I Know How She Does It: How Successful Women Make the Most of their Time

3,69 valoración promedio
( 1.675 valoraciones por Goodreads )
 
9780241199510: I Know How She Does It: How Successful Women Make the Most of their Time

Everyone has an opinion, anecdote, or horror story about women and work. Now the acclaimed author of What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast shows how real working women with families are actually making the most of their time.

“Having it all” has become the subject of countless books, articles, debates, and social media commentary, with passions running high in all directions. Many now believe this to be gospel truth: Any woman who wants to advance in a challenging career has to make huge sacrifices. She’s unlikely to have a happy marriage, quality time with her kids (assuming she can have kids at all), a social life, hobbies, or even a decent night’s sleep.

But what if balancing work and family is actually not as hard as it’s made out to be? What if all those tragic anecdotes ignore the women who quietly but consistently do just fine with the juggle?

Instead of relying on scattered stories, time management expert Laura Vanderkam set out to add hard data to the debate. She collected hour-by-hour time logs from 1,001 days in the lives of women who make at least $100,000 a year. And she found some surprising patterns in how these women spend the 168 hours that every one of us has each week.

Overall, these women worked less and slept more than they assumed they did before they started
tracking their time. They went jogging or to the gym, played with their children, scheduled date nights with their significant others, and had lunches with friends. They made time for the things that gave them pleasure and meaning, fitting the pieces together like tiles in a mosaic—without adhering to overly rigid schedules that would eliminate flexibility and spontaneity.

Vanderkam shares specific strategies that her subjects use to make time for the things that really matter to them. For instance, they . . .
* Work split shifts (such as seven hours at work, four off, then another two at night from home). This allows them to see their kids without falling behind professionally.
* Get creative about what counts as quality family time. Breakfasts together and morning story time count as much as daily family dinners, and they’re often easier to manage.
* Take it easy on the housework. You can free up a lot of time by embracing the philosophy of “good enough” and getting help from other members of your household (or a cleaning service).
* Guard their leisure time. Full weekend getaways may be rare, but many satisfying hobbies can be done in small bursts of time. An hour of crafting feels better than an hour of reality TV.

With examples from hundreds of real women, Vanderkam proves that you don’t have to give up on the things you really want. I Know How She Does It will inspire you to build a life that works, one hour at a time.

"Sinopsis" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

About the Author:

LAURA VANDERKAM is the bestselling author of What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast, All the Money in the World, 168 Hours, and Grindhopping. She is a frequent contributor to Fast Company’s website and a member of USA Today’s board of contributors. Her work has also appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Fortune, and other publications. She lives with her husband and their four children outside Philadelphia.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.:

Introduction

“Remember the berry season is short.”

I came across this poignant thought the other day in the most pedestrian of places: on the basket our local pick-your-own strawberry farm gives visitors before they hit the fields. I was there on a sunny June day with my seven-year-old, Jasper, and four-year-old, Sam. My husband, Michael, had taken our two-year-old daughter, Ruth, fishing at a nearby pond. I was woozy on the hay ride to the fields, from the heat and the bumps on the rutted road, and also from what was then still a new secret: another baby on the way, joining the crew when all this hilly green in southeastern Pennsylvania would be covered with snow. As I fought back my dizziness, I stared at the found poetry on this empty box: “Remember the berry season is short. This box holds approximately 10 lbs level full, 15 lbs heaping full.”

It is a metaphor for life, perhaps, in that everything is a metaphor for life. The berry season is short. So how full, exactly, do I intend to fill the box? Or, if we slice away the metaphor, we could just ask this: what does the good life look like for me?

I think about this question frequently, writing in the genre I do. While self-help gets a reputation for flimsiness, at its best it takes a practical look at this eternal question, with a bonus not all philosophers offer: ideas and strategies for figuring it out.

I write about the good life through the lens of time, because a life is lived in hours. What you do with your life will be a function of how you spend the 8,760 hours that make a year, the 700,000 or so that make a life: at strawberry farms, rocking toddlers to sleep, and pursuing work that alters at least some corner of the universe.

The good news for those often told to limit their aspirations is that the box will hold all these things. It can hold all these things and more.

