15.17 Chinelo Okparanta Happiness, Like Water

ISBN 13: 9780544003453

Happiness, Like Water

4 valoración promedio
( 695 valoraciones por Goodreads )
 
9780544003453: Happiness, Like Water

"Astonishing. Okparanta’s narrators render their stories with such strength and intimacy, such lucidity and composure, that in each and every case the truths of their lives detonate deep inside the reader’s heart, with the power and force of revelation."—Paul Harding

Here are Nigerian women at home and transplanted to the United States, building lives out of longing and hope, faith and doubt, the struggle to stay and the mandate to leave, the burden and strength of love. Here are characters faced with dangerous decisions, children slick with oil from the river, a woman in love with another despite the penalties. Here is a world marked by electricity outages, lush landscapes, folktales, buses that break down and never start up again. Here is a portrait of Nigerians that is surprising, shocking, heartrending, loving, and across social strata, dealing in every kind of change. Here are stories filled with language to make your eyes pause and your throat catch. Happiness, Like Water introduces a true talent, a young writer with a beautiful heart and a capacious imagination.

"Intricate, graceful prose propels Okparanta’s profoundly moving and illuminating book. I devoured these stories and immediately wanted more. This is an arrival."—NoViolet Bulawayo

"Okparanta's prose is tender, beautiful and evocative. These powerful stories of contemporary Nigeria are told with compassion and a certain sense of humor. What a remarkable new talent."—Chika Unigwe

"A haunting and startlingly original collection of short stories about the lives of Nigerians both at home and in America. Happiness, Like Water is a deeply affecting literary debut, the work of a sure and gifted new writer."—Julie Otsuka

"Sinopsis" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

About the Author:

Chinelo Okparanta was born in Port-Harcourt, Nigeria. A Colgate University Olive B. O'Connor Fellow in Fiction as well as a recipient of the University of Iowa's Provost's Postgraduate Fellowship in Fiction, Okparanta received her BS from The Pennsylvania State University, her MA from Rutgers University, and her MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. She was one of Granta's six New Voices for 2012 and her stories have appeared in Granta, Tin House, The Kenyon Review, and elsewhere. Her story "America" was short-listed for the Caine Prize in African Writing.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

