Martin the weaver; or, The power of gold. From the Fr., by mrs. C. Overend

 
9780217428538: Martin the weaver;  or, The power of gold. From the Fr., by mrs. C. Overend
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated.1870 Excerpt: ... CHAPTER II. HELP IN TIME OF NEED. 'Blessed are they that keep judgment, and he that doeth righteousness at all times.'--Psalm cvi. 3. jFTER a slight repast, Martin set to work, and soon the shuttle flew rapidly under his hand between the threads so skilfully arranged. The weaver seemed resolved, by diligence and increased activity, to make up for the time he had lost during the first part of the day. Walter went to the wood to gather sticks, for the faggot that he had brought in before was nearly finished. The weather was very cold, and it was necessary to keep up the fire for the sake of the invalid. Lively and active, the young boy nimbly climbed the steep mountain, ran with a light step over the hardened snow which crackled under his feet, and tried to make the excessive cold more bearable by blowing on his fingers and beating his body with his arms. He seemed not to mind it much, although his face was blue and his nose red. Any one that had seen the poor boy in the frozen forest in such terrible weather, clothed in a thin linen blouse, with worn shoes which scarcely protected his feet, would certainly have pitied him. Yet Walter did not seem like a boy who sought for pity: his eyes were bright and cheerful; and when exercise began to warm him, he whistled as joyously as the birds which were perched in flocks on the branches of the trees and shrubs. At any other time it would have given Walter great pleasure to watch the birds. It was now getting late in the day, and he knew that he must not stop to amuse himself if he meant to take home a sufficient provision of wood. Therefore he gave all his attention to the dead branches. As soon as he perceived one, he climbed the tree, nimbly cut off the branch with a small hatchet, and let it fall on the snow, the...

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