This book is about how real people have created full lives. It is about how you can borrow from their discoveries to do so too. It is about how you can move around and rethink the hours of your weeks to nurture your career, your relationships, and yourself, and still enjoy more open space than most people think is possible. It is, in short, about how to enjoy and make the most of your time, by which I mean investing as much as you wish in everything that matters: work, family, community, leisure. It is about celebrating abundance rather than lamenting choices or claiming that no one can have it all.

I find the subject of how we spend our time fascinating. I approach time management as a journalist, studying data sets and interviewing successful people about how they use their hours. In my previous books (168 Hours and What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast), I’ve tried to share these discoveries and tips for making readers’ lives work. But as I wrote these books, I realized two things. First, I was most drawn to the stories and strategies of women like me, who were building careers and families at the same time. Second, for all I probed my subjects to describe their lives, I was mostly relying on their anecdotes and storytelling. I wanted to see people’s schedules in all their messy glory. I wanted to look at their time logs and see the curious places the data led. That’s why I wrote this book, adding a researcher hat to my journalist one, trying to understand what 1,001 days in the lives of professional women and their families really look like.

There is much to learn from seeing how people use their hours to achieve their goals. Learning their strategies can be empowering; it reminds us that we have the power to shape our lives too. Years ago, when I filled out my first 168-hour (one week) time log, I thought that it seemed strange to view life as cells on a spreadsheet. But over time I came to see that I could view myself as the artist deciding on those cells. I became a mosaic maker, carefully placing tiles. By thinking about the arrangement, and watching others, and trying different strategies, over time I could create an intricate and satisfying pattern. I could create a mosaic that embraced new things: new opportunities in my working life, the new children whose lives I’ve loved watching unfold. Sometimes the larger world delights in telling people that a full life will be harried, leading one to being maxed out, or torn. But while it is the rare artist who can create a perfectly blissful mosaic, focusing only on the stressful moments ignores the other sweet moments, like making strawberry shortcakes with those bright red berries, and getting a note from someone who tells you your book has changed her life.

Life is simultaneously complex and compelling. It is stressful and it is wonderful. But if you believe, like I do, that the good life can be a full life—a level full life or even a heaping full life—then I invite you to study how you place the tiles of your time, energy, and attention. I invite you to think about the pattern with the goal, over time, of making an even more satisfying picture.

After all, the berry season is short. I believe in filling it with all the joy that is possible.

CHAPTER 1

The Mosaic

Life is not lived solely in stories. Yet this is the way we talk about our lives: in moments that must impart a lesson. Consequently, in much of the literature on work and life, our tale would begin with a Recitation of Dark Moments: a snowstorm threatening to maroon me in Los Angeles while my husband is in Europe and my three young children are with a sitter in Pennsylvania who wasn’t planning on keeping them for several snowy days straight. Or, perhaps, I am in New York City overnight in order to be on a morning show at dawn. I am trying to turn in early when my husband calls to report that, after taking the kids to the circus, he’s realized they’re locked out of our new house. He’s in problem-solving mode, calling me to get the numbers of people with a spare key, and when they don’t pick up the phone, letting me know that the locksmith will be there in two hours. I shouldn’t worry. They have adequate bottles! But of course the net result is that I am pacing around my hotel room, picturing my five-month-old baby out in the car in the middle of the cold night. How am I supposed to sleep after that?

I could begin with such tales, and then lament the craziness of modern life, and the impossibility of having it all. Ever since The Atlantic put Anne-Marie Slaughter’s manifesto on this topic on the cover, and scored millions of reads, it’s a truth in media circles that the phrase “can’t have it all” lures women in. Tales that let us be voyeurs to such foibles draw clicks. People hunt for more extreme examples. An editor seeking submissions for a book of such stories suggested, as an example of what she wanted, “getting a text message from a sick child while flying an F-16 over Afghanistan.” In 2012, the legal world posted reams of comments in response to a widely circulated departure memo from a Clifford Chance associate with two young children. In it, she chronicled an awful day, describing middle-of-the-night wake-ups from the kids, a colleague who sat on a note until day care was closing, a bad commute, a not-exactly-helpful husband, and a long to-do list waiting for her after she wrestled the kids into bed. “Needless to say, I have not been able to simultaneously meet the demands of career and family,” she wrote her colleagues, and so the only choice available, the choice we all seem to understand, was to quit.