On Ohaeto Street   At the time of the robbery, Eze and Chinwe were living in the town of Elelenwo in Port Harcourt. They lived in Maewood Estates, which some of the neighbours called Ehoro’s Estate, because Ehoro was the surname of the owner.
    Ehoro’s was a fairly large estate with about a dozen bungalows in it. The bungalows stood in clusters, separated only by gravel and grass, by the road connecting them, and by trees: orange trees, guava trees and plantain trees. There was a driveway in front of each bungalow, and each bungalow had a garage.
    A cement wall rose high along the perimeter of the estate, and with it, two oversized metal gates, one at the entrance, the other at the exit. The top of the cement wall (and the tops of the adjoining gates) were lined with shards of glass – green glass, and clear glass, and brown glass – the way walls and gates in Port Harcourt are still lined today.
Outside the estate, along the main road leading up to its entrance, were small shops whose owners sold Nabisco wafers and Ribena juices, tinned tomatoes and sardines in a can.
    In the evenings, vendors put up makeshift stands in the spaces between the shops. There, they sold roasted corn on the cob along with native pears, and roasted plantains sprinkled with palm oil, pepper and salt.
    There was a police station not too far down the road. Sometimes officers paraded back and forth in uniform. Sometimes it was hard to tell if they were real police officers or crooks in uniform – at least, so Chinwe tells me. But it must have been true, because even as far back as then, Port Harcourt was known for its crooks.   It was her mama who encouraged them to live there, in Ehoro’s estate. The same way she had encouraged Chinwe to marry Eze.
    Chinwe had been living with her then, on Ohaeto Street, in the D/Line area of Port Harcourt. They lived in a small flat with yellow walls, inside and out. Chinwe was a teacher those days, home economics in St Catherine’s secondary school, right there on Ohaeto Street.
    The first time Eze came to them, Chinwe had just returned from work at the school. She and her mama were sitting outside on the steps to the flat, and Chinwe was telling her mama how the students wore her out, with their not being able to follow simple instructions – the way they cut the wrong sewing patterns or mixed the wrong ingredients into something as easy as the crust of a meat pie. She was saying all this when Eze walked up to them, carrying a black briefcase and a couple of magazines in his hand.
    He smiled brightly and told them that his name was Eze. That he came offering the good news of God’s Kingdom. Would they please invite him to tell them more?
    At first Chinwe was quite annoyed by this – by the mere presence of Eze at their door, and by his request for an invitation. She frowned and shook her head, muttered to her mama to please send him away. But her mama saw some things in Eze that she liked: his crisply ironed trousers and shirt, his spotless shoes. His teeth were crooked, but in a way that her mama must have found endearing.
    Her mama stood up, wiped her hands on the wrapper that was tied around her waist, stretched out her hand and shook his hand. She invited him in.
    Chinwe thinks that he stayed for about an hour, but it’s hard for her to know exactly how long, because after fifteen minutes of his flipping through the pages of the Awake! magazine, and the pages of the Watchtower, and the pages of his Bible (the New World Translation), she excused herself. Assignments to grade, she said, and went to her room. She fell asleep there and did not wake up until her mama came knocking at her door, asking just how long she intended to stay in her room, scolding her for being so rude to the nice young man who came to bring the good news of God’s Kingdom to them.
    They burst out laughing then. Because, of course, the Jehovah’s Witnesses were always coming around in those days. And it was funny that they had actually invited one of them in.
    ‘Mama, you had no business wasting his time like that!’ Chinwe said.
    ‘I know, I know,’ her mama replied. And they both laughed some more.   He came back, a week or so later. They were again outside on the steps. There was the scent of beans boiling on the stove. Black-eyed peas. Even outside, in the open air, he could smell it, and he told them as much. He asked if they would eat it with soaked garri or with akamu. Chinwe frowned, because she suspected he would soon invite himself for dinner. Her mama smiled and did the inviting for him.
    Her papa had been a carpenter who made chairs and tables and shelves in Port Harcourt. Her mama had told her this. Chinwe had not yet been born at the time, so she had  not witnessed this for herself. In any case, he was a carpenter, then for some reason or the other, he decided to become a cobbler – he needed a change of scenery perhaps. Or, maybe carpentry was wearing him out. Whatever the case, he sold all his furniture and took down the wooden CARPENTER sign on the front of his shop. He painted over the sign, and announced the place a cobbler’s shop instead. He worked that way for some time – years, in fact – as a cobbler, until just before Chinwe was born.
    He decided he would become a grammar-school teacher then. He had no training, but he again cleared out his shop and painted over the old sign. He made himself some chairs and desks. He found a blackboard, some chalk. He walked around town announcing the school to all the people he met. A private school, he said, for the very brightest three- to eleven-year-olds. And if they were not bright to begin with, he said, his school would make them bright.
    It worked. People actually inquired. And afterwards, they actually began sending their children. Teaching was the job he stayed with until he died.
    Years later, when Chinwe was old enough to care, her mama would tell Chinwe how seriously he took his teaching job, how he would come home each day with stories about the children. She told Chinwe about the way he took care to iron his trousers and his shirt, to comb his hair and pat it down, things he’d never done with either of his former jobs.
    These teaching stories were mostly what her mama told Chinwe when she told the girl of her papa, and so, perhaps it was during his time working that grammar-school job that her mama loved her papa best.
    He died the year Chinwe turned four, so she could barely remember him, could barely remember that grammar-school- teacher persona of his. Or rather, she remembered all of it, but only as a result of her mother’s telling.   That evening with Eze standing out there, talking about beans and garri and akamu, her mama remarked on the way that Eze’s shirt and trousers were always so perfectly ironed. That was the way Chinwe’s papa’s shirt and trousers also used to be, she said, those days he worked as a grammar-school teacher. It had a lot to do with why she was fond of Eze, she admitted. Eze laughed. Chinwe shook her head, irritated that it was such a small reason for her mama’s toleration of such a large inconvenience. Little did Chinwe know that the inconvenience would grow even larger. For a while, anyway.
