4-D Branding: Cracking the Corporate Code of the Network Economy

 
9780273653684: 4-D Branding: Cracking the Corporate Code of the Network Economy

4-D Branding offers a revolutionary four-dimensional model for understanding brand strengths and weaknesses. It can just as easily be used to create a new brand or analyze the strategic options for established brands. The model enables companies to create their own unique 'brand code' or 'mindspace'. The brand code represents an organization's unique corporate DNA , which can be used to drive every aspect of the business - from product innovation to recruitment. 4D-Branding argues that in an era of transparent markets, branding has four dimensions: 1. The functional dimension: Everything to do with physical quality, taste, style & efficiency. Depend too heavily on this dimension and you run the risk of copycats stealing your market. 2. The social dimension: Buyers in any market make their purchase decision subjectively. It is based on what they feel best conveys or portrays their social identity. With growing instability, brands are increasingly powerful definers of social standing. 3. The mental dimension: In every human being there is an inner landscape of mental programming. 4D-Brands touch the soul. 4. The spiritual dimension: Understand the spiritual and you understand the connections between the brand, the product or the company, and the bigger system of which we are all part. The spiritual dimension is now purposely used to build brands. It is not a token gesture or a fashionable statement. To work it has to be believed and lived. Understand these four dimensions & create the brands of the future.

"Sinopsis" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

From the Inside Flap:

Preface

Say the word "branding" and it is like a magical incantation. A veil of commercial karma, reassurance as the logos of fast-moving consumer brands pass before your eyes: Coca-Cola, Heineken, Marlboro, Nescafe. Their names and images are magical, but there is no sleight of hand at work, no David Copperfield lurking with a sword, a ready smile, and a bucket of dry ice. This is magic created through years of painstaking work and piles of dollar bills invested in ad campaigns on expensive media such as television.

Trouble is, the magic is wearing off. Exit magician stage right. The 1950s, when the modern concept of branding was born and put into action, are now a distant memory. Gone are the days of corporate man and dutiful woman, 2.2 children, a house with a picket fence, and fulfilment through copious consumption and the acquisition of material possessions. The world has changed—and that includes the world of brands.

Today, brands are not the preserve of the marketing department. Brands are too important to be left to the marketing department—or any other "department," come to that. Organizational ghettoes do not create vibrant, world-changing brands.

Indeed, the contemporary brand—and the brand of the future—is about much more than marketing. A new art of branding is beginning to develop. This focuses on the brand as a management tool; a tool used in marketing, but also throughout the organization and beyond; a tool encompassing dealers, suppliers, investors, and customers.

The use of branding as a management tool means that branding is no longer restricted to consumer businesses. It is now of huge and growing importance in the business-to-business sector, in the production and selling of knowledge-based services, and in virtually every other industrial or business classification.

The impact of brands is now manifest in every single aspect of business life, from the smallest decision in the corner store to the biggest decision in the largest company. Inside and outside the organization, the brand is all-embracing. It touches all of our business activities. The brand is a packaging device. It delivers, in a very concentrated form, a business vision, business plan, corporate culture, image, and many more aspects of business life that were previously conceptually compartmentalized. Brands are increasingly important in al1 our working lives. That means that every one of us needs an understanding of what branding really is. Whether you work in its traditional stronghold of marketing, or in finance, IT, or human resources, branding will increasingly affect you. If you're one of the pioneers of the Network Economy, it will be absolutely critical to your success. In the cacophonous online world, your brand filters out your message from all the other noise.

The influence of branding is also growing outside the vibrant Network Economy. As well as being important to a variety of stakeholders in the business, branding is vital to a company's performance on the financial markets. The brand is now a highly valuable asset. In 1988, British foods company RHM (Rank Hovis McDougall) made history by becoming the first firm to include a brand valuation on its balance sheet—attaching an asset value to its brands. The brand is now becoming the dominant component in the financial valuation of any enterprise.

Indeed, I believe the brand is now a more important corporate driver than profit. After all, who is turned on by profit? Executives care about their share options, but they are alone in their passion. Customers and employees (unless they share significantly in the spoils) are left cold by talk of profits. When you buy something, do you care how profitable the manufacturer is?

This, I know, is heresy. Profits have ruled the corporate world since time immemorial, and of course they are important. But the most valid reason for choosing a driver other than profit is that profit is not unique to your company. What is the difference between two companies in the same market with the same levels of profit? A1l dollar bills are created equal—brands thrive on difference. It is difference that gives competitive advantage.

The modern concept of the brand is far removed from that understood in the past. Branding is all about uniqueness. In this age of sameness, difference rules. The brand, as I define it, is your company's differentiation code. It is a code as vita1, as powerful, as universal, and as unique as DNA.