But in this book, I want to tell a different story. The key to this is realizing that life isn’t lived in epiphanies, and that looking for lessons and the necessity of big life changes in dark moments profoundly limits our lives.

I came to see this not in an aha moment but in an accumulation of conversations that convinced me that my research into time use might be giving me insights that the larger world was missing. As one example, in summer 2013, I talked with a young woman who’d formerly worked at a consulting firm. She was thinking of starting a coaching company that would counsel women like our Clifford Chance heroine to negotiate for part-time or flexible work arrangements. It was a perfectly good business idea, but her explanation for why she liked the concept stuck in my mind: I looked at the senior women in my firm, she told me, and there was no one whose life I wanted.

Normally, I might have let that go as background noise, the sort of thing young women say to one another, but I had been reading a lot of Sheryl Sandberg. So I began formulating a response that I eventually realized needed to become its own treatise.

It starts like this: Several years ago, I wrote a book called 168 Hours: You Have More Time Than You Think. One happy result of releasing the book was that numerous companies asked me to come speak about how people should manage their time. To make my workshop more useful, I started asking a few audience members to keep track of their time before our session. These time logs, which are half-hour-by-half-hour records of an entire week, revealed what issues people in the audience cared about, and how much time they spent at work, at home, and on personal activities.* I’d analyze these logs with my audience guinea pigs so I could talk about the challenges people faced. These audience members could then tell their colleagues how they dealt with them. Our sessions were interactive and, I hoped, enlightening.

I speak to all sorts of audiences, but often the women’s networking group at whichever company I was visiting decided to sponsor my talk. Many of the time logs I collected for my talks, therefore, would come from the female executives who ran these networking groups. Many of these women had children. And, over time, I noticed something.

Their lives didn’t look that bad.

Perhaps it speaks to the pervasiveness of those Recitations of Dark Moments that I thought I’d see perpetual chaos, or at least novelist Allison Pearson’s I Don’t Know How She Does It scene of an executive distressing pies to make them look homemade, but nope. There were tough moments, to be sure, but I also saw kid time, husband time, leisure time, sleep. I’d even seen time logs from senior women in consulting firms, that industry in which the entrepreneur who wanted to start the coaching company hadn’t seen anyone whose life she wanted. To be sure, not everyone would want such a life. In the log she kept for me in March 2014, Vanessa Chan, a partner in a major consulting firm and mother to two young girls, woke up Wednesday morning in one city, which was a different city from the one she woke up in Tuesday morning, which was not the city she lived in either. She arrived home late Wednesday after her girls were asleep. She gave the sleeping children a kiss before going back to work. If we wanted a tale inspiring work/life lamentation, we could focus on that scene.

But when you see the whole of a week, you see different moments too. Chan missed Tuesday and Wednesday, but she put her girls to bed more nights that week than she didn’t. She read them multiple chapters in Little House on the Prairie. I tallied it up, and she logged more time reading to her kids than, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ American Time Use Survey, the average stay-at-home mom of young kids reads to hers. She visited one daughter’s school and set up playdates with other parents while she was there. She did very little work on the weekend (not that it never happened, she told me, but she tried to keep a lid on it). Instead, she organized a game night for her family and went skiing, and took her daughters to the Lego movie. She had a coffee date with her husband. She watched TV and did a session on the spin bike. Far from distressing pies to make them look homemade, Chan spent a reasonable amount of time designing a Pokémon cake for her daughter’s upcoming birthday. In all her busyness, she had time to indulge her hobby of making and decorating Pinterest-worthy cakes.

Not everyone would want Chan’s life. Chan herself didn’t want it forever. She had entrepreneurial aspirations for a second career, and when I checked back a year later, she was starting a company called Head First Ventures, which focused on bringing to life product concepts that Chan developed to solve a wide range of consumer gripes and pet peeves. But even if not everyone would want Chan’s life, I couldn’t claim that no reasonable person would want this life either. Cake designing, skiing, and snuggly bedtime stories do not imply a work/life horror show.

I saw this same phenomenon in many allegedly horrid industries: finance, law, medicine. Women were leaning in to their careers, and they were leaning in to the rest of their lives too.