    So, yes, her mama invited him to the beans and soaked garri dinner that night. First, he flipped through the pages of his Watchtower, and then through the pages of his Awake! In between, Chinwe observed the fancy gold watch on his wrist. She observed his crisply ironed clothes, just as her mama had observed. She noticed that they were crisply tailored, too. They appeared expensive, not quickly stitched together – certainly not the handiwork of any of the travelling tailors who paraded the roads at the time.
    It was only after the magazine and Bible study was complete that Eze accepted the dinner invitation. I imagine now that he must have been enthusiastic in his acceptance. Sometimes I imagine also that he must have had an impish smile on his face.   Well, he continued to come back, the little rascal. And Chinwe actually grew accustomed to him. Sometimes she even laughed at his jokes.
    He was bright – had completed an engineering programme at the university. Civil engineering. This was why he did his evangelizing in the evenings, because during the day he worked in some division of Shell.
    He had grown up a Jehovah’s Witness and saw no reason to change now. There was something to be said for routines, he said. And something to be said for the fact that, just by virtue of the parents that God gave him, he had been automatically given access to this good news of God’s Kingdom, which, as he said, would lead to everlasting life.
    One evening, Chinwe’s mother asked him what his plans were for the future. He chuckled nervously then said, ‘Marriage and a family.’ And then he added that he wanted the right woman, not just any woman.
    ‘What would make her the right woman?’ Chinwe’s mother asked.
    ‘Well, for one thing,’ he said, ‘she would have to be a Witness.’
    ‘A witness?’ she asked. ‘A witness to what?’
    ‘A Witness,’ he said, stretching the word out, for emphasis. ‘You know, a Jehovah’s Witness.’
    ‘Ah,’ her mama said, very thoughtfully. And she went on to tell a story about Chinwe. She told the story in great detail. It went something like this: when Chinwe’s papa was still living, and Chinwe was around three or four years old, Chinwe stumbled upon her mama’s old wedding gown in the old chest where her mama stored it. She became obsessed with the gown, and with the idea of marriage, and so, starting that day, she would beg her papa to play what she called a wedding game with her. The game would usually take place in the evenings, just after dinner, when the chirping of the crickets was the loudest and could be heard clearly inside of the house. This last fact, Chinwe told me herself.
    Sometimes, Chinwe tells me, she can still remember the smell of the gown: something clean and fragrant, like the scent of a freshly mopped floor. The mothballs were what caused it to smell that way. The camphor in them gave off that aroma, a mix between peppermint and cinnamon.
    She’d breathe in the scent as her mama put the gown over her tiny body. I imagine it now: the way the sleeves must have extended far beyond Chinwe’s fingertips, so that her mama would have to roll them up for her. The neckline was certainly more like a shoulder line on Chinwe, because Chinwe has told me that it often fell past her shoulders and all the way to the floor, and that she’d tug and tug as the ceremony was taking place, just to try to keep the dress from falling once more to the ground.
    The train was the only part of the dress that was just as she liked, sprawling – more than a little like it must have been back when it trailed behind her mama. Just perfect, Chinwe would say, back then. As if the length of the train had an impact on the success of the fantasy.
    It was her mama who played the part of the minister, reciting the marriage speech. The step which you are about to take is the most important into which human beings can come . . . Do you take this girl to be your wedded wife, as long as you both shall live? I’ve heard the story and imagined it enough times now to be able to describe it as if it were my own experience: her papa would nod. He’d be on his knees, so that he was only slightly taller than Chinwe. He’d be wearing a black blazer, but underneath the blazer was just the white singlet that he always wore at night, and his blue-and-white-striped pyjama pants, which came with a matching top, but whose top they hardly ever saw him wear.
    ‘I do,’ he’d say to Chinwe’s mama.
    Do you take this man to be your wedded husband, as long as you both shall live?
    ‘I do,’ Chinwe would say.
    I now declare you husband and wife.
    Her papa would lean towards her and plant a kiss on each side of her face. And then it would be time for Chinwe to go to bed.
    That was the game they played, and her mama told Eze as much.
    Then one evening, just before they were to play the game, Jehovah’s Witnesses came knocking on their door, and Chinwe’s papa was inviting them in, but she, Chinwe’s mother, scolded him, in front of them, for even thinking to invite them in. Did he know that they were a cult? she asked.
    He politely withdrew his invitation and sent them away. It was the first time that Jehovah’s Witnesses had ever come to their door, and that was the treatment they received, thanks to her. So, she reasoned, perhaps this was that old story coming full circle. Perhaps this was God allowing her to make amends for that former discourtesy. And given that the discourtesy took place during one of the wedding-game nights, maybe all of that was a sign, a harbinger of things to come.
    She smiled widely as she said all this, and Eze smiled with her.   Chinwe’s mother herself never did become a Witness. Instead she encouraged Chinwe to become one, so that Chinwe would indeed marry the nice young man who was obviously well-to-do, and who would obviously provide for her, who only wanted for himself a Witness wife. Was it too much to ask? No, said Chinwe’s mother, responding to her own question, earnestly shaking her head.
    They did in fact marry, a year and a half after he first offered Chinwe and her mother the good news of God’s Kingdom. Chinwe was very dutiful about the wedding. On the surface her dutifulness must have looked like excitement. Perhaps it was.
    It was a large celebration, held at the Kingdom Hall on Rumuola Road. His parents and family members attended, along with his Jehovah’s Witness friends, whom he also referred to as family – as ‘brothers’ and ‘sisters’.
    Theirs was only a white wedding; no traditional one. Even the white wedding was relatively brief, and very sedate, a fact for which Chinwe might or might not have been grateful. It’s hard to know.   It was after their wedding that Chinwe’s mama encouraged them to live in Ehoro’s Estate. By this time, Chinwe had given up her teaching job ‘to take on more fully the role of a wife’, as her mama liked to explain it. Eze was the one who insisted on this to begin with (after all, they planned on having children soon and who would take care of the children if Chinwe kept up that job of hers?). Her mama had, of course, agreed.
    In any case, her mama encouraged them to live in Ehoro’s Estate for two reasons. First, Elelenwo was not too far from D/Line. That is, it was far enough for Chinwe and Eze to feel separate, to feel independent from her, but it was close enough that she could hop on a bus and come visit whenever she wanted. (This ease of access would be a good thing when they decided to have a child, she said.) Secondly, she reasoned that Ehoro’s Estate was a swanky neighbourhood, just up Eze’s alley; and...

