bedford School, Repton School and then at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, from 1920 to 1924. He then trained as a lawyer. At Cambridge, he was a member of the Cambridge University Athletics Club (of which he was president 1922-1923), Cambridge University Liberal Club the Pitt Club, and the Gilbert and Sullivan Society. Before going to Cambridge he served as a lieutenant in the British Army. A sprinter and long jumper since his youth, he continued to compete in sport while at Cambridge. He earned a place in the 1920 Olympic team, but was eliminated in the quarter-finals of both the 100 m and 200 m, and finished 20th in the long jump. He was also part of the British relay team that took fourth place in the 4 x 100 m. Although Abrahams dominated British long jump and sprint events, after graduating from Cambridge he employed Sam Mussabini, a professional coach, who improved his style and training techniques in preparation for the 1924 Olympics in Paris, France. For six months, Mussabini at Abrahams's direction emphasized the 100 m, with the 200 m as secondary. Through vigorous training, Abrahams perfected his start, stride, and form. One month before the 1924 Games, he set the English record in the long jump 24 feet inches (7.38 m), a record which stood for the next 32 years. The same day he ran the 100 yard dash in 9.6 seconds, but the time was not submitted as a record b

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