How did they do it? The math is straightforward. There are 168 hours in a week. If you work 50, and sleep 8 per night (56 hours per week in total), that leaves 62 hours for other things. If you work 60 hours and sleep 8 hours per night, that leaves 52 hours for other things. Time diary studies (mine and others) find that very few people consistently work more than 60 hours per week, even if they claim they do.

The time is there to have what matters. Like Chan, though, we have to choose to see this, and many people choose not to. In the discussion of women’s life choices, we often focus on the crazy moments, or the difficult moments, which makes sense. They’re darkly entertaining. These get the press. Other moments—like eating breakfast with your kids or playing board games together on the weekend—aren’t talked about. High-powered people may not mention them, partly because they absorb the not-unfounded message that talking about family at work could hurt you professionally. Leisure also isn’t something people stress in conversation. They may mention, casually, something that happened on The Bachelor, but they won’t introduce themselves by announcing they spend their evenings watching it. When people ask how things are going, the modern professional answers this: “Busy.” I do it myself.

But what if this logical leap—these stressful things happened, and therefore life is crazy and unsustainable—limits our stories? The human brain is structured for loss aversion, and so negative moments stand out more starkly than positive moments, particularly if they fit a popular thesis. We lament the softball game missed due to a late flight, and start down the road of soul searching and the need to limit hours at work or perhaps resign, but we don’t rend our garments over the softball game missed because another kid had a swim meet at the exact same time. No one ever draws the conclusion from that hard-choice moment that you need to get rid of the other kid. We could draw numerous conclusions from our Clifford Chance associate’s horrible day—she needs a different child care arrangement, she needs a different division of labor at home, she needs to be more clear about her boundaries at work, or some days are just miserable and such is the human condition—but these are not the conclusions that fit the chant of our modern Greek chorus: no one can have it all, so don’t you even try.

I’ve been pondering this aspect of narrative, and w...

"Sobre este título" puede pertenecer a otra edición de este libro.

Comprar nuevo Ver libro

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America

Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

Añadir al carrito

Los mejores resultados en AbeBooks

1.

Laura Vanderkam
Editorial: Penguin Books Ltd, United Kingdom (2015)
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 10
Librería
The Book Depository
(London, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Penguin Books Ltd, United Kingdom, 2015. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. Language: English . Brand New Book. The most positive take on work and family I ve read in a long time New York TimesDo you struggle to balance the demands of a successful career with quality time with family and friends, your hobbies, and even a decent night s sleep? In I Know How She Does It, time management expert and bestselling author of What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast Laura Vanderkam reveals the surprising strategies you can use to spend more time on the things you enjoy. By following her advice, you will be able to work less, sleep more, enjoy date nights, go to the gym and socialise.Based on hour-by-hour time logs from 1,001 days in the lives of real women, Vanderkam proves that you don t have to give up on the things you really want. I Know How She Does It offers specific strategies proven to help you build a life that works, one hour at a time. Nº de ref. de la librería AAU9780241199510

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 9,84
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

2.

Vanderkam, Laura
Editorial: Portfolio Penguin (2015)
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
The Monster Bookshop
(Fleckney, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Portfolio Penguin, 2015. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. BRAND NEW ** SUPER FAST SHIPPING FROM UK WAREHOUSE ** 30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Nº de ref. de la librería mon0001572942

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 9,29
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 2,25
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

3.

Laura Vanderkam
Editorial: Penguin Books Ltd, United Kingdom (2015)
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 10
Librería
The Book Depository US
(London, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Penguin Books Ltd, United Kingdom, 2015. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. Language: English . Brand New Book. The most positive take on work and family I ve read in a long time New York TimesDo you struggle to balance the demands of a successful career with quality time with family and friends, your hobbies, and even a decent night s sleep? In I Know How She Does It, time management expert and bestselling author of What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast Laura Vanderkam reveals the surprising strategies you can use to spend more time on the things you enjoy. By following her advice, you will be able to work less, sleep more, enjoy date nights, go to the gym and socialise.Based on hour-by-hour time logs from 1,001 days in the lives of real women, Vanderkam proves that you don t have to give up on the things you really want. I Know How She Does It offers specific strategies proven to help you build a life that works, one hour at a time. Nº de ref. de la librería AAU9780241199510

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 11,85
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

4.