"Sobre este título" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

Los mejores resultados en AbeBooks

1.

Okparanta, Chinelo
Editorial: Mariner Books 2013-08-13 (2013)
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: > 20
Librería
Ebooksweb COM LLC
(Bensalem, PA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Mariner Books 2013-08-13, 2013. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. 1. 0544003454. Nº de ref. de la librería Z0544003454ZN

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 3,94
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

2.

Okparanta, Chinelo
Editorial: Mariner Books
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos PAPERBACK Cantidad: 1
Librería
Vital Products COM LLC
(southampton, PA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Mariner Books. PAPERBACK. Estado de conservación: New. 0544003454. Nº de ref. de la librería Z0544003454ZN

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 3,94
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

3.

Okparanta, Chinelo
Editorial: Mariner Books
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos PAPERBACK Cantidad: 1
Librería
Bookhouse COM LLC
(Philadelphia, PA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Mariner Books. PAPERBACK. Estado de conservación: New. 0544003454. Nº de ref. de la librería Z0544003454ZN

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 3,94
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

4.

Okparanta, Chinelo
Editorial: Mariner Books
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos PAPERBACK Cantidad: 1
Librería
BookShop4U
(PHILADELPHIA, PA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Mariner Books. PAPERBACK. Estado de conservación: New. 0544003454. Nº de ref. de la librería Z0544003454ZN

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 3,94
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

5.

Okparanta, Chinelo
Editorial: Mariner Books
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos PAPERBACK Cantidad: 1
Librería
Qwestbooks COM LLC
(Bensalem, PA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Mariner Books. PAPERBACK. Estado de conservación: New. 0544003454. Nº de ref. de la librería Z0544003454ZN

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 3,97
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

6.

Okparanta, Chinelo
Editorial: Mariner Books
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
Academic Book Solutions
(Medford, NY, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Mariner Books. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. New, unread, and unused. Nº de ref. de la librería ABS-1336-1000

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 1,76
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 3,40
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

7.

Okparanta, Chinelo
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 15
Librería
Big River Books
(Powder Springs, GA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. Brand New! We ship daily Monday - Friday!. Nº de ref. de la librería 1EYDQW0011HH

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 4,12
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 2,98
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

8.

Okparanta, Chinelo
Editorial: Mariner Books
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos PAPERBACK Cantidad: 1
Librería
Booklot COM LLC
(Philadelphia, PA, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Mariner Books. PAPERBACK. Estado de conservación: New. 0544003454. Nº de ref. de la librería Z0544003454ZN

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 8,77
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

9.

Chinelo Okparanta
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos Cantidad: 1
Librería
BWB
(Valley Stream, NY, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Estado de conservación: New. Depending on your location, this item may ship from the US or UK. Nº de ref. de la librería 97805440034530000000

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 9,26
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

10.

Chinelo Okparanta
Editorial: Houghton Muffin Hartcourt Trade
ISBN 10: 0544003454 ISBN 13: 9780544003453
Nuevos Cantidad: > 20
Librería
INDOO
(Avenel, NJ, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Houghton Muffin Hartcourt Trade. Estado de conservación: New. Brand New. Nº de ref. de la librería 0544003454

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 6,62
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 2,98
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

Existen otras copia(s) de este libro

Ver todos los resultados de su búsqueda