The Residents Albums: Meet the Residents, the Tunes of Two Cities, Mark of the Mole, Not Available, Duck Stab|buster & Glen

 
9781155589688: The Residents Albums: Meet the Residents, the Tunes of Two Cities, Mark of the Mole, Not Available, Duck Stab|buster & Glen
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Commentary (music and lyrics not included). Pages: 152. Not illustrated. Chapters: Meet the Residents, the Tunes of Two Cities, Mark of the Mole, Not Available, Duck Stab/buster & Glen, Intermission: Extraneous Music From the Residents' Mole Show, (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction, the Third Reich 'n Roll, Animal Lover, Demons Dance Alone, Commercial Album, God in Three Persons, Eskimo, Wormwood: Curious Stories From the Bible, the 13th Anniversary Show Live in the U.s.a., Fingerprince, the Big Bubble: Part Four of the Mole Trilogy, the Thirteenth Anniversary Show, Freak Show/freak Show Soundtrack, Whatever Happened to Vileness Fats?, River of Crime, the King & Eye, Stars & Hank Forever: the American Composers Series, Tweedles, Title in Limbo, George & James, Residue of the Residents, Roadworms: the Berlin Sessions, Icky Flix, Cube E: Live in Holland, Gingerbread Man, the Residents Radio Special, Wb: Rmx, Babyfingers, Assorted Secrets, Refused, the Mole Show Live in Holland, Our Finest Flowers, 12 Days of Brumalia, Duck Stab!, Census Taker, Have a Bad Day, Buckaroo Blues, I Murdered Mommy, the Commercial Single, Buckaroo Blues & Black Barry, Dot Com, Prelude to "The Teds", I Hate Heaven, Hunters, Santa Dog 88, Snakey Wake. Excerpt: "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" is a song by English rock band The Rolling Stones released in 1965. It was written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards and produced by Andrew Loog Oldham. The number is noted for Richards's three-note guitar riff which opens and drives the song, and for the lyrics, which include references to sexual intercourse and a theme of anti-commercialism. The latter in particular caused the song to be "perceived as an attack on the status quo". The song was first released as a single in the United States in June 1965 and also featured on the American version of Out of Our Heads, released that ...

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