Vanderkam, Laura
Editorial: Portfolio Penguin (2015)
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos Tapa blanda Cantidad: > 20
Librería
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Portfolio Penguin, 2015. Estado de conservación: New. Do you struggle to balance the demands of a successful career with quality time with family and friends, your hobbies, and even a decent night's sleep? This book reveals strategies you can use to spend more time on the things you enjoy. Num Pages: 304 pages. BIC Classification: KJMT; VSC. Category: (G) General (US: Trade); (P) Professional & Vocational; (U) Tertiary Education (US: College). Dimension: 199 x 130 x 22. Weight in Grams: 216. . 2015. Paperback. . . . . . Nº de ref. de la librería V9780241199510

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 12,77
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
De Irlanda a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

5.

Laura Vanderkam
Editorial: Penguin Books (2015)
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos Tapa blanda Cantidad: 3
Librería
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Penguin Books, 2015. Estado de conservación: New. Nº de ref. de la librería EH9780241199510

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 9,82
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 2,99
De Alemania a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

6.

Vanderkam, Laura
Editorial: Portfolio Penguin
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos Tapa blanda Cantidad: > 20
Librería
Kennys Bookstore
(Olney, MD, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Portfolio Penguin. Estado de conservación: New. Do you struggle to balance the demands of a successful career with quality time with family and friends, your hobbies, and even a decent night's sleep? This book reveals strategies you can use to spend more time on the things you enjoy. Num Pages: 304 pages. BIC Classification: KJMT; VSC. Category: (G) General (US: Trade); (P) Professional & Vocational; (U) Tertiary Education (US: College). Dimension: 199 x 130 x 22. Weight in Grams: 216. . 2015. Paperback. . . . . Books ship from the US and Ireland. Nº de ref. de la librería V9780241199510

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 13,47
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

7.

Laura Vanderkam
Editorial: Penguin Books Ltd
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
THE SAINT BOOKSTORE
(Southport, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Penguin Books Ltd. Paperback. Estado de conservación: new. BRAND NEW, I Know How She Does it: How Successful Women Make the Most of Their Time, Laura Vanderkam, "The most positive take on work and family I've read in a long time." (New York Times). Do you struggle to balance the demands of a successful career with quality time with family and friends, your hobbies, and even a decent night's sleep? In I Know How She Does It, time management expert and best-selling author of What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast Laura Vanderkam reveals the surprising strategies you can use to spend more time on the things you enjoy. By following her advice, you will be able to work less, sleep more, enjoy date nights, go to the gym and socialise. Based on hour-by-hour time logs from 1,001 days in the lives of real women, Vanderkam proves that you don't have to give up on the things you really want. I Know How She Does It offers specific strategies proven to help you build a life that works, one hour at a time. Nº de ref. de la librería B9780241199510

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 6,13
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 7,83
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

8.

Laura Vanderkam
Editorial: Portfolio Penguin (2015)
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos Tapa blanda Cantidad: > 20
Librería
Ria Christie Collections
(Uxbridge, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Portfolio Penguin, 2015. Estado de conservación: New. book. Nº de ref. de la librería ria9780241199510_rkm

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 10,76
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 4,37
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

9.

Laura Vanderkam
Editorial: Penguin Books Ltd 2015-06-25, UK (2015)
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos paperback Cantidad: > 20
Librería
Blackwell's
(Oxford, OX, Reino Unido)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Penguin Books Ltd 2015-06-25, UK, 2015. paperback. Estado de conservación: New. Nº de ref. de la librería 9780241199510

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 8,94
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: EUR 6,77
De Reino Unido a Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

10.

Laura VanderKam
Editorial: Portfolio Penguin (2015)
ISBN 10: 0241199514 ISBN 13: 9780241199510
Nuevos Paperback Cantidad: 1
Librería
Irish Booksellers
(Rumford, ME, Estados Unidos de America)
Valoración
[?]

Descripción Portfolio Penguin, 2015. Paperback. Estado de conservación: New. book. Nº de ref. de la librería M0241199514

Más información sobre esta librería | Hacer una pregunta a la librería

Comprar nuevo
EUR 16,40
Convertir moneda

Añadir al carrito

Gastos de envío: GRATIS
A Estados Unidos de America
Destinos, gastos y plazos de envío

Existen otras copia(s) de este libro

Ver todos los resultados de su búsqueda