The vast majority of the DNA code in human beings is identical. Difference is created by a very small percentage of our personal DNA. This is also the case with most products, services, and companies. There are very small differences between competitors in most businesses. The similarities are much greater than the differences. But a small amount of differentiation is enough not only to produce very different human personalities, but also to do the same with branded products, services, and companies.

4-D Branding aims to enable you to reach a full understanding of your brand's differentiation code and to make it work for you immediately.

4-D Branding is not a catch-all, abstract concept. There need not be anything vague about it. The brand can be precisely defined. The exact scope and specifications of its design, attitude, daily routines, and activities can be clearly established. If you achieve this, you can begin to build a brand that lasts—one that endures.

Today's brand builders have to create brands that can survive for the next five, ten, fifteen years. That will not be easy and many will fall by the wayside. Look at Levis. Yesterday's branding icon is now struggling to survive and to reinvent itself for changing times. Brand builders cannot afford to ignore the future. Indeed, they have to build today with the future in mind. The future is treacherous, unpredictable, and uncertain, but it is there to be seized and shaped. The future must be built into the brand.

My basic premise is that you—not an expensive consultant or a smart academic—are the person best able to construct the future of your business. You know your business best, and you have to learn to understand and manage your brand. You have to take responsibility for its long-term welfare.

If you are a leading actor in your marketplace, you will be actively shaping your future—at least the next three to five years. Looking further out, the future takes on a more elusive shape. Longer-term trends in society require the creative inspiration of artists, writers, and similar people.

This book explains a method that enables you to futurize your brand. It forces you to develop sides of your brand that would never be explored in a classic media situation. It requires personalized, intimate, and interactive communication, brand storytelling, and philosophizing. This is in total contrast to the mass marketing era, when a brand builder could get away with cosmetic superficiality. There is nothing superficial, trite or frivolous in truly, deeply, understanding your brand.

Today your brand has to have the qualities of a dear friend, someone you really trust (and I mean really). You should be able to shop for a product or a service, whether over the Net or down the shopping mall, and feel totally safe with what you are getting, seeing, buying, and experiencing. A brand should be something you relish listening to, a source of entertainment, and something connecting you with other people, forming a social community around the brand.

4-D Branding is as an introduction to systematically engineering this new kind of future-oriented management through branding. At every stage, I have aimed to make the book both simple and practical. Read it and reap.

From the Back Cover:

4-D Branding offers a revolutionary four-dimensional model for understanding brand strengths and weaknesses. It can be used to create a new brand or analyze the strategic options for established brands. The model enables companies to create their own unique "brand code" or "mindspace," the unique corporate DNA, that can be used to drive every aspect of a business—from product innovation to recruitment.

The 4-D model consists of:

  • The Functional Dimension. Describes the unique features of a product or service.
  • The Social Dimension. Speaks about the experience of the consumer as a user, Starbucks did when it introduced European café culture into the U.S.
  • The Mental Dimension. Creates an individual experience through the brand, as Nike did with "Just do it." Builds value in the minds of its users.
  • The Spiritual Dimension. Talks about what the brand stands for. The 4-D brand goes right to the core of the customer's system of beliefs, as Anita Roddick did with Body Shop.

Companies invest fortunes in creating and maintaining their brands. Much of this money is spent with no clear objective or any means of evaluating its impact. 4-D Branding offers both a clear analytical framework and a method of measuring the impact of your branding, backed by a wealth of new examples.One-dimensional branding has to give way to four-dimensional branding."—Sir Richard Branson

"Sobre este título" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

Los mejores resultados en AbeBooks

1.

Gad, Thomas
Editorial: Financial Times/Prentice Hall (2000)
ISBN 10: 0273653687 ISBN 13: 9780273653684
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 2
Librería
Murray Media
(North Miami Beach, FL, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Financial Times/Prentice Hall, 2000. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. Never used!. Nº de ref. de la librería P110273653687

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 36,61
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 1,68
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

2.

Thomas Gad
Editorial: Financial Times/Prentice Hall (2000)
ISBN 10: 0273653687 ISBN 13: 9780273653684
Nuevos Tapa dura Primera edición Cantidad: 1
Librería
Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Financial Times/Prentice Hall, 2000. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. book. Nº de ref. de la librería M0273653687

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 43,60
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

3.

Gad, Thomas
Editorial: Financial Times/Prentice Hall
ISBN 10: 0273653687 ISBN 13: 9780273653684
Nuevos Tapa dura Cantidad: 1
Librería
Cloud 9 Books
(Wellington, FL, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Financial Times/Prentice Hall. Hardcover. Estado de conservación: New. 0273653687 New Condition. Nº de ref. de la librería NEW7.1003909

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 52,15
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 4,21
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío