The Weather Experiment: The Pioneers who Sought to see the Future

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9780701187996: The Weather Experiment: The Pioneers who Sought to see the Future
From the Publisher:

In 1865 a broken Admiral Robert FitzRoy locked himself in his dressing room and cut his throat. His grand meteorological project had failed. Yet only a decade later, FitzRoy’s storm warning system and ‘forecasts’ would return, the model for what we use today.

In an age when a storm at sea was evidence of God’s great wrath, nineteenth-century meteorologists had to fight against convention and religious dogma. But buoyed by the achievements of the Enlightenment a generation of mavericks set out to explain the secrets of the atmosphere and learned to predict the future. Among them were Luke Howard, the first to classify the clouds, Francis Beaufort who quantified the winds, James Glaisher, who explored the upper atmosphere in a hot-air balloon, Samuel Morse whose electric telegraph gave scientists the means by which to transmit weather warnings, and FitzRoy himself, master sailor, scientific pioneer and founder of the MET Office.

Reputations were built and shattered. Fractious debates raged over decades between scientists from London to Galway, Paris to New York. Explaining the atmosphere was one thing, but predicting what it was going to do seemed a step too far. In 1854, when a politician suggested to the Commons that Londoners might soon know the weather twenty-four hours in advance, the House roared with laughter.

Peter Moore’s exhilarating account navigates treacherous seas, rough winds and uncovers the obsession that drove these men to great invention and greater understanding.

About the Author:

Peter Moore is a writer, freelance journalist and lecturer. Born in Staffordshire in 1983, he studied history and sociology at Durham University and then spent six years working in the media in Madrid and London, where he was head of publishing at an award-winning digital agency. He teaches creative non-fiction at City University and lives in London. His first book, Damn His Blood, an acclaimed vivid history of a gruesome rural murder in 1806, was published in 2012. www.peter-moore.co.uk. @petermoore.

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Moore, Peter
Editorial: Vintage Publishing, United Kingdom (2015)
ISBN 10: 0701187999 ISBN 13: 9780701187996
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 1
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The Book Depository US
(London, Reino Unido)
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Descripción Vintage Publishing, United Kingdom, 2015. Hardback. Estado de conservación: New. 240 x 162 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. This is the Book of the Week on Radio 4. Gripping. (The Times). Exhilarating. (Sunday Times). In 1865 a broken Admiral Robert FitzRoy locked himself in his dressing room and cut his throat. His grand meteorological project had failed. Yet only a decade later, FitzRoy s storm-warning system and forecasts would return, the model for what we use today. In an age when a storm at sea was evidence of God s great wrath, nineteenth-century meteorologists had to fight against convention and religious dogma. But buoyed by the achievements of the Enlightenment a generation of mavericks set out to explain the secrets of the atmosphere and learned to predict the future. Among them were Luke Howard, the first to classify the clouds, Francis Beaufort who quantified the winds, James Glaisher, who explored the upper atmosphere in a hot-air balloon, Samuel Morse whose electric telegraph gave scientists the means by which to transmit weather warnings, and FitzRoy himself, master sailor, scientific pioneer and founder of the Met Office. Reputations were built and shattered. Fractious debates raged over decades between scientists from London to Galway, Paris to New York. Explaining the atmosphere was one thing, but predicting what it was going to do seemed a step too far. In 1854, when a politician suggested to the Commons that Londoners might soon know the weather twenty-four hours in advance, the House roared with laughter. Peter Moore s exhilarating account navigates treacherous seas, rough winds and uncovers the obsession that drove these men to great invention and greater understanding. Nº de ref. de la librería AAW9780701187996

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Moore, Peter
Editorial: Chatto & Windus (2015)
ISBN 10: 0701187999 ISBN 13: 9780701187996
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 1
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Irish Booksellers
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Descripción Chatto & Windus, 2015. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. book. Nº de ref. de la librería 0701187999

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3.

Moore, Peter
Editorial: Vintage Publishing, United Kingdom (2015)
ISBN 10: 0701187999 ISBN 13: 9780701187996
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 1
Librería
The Book Depository
(London, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Vintage Publishing, United Kingdom, 2015. Hardback. Estado de conservación: New. 240 x 162 mm. Language: English . Brand New Book. This is the Book of the Week on Radio 4. Gripping. (The Times). Exhilarating. (Sunday Times). In 1865 a broken Admiral Robert FitzRoy locked himself in his dressing room and cut his throat. His grand meteorological project had failed. Yet only a decade later, FitzRoy s storm-warning system and forecasts would return, the model for what we use today. In an age when a storm at sea was evidence of God s great wrath, nineteenth-century meteorologists had to fight against convention and religious dogma. But buoyed by the achievements of the Enlightenment a generation of mavericks set out to explain the secrets of the atmosphere and learned to predict the future. Among them were Luke Howard, the first to classify the clouds, Francis Beaufort who quantified the winds, James Glaisher, who explored the upper atmosphere in a hot-air balloon, Samuel Morse whose electric telegraph gave scientists the means by which to transmit weather warnings, and FitzRoy himself, master sailor, scientific pioneer and founder of the Met Office. Reputations were built and shattered. Fractious debates raged over decades between scientists from London to Galway, Paris to New York. Explaining the atmosphere was one thing, but predicting what it was going to do seemed a step too far. In 1854, when a politician suggested to the Commons that Londoners might soon know the weather twenty-four hours in advance, the House roared with laughter. Peter Moore s exhilarating account navigates treacherous seas, rough winds and uncovers the obsession that drove these men to great invention and greater understanding. Nº de ref. de la librería AAW9780701187996

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